Beefy Boxes and Bandwidth Generously Provided by pair Networks
laziness, impatience, and hubris
 
PerlMonks  

perlman:perldiag2

by gods
on Aug 25, 1999 at 07:20 UTC ( #422=perlman: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??

perldiag2

Current Perl documentation can be found at perldoc.perl.org.

Here is our local, out-dated (pre-5.6) version:

Ill-formed logical name |%s| in prime_env_iter

(W) A warning peculiar to VMS. A logical name was encountered when preparing to iterate over %ENV which violates the syntactic rules governing logical names. Because it cannot be translated normally, it is skipped, and will not appear in %ENV. This may be a benign occurrence, as some software packages might directly modify logical name tables and introduce nonstandard names, or it may indicate that a logical name table has been corrupted.

Illegal character %s (carriage return)

(F) A carriage return character was found in the input. This is an error, and not a warning, because carriage return characters can break multi-line strings, including here documents (e.g., print <<EOF;).

Under Unix, this error is usually caused by executing Perl code -- either the main program, a module, or an eval'd string -- that was transferred over a network connection from a non-Unix system without properly converting the text file format.

Under systems that use something other than '\n' to delimit lines of text, this error can also be caused by reading Perl code from a file handle that is in binary mode (as set by the binmode operator).

In either case, the Perl code in question will probably need to be converted with something like s/\x0D\x0A?/\n/g before it can be executed.

Illegal division by zero

(F) You tried to divide a number by 0. Either something was wrong in your logic, or you need to put a conditional in to guard against meaningless input.

Illegal modulus zero

(F) You tried to divide a number by 0 to get the remainder. Most numbers don't take to this kindly.

Illegal octal digit

(F) You used an 8 or 9 in a octal number.

Illegal octal digit ignored

(W) You may have tried to use an 8 or 9 in a octal number. Interpretation of the octal number stopped before the 8 or 9.

Illegal hex digit ignored

(W) You may have tried to use a character other than 0 - 9 or A - F in a hexadecimal number. Interpretation of the hexadecimal number stopped before the illegal character.

Illegal switch in PERL5OPT: %s

(X) The PERL5OPT environment variable may only be used to set the following switches: -[DIMUdmw].

In string, @%s now must be written as \@%s

(F) It used to be that Perl would try to guess whether you wanted an array interpolated or a literal @. It did this when the string was first used at runtime. Now strings are parsed at compile time, and ambiguous instances of @ must be disambiguated, either by prepending a backslash to indicate a literal, or by declaring (or using) the array within the program before the string (lexically). (Someday it will simply assume that an unbackslashed @ interpolates an array.)

Insecure dependency in %s

(F) You tried to do something that the tainting mechanism didn't like. The tainting mechanism is turned on when you're running setuid or setgid, or when you specify -T to turn it on explicitly. The tainting mechanism labels all data that's derived directly or indirectly from the user, who is considered to be unworthy of your trust. If any such data is used in a ``dangerous'' operation, you get this error. See the perlsec manpage for more information.

Insecure directory in %s

(F) You can't use system(), exec(), or a piped open in a setuid or setgid script if $ENV{PATH} contains a directory that is writable by the world. See the perlsec manpage.

Insecure $ENV{%s} while running %s

(F) You can't use system(), exec(), or a piped open in a setuid or setgid script if any of $ENV{PATH}, $ENV{IFS}, $ENV{CDPATH}, $ENV{ENV} or $ENV{BASH_ENV} are derived from data supplied (or potentially supplied) by the user. The script must set the path to a known value, using trustworthy data. See the perlsec manpage.

Integer overflow in hex number

(S) The literal hex number you have specified is too big for your architecture. On a 32-bit architecture the largest hex literal is 0xFFFFFFFF.

Integer overflow in octal number

(S) The literal octal number you have specified is too big for your architecture. On a 32-bit architecture the largest octal literal is 037777777777.

Internal inconsistency in tracking vforks

(S) A warning peculiar to VMS. Perl keeps track of the number of times you've called fork and exec, to determine whether the current call to exec should affect the current script or a subprocess (see exec). Somehow, this count has become scrambled, so Perl is making a guess and treating this exec as a request to terminate the Perl script and execute the specified command.

internal disaster in regexp

(P) Something went badly wrong in the regular expression parser.

internal error: glob failed

(P) Something went wrong with the external program(s) used for glob and <*.c>. This may mean that your csh (C shell) is broken. If so, you should change all of the csh-related variables in config.sh: If you have tcsh, make the variables refer to it as if it were csh (e.g. full_csh='/usr/bin/tcsh'); otherwise, make them all empty (except that d_csh should be perlfunc:undef) so that Perl will think csh is missing. In either case, after editing config.sh, run ./Configure -S and rebuild Perl.

internal urp in regexp at /%s/

(P) Something went badly awry in the regular expression parser.

invalid [] range in regexp

(F) The range specified in a character class had a minimum character greater than the maximum character. See the perlre manpage.

