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Re: Difference between my $self = shift and my ($self) = @_

by topher (Scribe)
on Feb 22, 2013 at 06:27 UTC ( #1020075=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Difference between my $self = shift and my ($self) = @_

As tobyink pointed out, there's no difference in what ends up in $self, but there is a big difference in what's left in @_. If your subroutine isn't expecting arguments, then you can use either method without concern. If you are going to be taking arguments, then you have a choice to make.

Personally, I'm a big fan of using my $self = shift;. For me, it makes the code cleaner and more mentally straightforward. When using shift, the contents of @_ end up being exactly the same as the arguments I passed to the subroutine. If I use assignment from @_, then I have to constantly account for that $self at the first position, complicating things.


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