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The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...

by ww (Archbishop)
on Aug 02, 2015 at 13:09 UTC ( #1137169=poll: print w/replies, xml ) Need Help??

vote on The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...

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Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by LanX (Bishop) on Aug 02, 2015 at 18:25 UTC
    The Tex Book

    Donald Knuth

    1984

    (I also have the K&R C book¹- xeroxed in the 80s - but never really read it :)

    Cheers Rolf
    (addicted to the Perl Programming Language and ☆☆☆☆ :)
    Je suis Charlie!

    ¹) 1st edition

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by afoken (Abbot) on Aug 02, 2015 at 17:58 UTC

    Independant:

    "DOS 5 für Programmierer" by Arne Schäpers (ISBN 3893193502), dated 1991. It's actually a much enhanced german translation of "Undocumented DOS" by Andrew Schulman et al.

    Coming with a product:

    Turbo Pascal 6 with printed documentation, dated 1990

    MS-DOS 4.01 printed documentation, copyrighted 1987-1989

    Just bits and bytes:

    Turbo C 2.01, file dates from 1989, with scanned Manual (1987) and Reference Guide (1988). Downloaded just a few weeks ago to play with virtual DOS machines.

    Alexander

    --
    Today I will gladly share my knowledge and experience, for there are no sweeter words than "I told you so". ;-)
Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by erix (Parson) on Aug 03, 2015 at 00:08 UTC

    Scanning the shelves:

    1965: "a Pelican Original" A524:

    Electronic Computers
    S.H.Hollingdale and G.C.Tootill
    1965
    
    Programming RPG RPG II
    Harice Seeds
    1971
    
    Algol 68
    a first and second course
    Andrew D. McGettrick
    1978
    
    The Architecture of Digital Computers
    R.G. Garside
    1980
    
    Structured Computer Organisation (second ed.)
    Andrew S. Tanenbaum
    1984
    
    Several Oracle 6 (1988) manuals

    And so on and so forth :)

    For some of my books, when I squint at them for just a bit longer than a second, I feel again the joy of reading them, understanding them, long ago.

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by planetscape (Chancellor) on Aug 02, 2015 at 13:27 UTC

    Would have to be something for the Commodore VIC-20. More like in storage (in a closet) than on my shelf, but no, I haven't got rid of it. (Dragons are, by nature, hoarders. ;-))

    HTH,

    planetscape
      Come to think it, mine would also be related to Commodore as well, but would be about the C64 instead. Still have a lot of magazines with basic and assembly language code snippets. And the things people are still using that machine for....

        Indeed!

        Sadly I lost many old Byte, Compute, etc. magazines when the lower levels of my cavern flooded...

        I bet you remember typing in lines and lines of numbers with checksums from Compute! books that represented machine-language programs fed to a special loader coded in BASIC... ;-)

        HTH,

        planetscape
Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by blue_cowdawg (Monsignor) on Aug 03, 2015 at 19:43 UTC

    Do punch cards count as digital media? Finally got rid of the last of those when I was cleaning house making room for my dad to move in.

    There are several mag tape reels in my one closet, some DC100 tapes of various types, 5-inch floppies, 3-inch floppies, a couple of 8-inch floppies and some zip drives.

    That's the digital stuff

    I have a book on Unix internals that dates back to sometime before I started working at Bell Labs in 1989, The Zen and Art of USENET, a book on how the USENET backbone is connected, a book from (3M? Xerox?) about "Ethernet."

    One of my favorite possessions (well worn and marked on) is Volume I Issue 1 of Byte Magazine.

    All sorts of magazines dating back to the beginnings of the microprocessor revolution. I may even have the original plans for an Intel 8008 based computer which was my first real computer project.

    I might even still have my book on Fortran IV from when I was in High School. I tossed my COBOL book deciding I'm never going to look at that horrible language ever again.

    Memories... lots of them...


