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jdporter

by jdporter (Canon)
on May 30, 2002 at 16:48 UTC ( #170442=user: print w/replies, xml ) Need Help??


I'm not sure when I joined SiteDocClan, but my first edit to the SDC wiki was on 2003-08-27.

I'm not sure when I joined pmdev, but my first patch was on 2006-01-26.


Rooms in my treehouse:
Popular links on homenodes
Tutorials digest
Survey of POOP Modules
Some cb snippets
Bookmarks/miscellany
Restyling PerlMonks
Sitedoclet usage analysis
Scratchpads & Blogs:
pad for admin-related stuff
pad for pmdev-related stuff
pad for other stuff
User Posts
CPAN contribs

Some of my root (and root-like) posts you may find interesting:

PerlMonks/Community/Fun:
PerlMonks for the Absolute Beginner
New Service: Thread Watcher
New Snippets Index
cbshitory
XY Problem
Where should I post Y?
CrazyTachTillyN
Adso.pl
jdporter's place in the name space
test of ancient magic
test this
9
Nodes 1 .. 1000
There is no Perl Illuminati
PerlMonks Memorial Garden

Also check out my Free Nodelet Hacks
Also check out  
Perl/Programming:
(RFC) Arrays: A Tutorial/Reference
Tk Photo Slideshow, with scrolling and scaling
Simple Console Menuing System
Control and Query Win32 Services at the command line
Strategy Handles
Tie::Scalar::Substring
Linked Lists With No Memory Leak
Statistics::SGT
There's Only One Way To Do It
Read and write Windows "shortcut" links
Create and Pop Up Outlook Notes from Perl
IO::MultiHandle - Operate on multiple file handles as one
map-like hash iterator

Here are some links I keep handy in my Free Nodelet:

Free Nodelet Settings
User Settings
Display Settings
Nodelet Settings
log out
PerlMonks statistics
Message Inbox
last hour of cb
Full-Page Chat
Just_Chat
cbhist
cb60
Chatterbox statistics

Monks I've met in meatspace:


PerlMonks Quine:

perl -MLWP::Simple -e "getprint 'http://perlmonks.org/?node_id=170442; +displaytype=displaycode'"


Signature

Previously, I used this:

Between the mind which plans and the hands which build, there must be a mediator... and this mediator must be the heart.
This is a line (my own translation) from the classic movie Metropolis. Incidentally, my homenode pic above is a frame cap from this movie as well.

In the movie, the building of the mega-city Metropolis is likened to the legendary tower of Babel. This was intended as a warning: Knowing the fate which befell Babel, the builders of the present age should take care to avoid the same sins, and thus the same fate. Specifically, the builders of Babel lacked "heart" (a spirit of compassion and a willingness to compromise), and this resulted in a cataclysmic conflict between management and labor.


Most languages are like StackOverflow: I have a question, I want the best answer.
Perl is like PerlMonks: I have a doubt, I want to read an interesting discussion about it that is likely to go on a tangent. q-:

tye, in Re: What is PerlMonks? (why Perl)



<input type=submit value="border-width=d" " />





Posts by jdporter
New PerlMonks for Perl 6 - A Good Idea in Meditations
11 direct replies — Read more / Contribute
by jdporter
on Jun 24, 2010 at 11:12

    I've decided that it really would be better for there to be a new, separate PerlMonks for Perl 6, when it goes mainstream.

    I know that, from a Perl 5 / Existing PerlMonks perspective, there are good arguments to be made for keeping the "Perl Community" unified. However:

    1. Having a separate site for Perl 6 does not imply that the Perl Community is fractured. As it is, there are plenty of Perl-related sites. What's one more? ;-)

    2. Looking forward to that glorious future when "Perl" means "Perl 6", it would be kind of a drag to have the principal Perl community site encumbered with so much Perl 5 baggage: multitudes of Q&A, documentation, tutorials, contributed code, etc., etc., pertaining to a language which is no longer of any interest but archeological.