Invalid conversion in %s: "%s"

(W) Perl does not understand the given format conversion. See sprintf.

Invalid type in pack: '%s'

(F) The given character is not a valid pack type. See pack. (W) The given character is not a valid pack type but used to be silently ignored.

Invalid type in unpack: '%s'

(F) The given character is not a valid unpack type. See unpack. (W) The given character is not a valid unpack type but used to be silently ignored.

ioctl is not implemented

(F) Your machine apparently doesn't implement ioctl(), which is pretty strange for a machine that supports C.

junk on end of regexp

(P) The regular expression parser is confused.

Label not found for "last %s"

(F) You named a loop to break out of, but you're not currently in a loop of that name, not even if you count where you were called from. See last.

Label not found for "next %s"

(F) You named a loop to continue, but you're not currently in a loop of that name, not even if you count where you were called from. See last.

Label not found for "redo %s"

(F) You named a loop to restart, but you're not currently in a loop of that name, not even if you count where you were called from. See last.

listen() on closed fd

(W) You tried to do a listen on a closed socket. Did you forget to check the return value of your socket() call? See listen.

Method for operation %s not found in package %s during blessing

(F) An attempt was made to specify an entry in an overloading table that doesn't resolve to a valid subroutine. See the overload manpage.

Might be a runaway multi-line %s string starting on line %d

(S) An advisory indicating that the previous error may have been caused by a missing delimiter on a string or pattern, because it eventually ended earlier on the current line.

Misplaced _ in number

(W) An underline in a decimal constant wasn't on a 3-digit boundary.

Missing $ on loop variable

(F) Apparently you've been programming in csh too much. Variables are always mentioned with the $ in Perl, unlike in the shells, where it can vary from one line to the next.

Missing comma after first argument to %s function

(F) While certain functions allow you to specify a filehandle or an ``indirect object'' before the argument list, this ain't one of them.

Missing operator before %s?

(S) This is an educated guess made in conjunction with the message ``%s found where operator expected''. Often the missing operator is a comma.

Missing right bracket

(F) The lexer counted more opening curly brackets (braces) than closing ones. As a general rule, you'll find it's missing near the place you were last editing.

Modification of a read-only value attempted

(F) You tried, directly or indirectly, to change the value of a constant. You didn't, of course, try ``2 = 1'', because the compiler catches that. But an easy way to do the same thing is:

    sub mod { $_[0] = 1 }
    mod(2);

Another way is to assign to a substr() that's off the end of the string.

Modification of non-creatable array value attempted, subscript %d

(F) You tried to make an array value spring into existence, and the subscript was probably negative, even counting from end of the array backwards.

Modification of non-creatable hash value attempted, subscript "%s"

(P) You tried to make a hash value spring into existence, and it couldn't be created for some peculiar reason.

Module name must be constant

(F) Only a bare module name is allowed as the first argument to a ``use''.

msg%s not implemented

(F) You don't have System V message IPC on your system.

Multidimensional syntax %s not supported

(W) Multidimensional arrays aren't written like $foo[1,2,3]. They're written like $foo[1][2][3], as in C.

Name "%s::%s" used only once: possible typo

(W) Typographical errors often show up as unique variable names. If you had a good reason for having a unique name, then just mention it again somehow to suppress the message. The use vars pragma is provided for just this purpose.

Negative length

(F) You tried to do a read/write/send/recv operation with a buffer length that is less than 0. This is difficult to imagine.

nested *?+ in regexp

(F) You can't quantify a quantifier without intervening parentheses. So things like ** or +* or ?* are illegal.

Note, however, that the minimal matching quantifiers, *?, +?, and ?? appear to be nested quantifiers, but aren't. See the perlre manpage.

No #! line

(F) The setuid emulator requires that scripts have a well-formed #! line even on machines that don't support the #! construct.

No %s allowed while running setuid

(F) Certain operations are deemed to be too insecure for a setuid or setgid script to even be allowed to attempt. Generally speaking there will be another way to do what you want that is, if not secure, at least securable. See the perlsec manpage.

No -e allowed in setuid scripts

(F) A setuid script can't be specified by the user.

No comma allowed after %s

(F) A list operator that has a filehandle or ``indirect object'' is not allowed to have a comma between that and the following arguments. Otherwise it'd be just another one of the arguments.