    Peter L. Berghold -- Unix Professional
    Peter -at- Berghold -dot- Net; Blog: http://blog.berghold.net Warning: No political correctness allowed.

      In my first programming job I was handed a copy of "Guide to Fortran IV Programming" by Daniel D McCracken (1973) to learn from but, sadly, it wasn't mine to keep so isn't on my shelves. They did send me on a training course as well after a few months :-)

      Cheers,

      JohnGG

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by BillKSmith (Vicar) on Aug 03, 2015 at 13:48 UTC

    I also am a hoarder, but a recent move forced me to discard all my FORTRAN, PASCAL, and SYSTEM 360 books. I no longer remember the name, but the oldest of them described a version of FORTRAN which predated the 1966 standard.

    The oldest book to survive the cut is Structured Design . Its advice remains valuable for any non-trivial program.

    Bill
Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by Tux (Abbot) on Aug 03, 2015 at 15:38 UTC

    Side-by-side I saw

    • "The C programming Language" (1978)
    • "HP 3000 Computer Systems MPE software pocket guide" (1981)
    • the two volumes of "System V Interface definition" (1986) (fallen apart from how often it was used)
    • "MC68020 32bit Microprocessor User's Manual" (1984)
    • "Uniplex II plus" (1986)
    • "ANS-Cobol" (1974)
    • "The Unix System" (1983) by Bourne

    IIRC there must be a three-volume set of nice blue bound books with the System III manual


    Enjoy, Have FUN! H.Merijn
Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by jdporter (Canon) on Oct 04, 2015 at 18:35 UTC

    (LISP 1.5 PRIMER
      (BY
        (CLARK WEISSMAN)))
    Yes, that's the actual title... 1967!

    Update: Upon reflection, I guess it's a little disingenuous to suggest that it's "still" on my shelf, since I acquired it some time quite at bit later than 1967...

    I reckon we are the only monastery ever to have a dungeon stuffed with 16,000 zombies.
      "...the actual title... 1967"

      May i ask if you read it in this year?

      But please wait before you implode and read the current poll ;-)

      Best regards, Karl

      «The Crux of the Biscuit is the Apostrophe»

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by johngg (Abbot) on Aug 02, 2015 at 22:20 UTC

    I think the oldest I have is "Pascal User Manual And Report" 2nd edition, Jensen & Wirth of 1975. I do have an ICL 1900 Cobol quick reference card stashed away somewhere but I've no idea why I've kept it as the last time I wrote a Cobol program was in 1984!

    Cheers,

    JohnGG

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by ww (Archbishop) on Aug 03, 2015 at 00:43 UTC

    In the interest of full disclosure (or maybe it's second or third level bragging rights), (/me reddens) TheSource User's Manual (well, its brown, thick, three-ring binder which has, admittedly, been re-purposed) still holds a place on the shelves above my router (a device of which few of us even dreamed when TheSource was in business)... as does my beloved (and much tattered) Z80 Assembly Language Programming, Leventhal, et al.

    ... and in a further admission of guilt, I failed in my efforts to find links with pictures of documentation for my PDP-11... or of its GIGUNDO, IMMENSE, HUGE 5 !!!! Meg HD with removable 10-inch platters (that drew nearly 20 amps on startup)... or it's 1-inch tape drive (recording, IIRC, at about the same pace as data flowed thru a 300 baud modem)   until, much belatedly, I stumbled upon this from M$, yet!

    Of course, that one deals with the 11-10 and 11-20... but there is a readily recognizable DEC logo on the cover.

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by choroba (Bishop) on Aug 02, 2015 at 23:30 UTC
    Jack Purdum, C Programming Guide, 1983.
    لսႽ† ᥲᥒ⚪⟊Ⴙᘓᖇ Ꮅᘓᖇ⎱ Ⴙᥲ𝇋ƙᘓᖇ
Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by chuckbutler (Prior) on Aug 03, 2015 at 00:45 UTC

    It is amazing the documents one gathers over time. I used APL in my early career, so I still have many books, papers, and documents from then. Algol and Pascal items are also included in my collection; Niklaus Wirth would be proud!