    3. Perhaps most importantly, we are now more than painfully aware that the architecture of PerlMonks suffers from serious problems, flaws, and kludgities. In many ways, this is analogous to the situation with Perl 5 which inspired @Larry to rewrite the next version of Perl from scratch.

    I see the passing of the torch to Perl 6 as the perfect opportunity to re-invent PerlMonks as well. To make it new, better.

    So I propose that we, Perl Monks, officially, start drafting a roadmap, a spec, for a new PerlMonks. We want to capture everything that's good about PerlMonks, everything that makes it "work". And we also want to take note of what's bad, what's broken, so that we may consciously avoid those problems in the next version.

    One of the really great things about the current incarnation of PerlMonks is that the engine is written in Perl (5). The users of the language can maintain the site in their own language. (Or, to put it another way, the site's maintainers are drawn from the site's users.) It is a stellar example of a language community successfully eating their own dogfood. (And it may, conversely, go a long way toward explaining the failure of Java Junkies, for example.) Therefore:

    A Perl 6 community site should be written in Perl 6.

    Of course, this presumes the existence of a decent web site framework written in Perl 6...

    Hey Arunbear, if you got your ears on.... moritz mentioned that you were working on a rewrite from scratch. True? If so, what is the status of that? Even if it's comatose, perhaps you could contribute its roadmap or other foundational artifacts.

    What is the sound of Windows? Is it not the sound of a wall upon which people have smashed their heads... all the way through?
Size of text in replies when showing threads in Perl Monks Discussion
5 direct replies — Read more / Contribute
by jdporter
on Nov 12, 2009 at 19:02

    Moderately observant readers will no doubt have noticed that, when viewing any "thread" (a node and its replies), the replies are displayed in a font smaller than the top node. It is being done with a hard-coded <font size="-1"> in HTML.

    This has been done since time immemorial, but we're not ones to be enslaved to tradition. There has been some commotion, over the years, to eliminate this hard-coded font size setting. Users who want to do something special with their font sizes should be free to adjust their on-site CSS to do so.

    Before we eliminate this rather inflexible style enforcement... Does anyone have any arguments why it should not (or should) be done?

Snippets Section and Code Catacombs deprecated for new posting in Perl Monks Discussion
3 direct replies — Read more / Contribute
by jdporter
on Oct 29, 2009 at 09:29

    Lectori monastici cognoscentii will have noticed that the Snippets Section and Code Catacombs have been closed for posting. These sections are now archival only. All new posting of "substantial" code should be done in the Cool Uses For Perl section.

    In this way, Snippets Section and Code Catacombs follow the old Craft section into crepuscular obsolescence. All three sections were "strange", implemented using peculiar data structures and code; CUFP is "normal", being implemented with the same structure and code as the other major sections (SOPW, Meds, PMD, etc.).

    Like Craft, Snippets and Code will remain available for reading, browsing, and searching.

    Note also that Snippets and Code are no longer listed in the Sections nodelet, but have been moved to the Leftovers nodelet, alongside the link to Craft. Also, the "nav menu" at the top of each PerlMonks page no longer contains links to these sections.

    Between the mind which plans and the hands which build, there must be a mediator... and this mediator must be the heart.
Getting Started with Moose in Meditations
5 direct replies — Read more / Contribute
by jdporter
on Aug 06, 2008 at 16:57

    Getting Started with Moose

    I recently decided to get with the program and use Moose in my current/impending projects. All the cool kids are doing it!

    I immediately hit a roadblock: I'm using ActiveState Perl, and their repository does not have Moose. (Apparently they had some problems building it.)

    So I went searching, got help, and resolved my problems. Now I have Moose installed. Here's how I did it, and below are links to essential Moose-related resources.

    But first, I want to mention something which I found confusing: MooseX. What is MooseX? How is it different from Moose?

    MooseX is a namespace for Moose eXtensions which are not part of the Moose package proper. You will find a large number of Moose extensions in the MooseX namepace on CPAN.

    Windows: ActiveState Perl 5.8

    1. If you don't already know how to, read A guide to installing modules for Win32.
    2. Add the following repository to your configuration:
      http://theoryx5.uwinnipeg.ca/ppms/package.xml
      You can name it "kobes".
    3. While viewing all packages (vs. viewing installed packages), find "Moose" in the list, and install it. (Type  ppm install Moose to circumvent the gui.)
    This will install Moose and a number of dependencies.