One possible cause for this is that you expected to have imported a constant to your name space with use or import while no such importing took place, it may for example be that your operating system does not support that particular constant. Hopefully you did use an explicit import list for the constants you expect to see, please see use and import. While an explicit import list would probably have caught this error earlier it naturally does not remedy the fact that your operating system still does not support that constant. Maybe you have a typo in the constants of the symbol import list of use or import or in the constant name at the line where this error was triggered?

No command into which to pipe on command line

(F) An error peculiar to VMS. Perl handles its own command line redirection, and found a '|' at the end of the command line, so it doesn't know where you want to pipe the output from this command.

No DB::DB routine defined

(F) The currently executing code was compiled with the -d switch, but for some reason the perl5db.pl file (or some facsimile thereof) didn't define a routine to be called at the beginning of each statement. Which is odd, because the file should have been required automatically, and should have blown up the require if it didn't parse right.

No dbm on this machine

(P) This is counted as an internal error, because every machine should supply dbm nowadays, because Perl comes with SDBM. See the SDBM_File manpage.

No DBsub routine

(F) The currently executing code was compiled with the -d switch, but for some reason the perl5db.pl file (or some facsimile thereof) didn't define a DB::sub routine to be called at the beginning of each ordinary subroutine call.

No error file after 2gt or 2gtgt on command line

(F) An error peculiar to VMS. Perl handles its own command line redirection, and found a '2>' or a '2>>' on the command line, but can't find the name of the file to which to write data destined for stderr.

No input file after lt on command line

(F) An error peculiar to VMS. Perl handles its own command line redirection, and found a '<' on the command line, but can't find the name of the file from which to read data for stdin.

No output file after gt on command line

(F) An error peculiar to VMS. Perl handles its own command line redirection, and found a lone '>' at the end of the command line, so it doesn't know where you wanted to redirect stdout.

No output file after gt or gtgt on command line

(F) An error peculiar to VMS. Perl handles its own command line redirection, and found a '>' or a '>>' on the command line, but can't find the name of the file to which to write data destined for stdout.

No Perl script found in input

(F) You called perl -x, but no line was found in the file beginning with #! and containing the word ``perl''.

No setregid available

(F) Configure didn't find anything resembling the setregid() call for your system.

No setreuid available

(F) Configure didn't find anything resembling the setreuid() call for your system.

No space allowed after -I

(F) The argument to -I must follow the -I immediately with no intervening space.

No such array field

(F) You tried to access an array as a hash, but the field name used is not defined. The hash at index 0 should map all valid field names to array indices for that to work.

No such field "%s" in variable %s of type %s

(F) You tried to access a field of a typed variable where the type does not know about the field name. The field names are looked up in the %FIELDS hash in the type package at compile time. The %FIELDS hash is usually set up with the 'fields' pragma.

No such pipe open

(P) An error peculiar to VMS. The internal routine my_pclose() tried to close a pipe which hadn't been opened. This should have been caught earlier as an attempt to close an unopened filehandle.

No such signal: SIG%s

(W) You specified a signal name as a subscript to %SIG that was not recognized. Say kill -l in your shell to see the valid signal names on your system.

Not a CODE reference

(F) Perl was trying to evaluate a reference to a code value (that is, a subroutine), but found a reference to something else instead. You can use the ref() function to find out what kind of ref it really was. See also the perlref manpage.

Not a format reference

(F) I'm not sure how you managed to generate a reference to an anonymous format, but this indicates you did, and that it didn't exist.

Not a GLOB reference

(F) Perl was trying to evaluate a reference to a ``typeglob'' (that is, a symbol table entry that looks like *foo), but found a reference to something else instead. You can use the ref() function to find out what kind of ref it really was. See the perlref manpage.

Not a HASH reference

(F) Perl was trying to evaluate a reference to a hash value, but found a reference to something else instead. You can use the ref() function to find out what kind of ref it really was. See the perlref manpage.

Not a perl script

(F) The setuid emulator requires that scripts have a well-formed #! line even on machines that don't support the #! construct. The line must mention perl.

Not a SCALAR reference

(F) Perl was trying to evaluate a reference to a scalar value, but found a reference to something else instead. You can use the ref() function to find out what kind of ref it really was. See the perlref manpage.

Not a subroutine reference

(F) Perl was trying to evaluate a reference to a code value (that is, a subroutine), but found a reference to something else instead. You can use the ref() function to find out what kind of ref it really was. See also the perlref manpage.

Not a subroutine reference in overload table

(F) An attempt was made to specify an entry in an overloading table that doesn't somehow point to a valid subroutine. See the overload manpage.

Not an ARRAY reference

(F) Perl was trying to evaluate a reference to an array value, but found a reference to something else instead. You can use the ref() function to find out what kind of ref it really was. See the perlref manpage.

