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Re: no server response required

by sundialsvc4 (Abbot)
on Nov 19, 2013 at 14:24 UTC ( #1063339=note: print w/replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to no server response required

(I am taking for granted that the OP is addressing a Perl-based CGI or FastCGI handler ... therefore, that the question is being asked in an appropriate venue.)

It is my understanding that requests issued, at least to Apache, must be replied-to.   You might be able to use a different HTTP server, but actually, I think this is a requirement of the HTTP protocol.   (I'd be a little surprised if your browser didn’t get upset about it, too ...)

Can you perhaps return 204 No Content?   (See:   this WikiPedia page...)   Now, you are fulfilling the handshake obligation of the protocol, but saying that there is nothing else to say.

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[davido]: or on ubuntu /var/run/utmp
[Corion]: Otherwise, I would imagine that a user with a process still alive would lock that information in memory.
[davido]: so last -f /var/run/utmp on ubuntu provides similar (though more verbose) info
[oiskuu]: glibc getlogin just does ttyname() and falls back on getutline(); it's not security related at all. (reminds me of sendmail and remote finger services of the naive early spam era)
[Corion]: But yes, "who started this process" is interesting information :)
[tye]: no, I really believe that "login user" was added as a fundamental bit of info about each process in order to enhance the usefulness of auditing
[Corion]: Ah - if that information is saved in a file, then you could theoretically spam that file and confuse getlogin(). So, don't use it for authentication :)
[tye]: that is what getlogin() certainly *used* to do. I don't believe that is what it certainly should do.
[davido]: /var/run/utmp is 664 i think.
[tye]: Note that my "man getlogin" says that it uses stdin when it should use /dev/tty (calling a glibc bug). But that does not appear to be the case when I test it. But maybe Perl's getlogin() is not using glibc's getlogin().

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