    Alternative ppm repositories are available; see http://theoryx5.uwinnipeg.ca/ppms/ for some suggestions.

    Windows: ActiveState Perl 5.10

    1. If you don't already know how to, read A guide to installing modules for Win32.
    2. Add the following repository to your configuration:
      http://cpan.uwinnipeg.ca/PPMPackages/10xx/package.xml
      You can name it "kobes".
    3. While viewing all packages (vs. viewing installed packages), find "Moose" in the list, and install it. (Type  ppm install Moose to circumvent the gui.)
    This will install Moose and a number of dependencies.

    Alternative ppm repositories are available; see http://cpan.uwinnipeg.ca/PPMPackages/10xx/ for some suggestions.

    Other platforms, including Strawberry Perl on Windows

    ActiveState Perl has its own way of doing things; the rest of the world uses a module installation tool called cpan.
    Please read A Guide to Installing Modules if you are not familiar with it.

    Install Moose by typing   install Moose   at the cpan> prompt.
    This will install Moose and a number of dependencies directly from CPAN.

    Windows: Camelbox Perl

    If you're using Camelbox, you're in luck: Moose is pre-packaged with the perl installation. However, you may still wish to install some Moose extensions, which are not-prepackaged with Camelbox.

    Resources

Filtering of homenode html ON by default in Perl Monks Discussion
7 direct replies — Read more / Contribute
by jdporter
on Apr 16, 2008 at 12:22

    Following up to this subthread of another PMD, some people (myself included) feel that filtering HTML of homenodes should be on by default. This is a fairly major change, so its visibility should be maximized before it happens. As ysth said, this change "would need to be well advertised. But there's no point in doing so until someone steps forward to do the work." Well, I've done the work (two patches, not yet applied), so now I'm doing the advertising.

    Note well, ye monks: This change will immediately revert all users to having homenode HTML filtering on. If you then decide you want to open up the filter to allow CSS, images, etc, then you can set the flag to allow this. A new checkbox will appear in your User Settings, replacing the one which currently says "Filter HTML of monks' homenodes".

    Update: What gets filtered, you ask? The essential effect of this change is to invert the meaning of the "filter html" flag — the one currently labeled "Filter HTML of monks' homenodes" in User Settings. Instead of checking the checkbox to turn on filtering, you'd check it to turn off filtering. Among other things, this means that Anonymous Monk will have filtering on instead of off, and new users will have filtering on by default. But technically, under the hood, the change is being implemented with a new flag, which will initially be unset for all monks. And unset means off. To see what HTML gets filtered, see the existing FAQ, Filter HTML of monks' homenodes.

    A word spoken in Mind will reach its own level, in the objective world, by its own weight
Let users link in a javascript library in Perl Monks Discussion
3 direct replies — Read more / Contribute
by jdporter
on Apr 14, 2008 at 12:05

    Currently, users can have PerlMonks automatically include a link to an arbitrary CSS source in each page. (Go to Display Settings and look under Stylesheet Settings.) I think it would be nice to be able similarly to link in a javascript source, such as jQuery, script.aculo.us, or other AJAX library.

    It is possible to use the Free Nodelet to bring such a link into each of your pages; but there are two downsides to this approach: 1, some users might not otherwise have a need or desire to enable their Free Nodelet; and B, the Free Nodelet is not available for some pages, such as the four frames in the Full-Page Chat.

    The patches to implement this have been drafted:

    • htmlhead - (patch)
    • Display Settings - (patch)

    A word spoken in Mind will reach its own level, in the objective world, by its own weight
Shut down the Snippets Section in Perl Monks Discussion
6 direct replies — Read more / Contribute
by jdporter
on Apr 14, 2008 at 09:59

    What do the Monks think about shutting down the Snippets Section? I think it would be a step in the right direction. We currently have three sections for posting code: Cool Uses for Perl (CUFP), Code Catacombs, and Snippets Section (this down from four — remember Craft?) Each of these sections uses a different node type for posts, and how they're meant to be used reflects their underlying node types.