Not enough arguments for %s

(F) The function requires more arguments than you specified.

Not enough format arguments

(W) A format specified more picture fields than the next line supplied. See the perlform manpage.

Null filename used

(F) You can't require the null filename, especially because on many machines that means the current directory! See require.

Null picture in formline

(F) The first argument to formline must be a valid format picture specification. It was found to be empty, which probably means you supplied it an uninitialized value. See the perlform manpage.

NULL OP IN RUN

(P) Some internal routine called run() with a null opcode pointer.

Null realloc

(P) An attempt was made to realloc NULL.

NULL regexp argument

(P) The internal pattern matching routines blew it big time.

NULL regexp parameter

(P) The internal pattern matching routines are out of their gourd.

Number too long

(F) Perl limits the representation of decimal numbers in programs to about about 250 characters. You've exceeded that length. Future versions of Perl are likely to eliminate this arbitrary limitation. In the meantime, try using scientific notation (e.g. ``1e6'' instead of ``1_000_000'').

Odd number of elements in hash assignment

(S) You specified an odd number of elements to initialize a hash, which is odd, because hashes come in key/value pairs.

Offset outside string

(F) You tried to do a read/write/send/recv operation with an offset pointing outside the buffer. This is difficult to imagine. The sole exception to this is that sysread()ing past the buffer will extend the buffer and zero pad the new area.

oops: oopsAV

(S) An internal warning that the grammar is screwed up.

oops: oopsHV

(S) An internal warning that the grammar is screwed up.

Operation `%s': no method found, %s

(F) An attempt was made to perform an overloaded operation for which no handler was defined. While some handlers can be autogenerated in terms of other handlers, there is no default handler for any operation, unless fallback overloading key is specified to be true. See the overload manpage.

Operator or semicolon missing before %s

(S) You used a variable or subroutine call where the parser was expecting an operator. The parser has assumed you really meant to use an operator, but this is highly likely to be incorrect. For example, if you say ``*foo *foo'' it will be interpreted as if you said ``*foo * 'foo'''.

Out of memory for yacc stack

(F) The yacc parser wanted to grow its stack so it could continue parsing, but realloc() wouldn't give it more memory, virtual or otherwise.

Out of memory during request for %s

(X|F) The malloc() function returned 0, indicating there was insufficient remaining memory (or virtual memory) to satisfy the request.

The request was judged to be small, so the possibility to trap it depends on the way perl was compiled. By default it is not trappable. However, if compiled for this, Perl may use the contents of $^M as an emergency pool after die()ing with this message. In this case the error is trappable once.

Out of memory during "large" request for %s

(F) The malloc() function returned 0, indicating there was insufficient remaining memory (or virtual memory) to satisfy the request. However, the request was judged large enough (compile-time default is 64K), so a possibility to shut down by trapping this error is granted.

Out of memory during ridiculously large request

(F) You can't allocate more than 2^31+``small amount'' bytes. This error is most likely to be caused by a typo in the Perl program. e.g., $arr[time] instead of $arr[$time].

page overflow

(W) A single call to write() produced more lines than can fit on a page. See the perlform manpage.

panic: ck_grep

(P) Failed an internal consistency check trying to compile a grep.

panic: ck_split

(P) Failed an internal consistency check trying to compile a split.

panic: corrupt saved stack index

(P) The savestack was requested to restore more localized values than there are in the savestack.

panic: die %s

(P) We popped the context stack to an eval context, and then discovered it wasn't an eval context.

panic: do_match

(P) The internal pp_match() routine was called with invalid operational data.

panic: do_split

(P) Something terrible went wrong in setting up for the split.

panic: do_subst

(P) The internal pp_subst() routine was called with invalid operational data.

panic: do_trans

(P) The internal do_trans() routine was called with invalid operational data.

panic: frexp

(P) The library function frexp() failed, making printf(``%f'') impossible.

panic: goto

(P) We popped the context stack to a context with the specified label, and then discovered it wasn't a context we know how to do a goto in.

panic: INTERPCASEMOD

(P) The lexer got into a bad state at a case modifier.

panic: INTERPCONCAT

(P) The lexer got into a bad state parsing a string with brackets.

panic: last

(P) We popped the context stack to a block context, and then discovered it wasn't a block context.

panic: leave_scope clearsv

(P) A writable lexical variable became read-only somehow within the scope.

panic: leave_scope inconsistency

(P) The savestack probably got out of sync. At least, there was an invalid enum on the top of it.

panic: malloc

(P) Something requested a negative number of bytes of malloc.

panic: mapstart

(P) The compiler is screwed up with respect to the map() function.

panic: null array

(P) One of the internal array routines was passed a null AV pointer.

