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old code revisited

by neophyte (Curate)
on Sep 08, 2001 at 17:23 UTC ( #111156=perlmeditation: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??

In the section Q&A under Is there a shorter way to create a german time string? I posted some code that's still running in some of my older scripts. Yesterday I got back to the snippet in a printed version and wondered.
I knew I did a benchmark with using localtime and Date::Manip and performance didn't differ significantly for me. Now I still wondered if I could make that code more efficient.
So I tried the following benchmark:
#! /usr/bin/perl -w use strict; use Benchmark qw(timethese); sub zeit_mit_func { # old function calling localtime several times (slightly modified) my $wtag = ("So","Mo","Di","Mi","Do","Fr","Sa")[(localtime)[6]]; my $mtag = sprintf("%02d", (localtime)[3]); my $monat = sprintf("%02d", (localtime)[4]+1); my $jahr = (localtime)[5] + 1900; my $stunde = sprintf("%02d", (localtime)[2]); my $minute = sprintf("%02d", (localtime)[1]); my $zeit = "$wtag $mtag\.$monat\.$jahr - $stunde\:$minute"; return $zeit; } sub zeit_mit_array { # new function calling localtime only once assigning it to an array my @zeit = localtime; my $wtag = ("So","Mo","Di","Mi","Do","Fr","Sa")[$zeit[6]]; my $mtag = sprintf("%02d", $zeit[3]); my $monat = sprintf("%02d", $zeit[4]+1); my $jahr = $zeit[5] + 1900; my $stunde = sprintf("%02d", $zeit[2]); my $minute = sprintf("%02d", $zeit[1]); my $zeit = "$wtag $mtag\.$monat\.$jahr - $stunde\:$minute"; return $zeit; } timethese (1E5, { 'func' => \&zeit_mit_func, 'array' => \&zeit_mit_array, });
The result was (as I had expected)
Benchmark: timing 100000 iterations of array, func... array: 11 wallclock secs (10.82 usr + 0.00 sys = 10.82 CPU) @ 92 +42.14/s (n=100000) func: 33 wallclock secs (32.68 usr + 0.00 sys = 32.68 CPU) @ 30 +59.98/s (n=100000)
on a WinME with ActivePerl Build 628. I also tested it on a FreeBSD 4.0, Perl 5.005 on an old notebook, where the difference was even more significant.

So this is to show - never trust old code. Don't get into the habit of copy and paste.
Make it a habit to review old code, It'll do your code and your coding expertise good.
It already has helped me gain some insights - and I'm sure it'll continue doing so.

neophyte Niederrhein.pm

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Re: old code revisited
by myocom (Deacon) on Sep 08, 2001 at 19:17 UTC

    Also, it's best to call localtime only once and do your manipulations on that (as you did in the array version). If your function version had started at 23:59:59 and took any longer to run than a second, your results would have been wonky. Looks like you got lucky all this time. :-)

    "One word of warning: if you meet a bunch of Perl programmers on the bus or something, don't look them in the eye. They've been known to try to convert the young into Perl monks." - Frank Willison
Re: old code revisited
by Albannach (Prior) on Sep 08, 2001 at 20:03 UTC
    Make it a habit to review old code, It'll do your code and your coding expertise good.

    Indeed! This doesn't just apply to copy and paste either, as I often find things that can be done better or simply coded more clearly when I pull out some little program I wrote 6 months ago. I take the fact that I'm using it a second time as a sign that a little more investment of effort could well pay off in the future. Recently I have found myself replacing silly little loops with map or grep (as appropriate) and finding the clarity of the code improves significantly.

    On your specific example, you could go a step farther and eliminate the multiple sprintf calls. On my box (Win95, ActiveState 628) this appears to be 20% faster than the array improvement alone:

    sub zeit_mit_Albannach { # new function calling sprintf only once my @zeit = localtime; my $wtag = ("So","Mo","Di","Mi","Do","Fr","Sa")[$zeit[6]]; sprintf("$wtag %02d.%02d.%4d - %02d:%02d", $zeit[3], $zeit[4]+1, $zeit[5] + 1900, $zeit[2], $zeit[1]); }

    --
    I'd like to be able to assign to an luser

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