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by ikegami (Pope) on Aug 07, 2015 at 22:06 UTC

      ++ again and again (were I able). Your links are perfectly in accord with the poll itself.

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by fullermd (Priest) on Aug 03, 2015 at 19:39 UTC

    Appears to be a tie, between Programmer's Guide to the IBM System/360 (1969), and (Computer Readings Series) An Introduction To Computer Systems, apparently edited 1969, mostly a collection of reprited articles from the latter half of the 60's.

    (neither of which I ever had cause to use in anger, of course ;)

    ETA: An honorable mention: A FORTRAN Coloring Book, 1978 8-}

          Appears to be a tie, between Programmer's Guide to the IBM System/360 (1969)

      I'd forgotten all about that one. I probably don't have it any more though. In all likelihood it was a victim of one of my purges.


      Peter L. Berghold -- Unix Professional
      Peter -at- Berghold -dot- Net; Blog: http://blog.berghold.net Warning: No political correctness allowed.
Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by Hermano23 (Beadle) on Aug 03, 2015 at 14:39 UTC
    Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

    1985

    Not as old as most people's answer, great book though.
Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by Ratazong (Monsignor) on Aug 03, 2015 at 17:29 UTC

    I have two old books I still resist to throw away:

    • Programmieren mit PASCAL by Ruedeger Baumann (1980) which contains many small exercises for learning how to program
    • Artificial Intelligence and Computer Games by Richard Bartle (1985) - simply a classic from the author of MUD!

    On the other hand, my old K&R has been sent for recycling long ago (I never really liked it anyways)

    So long, Rata

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by BrowserUk (Pope) on Aug 03, 2015 at 22:09 UTC

    The Basic-Plus Language Manual for PDP-11 Resource Time Sharing System dated 1971/1972; though my first encounter with it was around 1977/78. (And it's in a box in the loft somewhere.)

    On my desk is K&R 1978.

    In the cupboard behind me are The C++ programming Language by Bjarne Stroustrup; 1986 & Programming in C++ by Stephen C. Dewhurst & Kathy T. Stark; 1989.

    I've a relatively recently acquired digital copy of Algorithms + Data Structures = Programs, 1976 to replace the two copies I've lent out and not had returned over the years.


    Anyone got any experience of this phone's predecessor?

    With the rise and rise of 'Social' network sites: 'Computers are making people easier to use everyday'
    Examine what is said, not who speaks -- Silence betokens consent -- Love the truth but pardon error.
    "Science is about questioning the status quo. Questioning authority". I knew I was on the right track :)
    In the absence of evidence, opinion is indistinguishable from prejudice.
    I'm with torvalds on this Agile (and TDD) debunked I told'em LLVM was the way to go. But did they listen!
Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by mr_mischief (Monsignor) on Aug 04, 2015 at 17:20 UTC

    I may have something older at home. At work right now my oldest, and among my oldest overall hardcopy books about computers anyway, is Introduction to IBM System/360 Assembler Language Programming by Barry J. Passen from 1973.

    Edit:
    It turns out I do have at least one older volume at home. That is Compiler Construction for Digital Computers by David Gries. It's from 1971 and published by John Wiley.

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by drpaz (Acolyte) on Aug 06, 2015 at 20:28 UTC
    Lyons commentary on the unix kernel (with source).. Still a good goto (pardon the pun)

      (pardon the pun)

      if you make it a bit more functional. :)

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by swampyankee (Parson) on Aug 14, 2015 at 03:15 UTC

    I think I still have my IITRAN manual from college (see http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=363235.363257). I definitely have Kernighan and Plauger's Software Tool and Elements of Programming Style.