panic: pad_alloc

(P) The compiler got confused about which scratch pad it was allocating and freeing temporaries and lexicals from.

panic: pad_free curpad

(P) The compiler got confused about which scratch pad it was allocating and freeing temporaries and lexicals from.

panic: pad_free po

(P) An invalid scratch pad offset was detected internally.

panic: pad_reset curpad

(P) The compiler got confused about which scratch pad it was allocating and freeing temporaries and lexicals from.

panic: pad_sv po

(P) An invalid scratch pad offset was detected internally.

panic: pad_swipe curpad

(P) The compiler got confused about which scratch pad it was allocating and freeing temporaries and lexicals from.

panic: pad_swipe po

(P) An invalid scratch pad offset was detected internally.

panic: pp_iter

(P) The foreach iterator got called in a non-loop context frame.

panic: realloc

(P) Something requested a negative number of bytes of realloc.

panic: restartop

(P) Some internal routine requested a goto (or something like it), and didn't supply the destination.

panic: return

(P) We popped the context stack to a subroutine or eval context, and then discovered it wasn't a subroutine or eval context.

panic: scan_num

(P) scan_num() got called on something that wasn't a number.

panic: sv_insert

(P) The sv_insert() routine was told to remove more string than there was string.

panic: top_env

(P) The compiler attempted to do a goto, or something weird like that.

panic: yylex

(P) The lexer got into a bad state while processing a case modifier.

Parentheses missing around "%s" list

(W) You said something like

    my $foo, $bar = @_;

when you meant

    my ($foo, $bar) = @_;

Remember that ``my'' and ``local'' bind closer than comma.

Perl %3.3f required--this is only version %s, stopped

(F) The module in question uses features of a version of Perl more recent than the currently running version. How long has it been since you upgraded, anyway? See require.

Permission denied

(F) The setuid emulator in suidperl decided you were up to no good.

pid %d not a child

(W) A warning peculiar to VMS. Waitpid() was asked to wait for a process which isn't a subprocess of the current process. While this is fine from VMS' perspective, it's probably not what you intended.

POSIX getpgrp can't take an argument

(F) Your C compiler uses POSIX getpgrp(), which takes no argument, unlike the BSD version, which takes a pid.

Possible attempt to put comments in qw() list

(W) qw() lists contain items separated by whitespace; as with literal strings, comment characters are not ignored, but are instead treated as literal data. (You may have used different delimiters than the parentheses shown here; braces are also frequently used.)

You probably wrote something like this:

    @list = qw(
        a # a comment
        b # another comment
    );

when you should have written this:

    @list = qw(
        a
        b
    );

If you really want comments, build your list the old-fashioned way, with quotes and commas:

    @list = (
        'a',    # a comment
        'b',    # another comment
    );
Possible attempt to separate words with commas

(W) qw() lists contain items separated by whitespace; therefore commas aren't needed to separate the items. (You may have used different delimiters than the parentheses shown here; braces are also frequently used.)

You probably wrote something like this:

    qw! a, b, c !;

which puts literal commas into some of the list items. Write it without commas if you don't want them to appear in your data:

    qw! a b c !;
Possible memory corruption: %s overflowed 3rd argument

(F) An ioctl() or fcntl() returned more than Perl was bargaining for. Perl guesses a reasonable buffer size, but puts a sentinel byte at the end of the buffer just in case. This sentinel byte got clobbered, and Perl assumes that memory is now corrupted. See ioctl.

Precedence problem: open %s should be open(%s)

(S) The old irregular construct

    open FOO || die;

is now misinterpreted as

    open(FOO || die);

because of the strict regularization of Perl 5's grammar into unary and list operators. (The old open was a little of both.) You must put parentheses around the filehandle, or use the new ``or'' operator instead of ``||''.

print on closed filehandle %s

(W) The filehandle you're printing on got itself closed sometime before now. Check your logic flow.

printf on closed filehandle %s

(W) The filehandle you're writing to got itself closed sometime before now. Check your logic flow.

Probable precedence problem on %s

(W) The compiler found a bareword where it expected a conditional, which often indicates that an || or && was parsed as part of the last argument of the previous construct, for example:

    open FOO || die;
Prototype mismatch: %s vs %s

(S) The subroutine being declared or defined had previously been declared or defined with a different function prototype.

Range iterator outside integer range

(F) One (or both) of the numeric arguments to the range operator ``..'' are outside the range which can be represented by integers internally. One possible workaround is to force Perl to use magical string increment by prepending ``0'' to your numbers.

Read on closed filehandle lt%sgt

(W) The filehandle you're reading from got itself closed sometime before now. Check your logic flow.

Reallocation too large: %lx

(F) You can't allocate more than 64K on an MS-DOS machine.