    • CUFP nodes are "ordinary" nodes (i.e. they're just like Meditations, SoPW, PMD, Poetry, Tutorials, News, and Obfu nodes). The difference is only in the "semantics" of the nodes — how they're intended to be used. CUFP is for general code posting.

    • Code nodes are relatively complex, extending the "generic" node type with fields for category, description, and (now deprecated) contact info. The critical aspect here is the ability to categorize code posts, as can be seen at the top of Code Catacombs.

    • Snippet does not extend the generic posting node type, but instead extends the "universal" node type with unique fields, making compatibility with other sections of the site problematic. The fields don't even offer anything special — just two text blobs, for code and description — merely a subset of what's available with the Code node type. As an example of the incompatibility, note that a Snippet can only contain one <code> block.

    Add to that the fact that people continue to post inappropriate stuff in Snippets Section despite our best documentational efforts.

    Bottom line: Having the Snippets Section gives us nothing but redundancy and confusion. Anything that could go in Snippets could very reasonably go in Code or CUFP instead.

    For that matter, we could afford to shut down the CUFP section as well, because:

    1. There's no such thing, for practical purposes, as a post which isn't seen as a challenge by readers or used as a launching point for discussions. Therefore, CUFP is redundant with Meditations.

    2. The "Perl" in "Cool Uses For Perl" is an unfortunate and unnecessary restriction on the content of the section. We could rename the section, but it would be much less disruptive simply to redirect would-be CUFP posters elsewhere, e.g. to Meditations or the Catacombs, as appropriate. (If we really wanted to keep a separate section, but with a different name, but without renaming, we could reactivate Craft, as it is an "ordinary" section as well. )

    As a secondary matter — what about moving nodes from deprecated sections to active sections? It would be trivial, for example, to move Craft nodes to CUFP. If we deprecated Snippets Section, it would be possible (if not quite trivial) to move its existing posts to the Code Catacombs. This way, we wouldn't have loads of good old posts mouldering in these forgotten sections.

    (Relevant past discussions: Re: Visibility of code-like sections..., One Section to rule them all., The Plethora of Code Sections)

    A word spoken in Mind will reach its own level, in the objective world, by its own weight
perlhack and perlhacktut in Meditations
2 direct replies — Read more / Contribute
by jdporter
on Apr 03, 2008 at 20:58
Free Nodelet Hack: search internal code (pmdev only) in Perl Monks Discussion
No replies — Read more | Post response
by jdporter
on Feb 11, 2008 at 16:40

    Here's a couple of little things I have in my Free Nodelet for quickly searching for stuff in site code. The first is a link which searches immediately for the title of the current node - particularly useful if the current node is a htmlcode or something like that. The second is a form just like the one in Search internal code, but with no controls and no submit button; just hit <Enter> to submit the search (at least in most modern, sane browsers).

    <a href="/?node_id=157620;searchterms=`title%`">Search for <i>`title&` +</i> in code</a> <br/> <form method="post" action="?" enctype="application/x-www-form-urlenco +ded"> Search PM code: <input type="text" name="searchterms" size="40" id="codesearch"> <input type="hidden" name="node_id" value="157620"> <input type="hidden" name="sexisgood" value="submit"> </form>
    A word spoken in Mind will reach its own level, in the objective world, by its own weight
Code Catacombs "Contact Info" field useless in Perl Monks Discussion
3 direct replies — Read more / Contribute
by jdporter
on Jan 27, 2008 at 08:14

    I propose immediately deprecating the "Contact Info" field of the Code Catacombs node type — that is, removing it from the Code submission form and from the Code display page.

    In a huge preponderance of instances, the author either leaves the field blank or puts in their PerlMonks username. If the poster really wants to include other contact info, they can do so in the description field or in the code's embedded documentation, and in fact that is conventional for the kind of code this section is intended for. As it is, the section documentation says the Contact Info should be considered "very optional". Let's just get rid of it. It serves no useful purpose.

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