Recompile perl with -DDEBUGGING to use -D switch

(F) You can't use the -D option unless the code to produce the desired output is compiled into Perl, which entails some overhead, which is why it's currently left out of your copy.

Recursive inheritance detected in package '%s'

(F) More than 100 levels of inheritance were used. Probably indicates an unintended loop in your inheritance hierarchy.

Recursive inheritance detected while looking for method '%s' in package '%s'

(F) More than 100 levels of inheritance were encountered while invoking a method. Probably indicates an unintended loop in your inheritance hierarchy.

Reference found where even-sized list expected

(W) You gave a single reference where Perl was expecting a list with an even number of elements (for assignment to a hash). This usually means that you used the anon hash constructor when you meant to use parens. In any case, a hash requires key/value pairs.

    %hash = { one => 1, two => 2, };    # WRONG
    %hash = [ qw/ an anon array / ];    # WRONG
    %hash = ( one => 1, two => 2, );    # right
    %hash = qw( one 1 two 2 );                  # also fine
Reference miscount in sv_replace()

(W) The internal sv_replace() function was handed a new SV with a reference count of other than 1.

regexp *+ operand could be empty

(F) The part of the regexp subject to either the * or + quantifier could match an empty string.

regexp memory corruption

(P) The regular expression engine got confused by what the regular expression compiler gave it.

regexp out of space

(P) A ``can't happen'' error, because safemalloc() should have caught it earlier.

regexp too big

(F) The current implementation of regular expressions uses shorts as address offsets within a string. Unfortunately this means that if the regular expression compiles to longer than 32767, it'll blow up. Usually when you want a regular expression this big, there is a better way to do it with multiple statements. See the perlre manpage.

Reversed %s= operator

(W) You wrote your assignment operator backwards. The = must always comes last, to avoid ambiguity with subsequent unary operators.

Runaway format

(F) Your format contained the ~~ repeat-until-blank sequence, but it produced 200 lines at once, and the 200th line looked exactly like the 199th line. Apparently you didn't arrange for the arguments to exhaust themselves, either by using ^ instead of @ (for scalar variables), or by shifting or popping (for array variables). See the perlform manpage.

Scalar value @%s[%s] better written as $%s[%s]

(W) You've used an array slice (indicated by @) to select a single element of an array. Generally it's better to ask for a scalar value (indicated by $). The difference is that $foo[&bar] always behaves like a scalar, both when assigning to it and when evaluating its argument, while @foo[&bar] behaves like a list when you assign to it, and provides a list context to its subscript, which can do weird things if you're expecting only one subscript.

On the other hand, if you were actually hoping to treat the array element as a list, you need to look into how references work, because Perl will not magically convert between scalars and lists for you. See the perlref manpage.

Scalar value @%s{%s} better written as $%s{%s}

(W) You've used a hash slice (indicated by @) to select a single element of a hash. Generally it's better to ask for a scalar value (indicated by $). The difference is that $foo{&bar} always behaves like a scalar, both when assigning to it and when evaluating its argument, while @foo{&bar} behaves like a list when you assign to it, and provides a list context to its subscript, which can do weird things if you're expecting only one subscript.

On the other hand, if you were actually hoping to treat the hash element as a list, you need to look into how references work, because Perl will not magically convert between scalars and lists for you. See the perlref manpage.

Script is not setuid/setgid in suidperl

(F) Oddly, the suidperl program was invoked on a script without a setuid or setgid bit set. This doesn't make much sense.

Search pattern not terminated

(F) The lexer couldn't find the final delimiter of a // or m{} construct. Remember that bracketing delimiters count nesting level. Missing the leading $ from a variable perlman:perlop may cause this error.

%sseek() on unopened file

(W) You tried to use the seek() or sysseek() function on a filehandle that was either never opened or has since been closed.

select not implemented

(F) This machine doesn't implement the select() system call.

sem%s not implemented

(F) You don't have System V semaphore IPC on your system.

semi-panic: attempt to dup freed string

(S) The internal newSVsv() routine was called to duplicate a scalar that had previously been marked as free.

Semicolon seems to be missing

(W) A nearby syntax error was probably caused by a missing semicolon, or possibly some other missing operator, such as a comma.

Send on closed socket

(W) The filehandle you're sending to got itself closed sometime before now. Check your logic flow.

Sequence (? incomplete

(F) A regular expression ended with an incomplete extension (?. See the perlre manpage.

Sequence (?#... not terminated

(F) A regular expression comment must be terminated by a closing parenthesis. Embedded parentheses aren't allowed. See the perlre manpage.

Sequence (?%s...) not implemented

(F) A proposed regular expression extension has the character reserved but has not yet been written. See the perlre manpage.

Sequence (?%s...) not recognized

(F) You used a regular expression extension that doesn't make sense. See the perlre manpage.

Server error

Also known as ``500 Server error''.

This is a CGI error, not a Perl error.

You need to make sure your script is executable, is accessible by the user CGI is running the script under (which is probably not the user account you tested it under), does not rely on any environment variables (like PATH) from the user it isn't running under, and isn't in a location where the CGI server can't find it, basically, more or less. Please see the following for more information:

        http://www.perl.com/perl/faq/idiots-guide.html
        http://www.perl.com/perl/faq/perl-cgi-faq.html
        ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/www/cgi-faq
        http://hoohoo.ncsa.uiuc.edu/cgi/interface.html
        http://www-genome.wi.mit.edu/WWW/faqs/www-security-faq.html
setegid() not implemented

(F) You tried to assign to $), and your operating system doesn't support the setegid() system call (or equivalent), or at least Configure didn't think so.

seteuid() not implemented

(F) You tried to assign to $>, and your operating system doesn't support the seteuid() system call (or equivalent), or at least Configure didn't think so.

setrgid() not implemented

(F) You tried to assign to $(, and your operating system doesn't support the setrgid() system call (or equivalent), or at least Configure didn't think so.

setruid() not implemented

(F) You tried to assign to $<, and your operating system doesn't support the setruid() system call (or equivalent), or at least Configure didn't think so.

Setuid/gid script is writable by world

(F) The setuid emulator won't run a script that is writable by the world, because the world might have written on it already.

shm%s not implemented

(F) You don't have System V shared memory IPC on your system.

shutdown() on closed fd

(W) You tried to do a shutdown on a closed socket. Seems a bit superfluous.

SIG%s handler "%s" not defined

(W) The signal handler named in %SIG doesn't, in fact, exist. Perhaps you put it into the wrong package?

sort is now a reserved word

(F) An ancient error message that almost nobody ever runs into anymore. But before sort was a keyword, people sometimes used it as a filehandle.

Sort subroutine didn't return a numeric value

(F) A sort comparison routine must return a number. You probably blew it by not using <=> or cmp, or by not using them correctly. See sort.

Sort subroutine didn't return single value

(F) A sort comparison subroutine may not return a list value with more or less than one element. See sort.

Split loop

(P) The split was looping infinitely. (Obviously, a split shouldn't iterate more times than there are characters of input, which is what happened.) See split.

Stat on unopened file lt%sgt

(W) You tried to use the stat() function (or an equivalent file test) on a filehandle that was either never opened or has since been closed.

Statement unlikely to be reached

(W) You did an exec() with some statement after it other than a die(). This is almost always an error, because exec() never returns unless there was a failure. You probably wanted to use system() instead, which does return. To suppress this warning, put the exec() in a block by itself.

Stub found while resolving method `%s' overloading `%s' in package `%s'

(P) Overloading resolution over @ISA tree may be broken by importation stubs. Stubs should never be implicitely created, but explicit calls to can may break this.

Subroutine %s redefined

(W) You redefined a subroutine. To suppress this warning, say

    {
        local $^W = 0;
        eval "sub name { ... }";
    }
Substitution loop

(P) The substitution was looping infinitely. (Obviously, a substitution shouldn't iterate more times than there are characters of input, which is what happened.) See the discussion of substitution in perlman:perlop.

Substitution pattern not terminated

(F) The lexer couldn't find the interior delimiter of a s/// or s{}{} construct. Remember that bracketing delimiters count nesting level. Missing the leading $ from variable perlman:perlop may cause this error.

Substitution replacement not terminated

(F) The lexer couldn't find the final delimiter of a s/// or s{}{} construct. Remember that bracketing delimiters count nesting level. Missing the leading $ from variable perlman:perlop may cause this error.

substr outside of string

(S),(W) You tried to reference a substr() that pointed outside of a string. That is, the absolute value of the offset was larger than the length of the string. See substr. This warning is mandatory if substr is used in an lvalue context (as the left hand side of an assignment or as a subroutine argument for example).

suidperl is no longer needed since %s

(F) Your Perl was compiled with -D SETUID_SCRIPTS_ARE_SECURE_NOW, but a version of the setuid emulator somehow got run anyway.

syntax error

(F) Probably means you had a syntax error. Common reasons include:

    A keyword is misspelled.
    A semicolon is missing.
    A comma is missing.
    An opening or closing parenthesis is missing.
    An opening or closing brace is missing.
    A closing quote is missing.

Often there will be another error message associated with the syntax error giving more information. (Sometimes it helps to turn on -w.) The error message itself often tells you where it was in the line when it decided to give up. Sometimes the actual error is several tokens before this, because Perl is good at understanding random input. Occasionally the line number may be misleading, and once in a blue moon the only way to figure out what's triggering the error is to call perl -c repeatedly, chopping away half the program each time to see if the error went away. Sort of the cybernetic version of 20 questions.

syntax error at line %d: `%s' unexpected

(A) You've accidentally run your script through the Bourne shell instead of Perl. Check the #! line, or manually feed your script into Perl yourself.

System V %s is not implemented on this machine

(F) You tried to do something with a function beginning with ``sem'', ``shm'', or ``msg'' but that System V IPC is not implemented in your machine. In some machines the functionality can exist but be unconfigured. Consult your system support.

Syswrite on closed filehandle

(W) The filehandle you're writing to got itself closed sometime before now. Check your logic flow.

Target of goto is too deeply nested

(F) You tried to use goto to reach a label that was too deeply nested for Perl to reach. Perl is doing you a favor by refusing.

tell() on unopened file

(W) You tried to use the tell() function on a filehandle that was either never opened or has since been closed.

Test on unopened file lt%sgt

(W) You tried to invoke a file test operator on a filehandle that isn't open. Check your logic. See also -X.

That use of $[ is unsupported

(F) Assignment to $[ is now strictly circumscribed, and interpreted as a compiler directive. You may say only one of

    $[ = 0;
    $[ = 1;
    ...
    local $[ = 0;
    local $[ = 1;
    ...

This is to prevent the problem of one module changing the array base out from under another module inadvertently. See perlman:perlvar.

The %s function is unimplemented

The function indicated isn't implemented on this architecture, according to the probings of Configure.

The crypt() function is unimplemented due to excessive paranoia

(F) Configure couldn't find the crypt() function on your machine, probably because your vendor didn't supply it, probably because they think the U.S. Government thinks it's a secret, or at least that they will continue to pretend that it is. And if you quote me on that, I will deny it.

The stat preceding -l _ wasn't an lstat

(F) It makes no sense to test the current stat buffer for symbolic linkhood if the last stat that wrote to the stat buffer already went past the symlink to get to the real file. Use an actual filename instead.

times not implemented

(F) Your version of the C library apparently doesn't do times(). I suspect you're not running on Unix.

Too few args to syscall

(F) There has to be at least one argument to syscall() to specify the system call to call, silly dilly.

Too late for "-T" option

(X) The #! line (or local equivalent) in a Perl script contains the -T option, but Perl was not invoked with -T in its command line. This is an error because, by the time Perl discovers a -T in a script, it's too late to properly taint everything from the environment. So Perl gives up.

If the Perl script is being executed as a command using the #! mechanism (or its local equivalent), this error can usually be fixed by editing the #! line so that the -T option is a part of Perl's first argument: e.g. change perl -n -T to perl -T -n.

If the Perl script is being executed as perl scriptname, then the -T option must appear on the command line: perl -T scriptname.

Too late for "-%s" option

(X) The #! line (or local equivalent) in a Perl script contains the -M or -m option. This is an error because -M and -m options are not intended for use inside scripts. Use the use pragma instead.

Too many ('s
Too many )'s

(A) You've accidentally run your script through csh instead of Perl. Check the #! line, or manually feed your script into Perl yourself.

Too many args to syscall

(F) Perl supports a maximum of only 14 args to syscall().

Too many arguments for %s

(F) The function requires fewer arguments than you specified.

trailing \ in regexp

(F) The regular expression ends with an unbackslashed backslash. Backslash it. See the perlre manpage.

Transliteration pattern not terminated

(F) The lexer couldn't find the interior delimiter of a tr/// or tr[][] or y/// or y[][] construct. Missing the leading $ from variables perlman:perlop or perlman:perlop may cause this error.

Transliteration replacement not terminated

(F) The lexer couldn't find the final delimiter of a tr/// or tr[][] construct.

truncate not implemented

(F) Your machine doesn't implement a file truncation mechanism that Configure knows about.

Type of arg %d to %s must be %s (not %s)

(F) This function requires the argument in that position to be of a certain type. Arrays must be @NAME or @{EXPR}. Hashes must be %NAME or %{EXPR}. No implicit dereferencing is allowed--use the {EXPR} forms as an explicit dereference. See the perlref manpage.
More...

Return to the Library
Log In?
Username:
Password:

What's my password?
Create A New User
Chatterbox?
and the web crawler heard nothing...

How do I use this? | Other CB clients
Other Users?
Others lurking in the Monastery: (6)
As of 2014-08-29 03:32 GMT
Sections?
Information?
Find Nodes?
Leftovers?
    Voting Booth?

    The best computer themed movie is:











    Results (275 votes), past polls