    Information about American English usage here and here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting. — emc

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by Laurent_R (Canon) on Aug 21, 2015 at 19:11 UTC
    The Art of Computer Programming, Vol 3, "Sorting and Searching", by Donald Knuth, 1973. My copies of the other volumes of the book are more recent (the 1990's). I bought Vol. 3 second hand, I believe.

    Otherwise, K&R's The C Programming Language, but the only second edition (1988).

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by perloHolic() (Beadle) on Aug 06, 2015 at 13:13 UTC
    COBOL for Students - Andrew Parkin - 1982..... wow
Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by ambrus (Abbot) on Aug 24, 2015 at 20:14 UTC

    If Donald Knuth, The Art of Computer Programming counts as a computer book, then that's the oldest one I have, for the translation of volumes 1–3 is based on the second edition from 1981.

    Otherwise, it's one of the thick volume IBM Personal Computer XT Technical Reference (1983), or the digital copy of the blue book Adele Goldberg, David Robson: Smalltalk-80: the language and its implementation (1983) which you can download (scanned) from http://stephane.ducasse.free.fr/FreeBooks/BlueBook/Bluebook.pdf.

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by Anonymous Monk on Aug 07, 2015 at 15:33 UTC

    I recently moved and left behind almost every paper book I own. This means the oldest computer book on my current laptop is Reverse Engineering for Beginners by Dennis Yurichev, and it's first copyright date is 2013. There goes my grognard credibility.

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by Anonymous Monk on Aug 10, 2015 at 10:58 UTC

    Mine is 'The C Programming Language', given to me by a friend that started C programming a long time ago but has moved on to Python.

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by carpecrustum (Initiate) on Aug 10, 2015 at 15:34 UTC
    Fundamentals of Data Structures
    Ellis Horowitz and Sartaj Sahni
    1976
Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by Silvermouse (Novice) on Aug 11, 2015 at 18:36 UTC
    SPITBOL version 2.0 Reference manual. Feb 12, 1971. Wrote a distant ancestor of Dragon's software in that.

    Recursive Programming in LISP, 1977
      My oldest are,

      Programming with Curses - John Strang - 1986

      Sed & Awk - Dale Dougherty - 1991

      Learning the Vi Editor - Linda Lamb & Arnold Robbins - 1998

        Programming with Curses - John Strang - 1986

        Oh #@$*! I forgot about that one.

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by hippo (Abbot) on Aug 21, 2015 at 09:46 UTC

    The oldest such book on the shelf behind me as I type is the Conference Digest from the 1970 Computational Physics Conference in London. Plenty of good stuff in there (along with some typesetting techniques never to be seen these days - typewritten equations with hand-drawn symbols (such as the integral sign) added later!).

    I no longer have it, but for many years I retained an 11x14 printout of the man page from perl4 (IIRC 4.036). This was the text from which I originally learned Perl and which I went back to time and again as a reference. Nowadays the prevalence of perldoc and the splitting of the one man page into many means that this approach is obsolete, of course.

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by pme (Parson) on Aug 22, 2015 at 11:42 UTC
Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by girarde (Hermit) on Aug 22, 2015 at 15:03 UTC
    "Thinking FORTH", Leo Brodie, 1984. I now wonder what happened to my copying of Starting FORTH: there was a flood last year.
Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by naunga (Initiate) on Aug 11, 2015 at 13:25 UTC
    Having purged a number of books, the oldest book on my shelves is a first edition of the camel book...that I still use.
Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by chacham (Prior) on Aug 19, 2015 at 13:54 UTC

    What is the oldest possible book anyway?

      What is the oldest possible book anyway?

      It probably should be this work from 1842:

      Sketch of
      The Analytical Engine
      Invented by Charles Babbage
      By L. F. MENABREA
      [...]
      With notes upon the Memoir by the Translator
      ADA AUGUSTA, COUNTESS OF LOVELACE

      which reputedly contains the first-ever computer programme — except that it’s too short to be a book. :-(

      So it’s quite possibly this book from 1864:

      Passages from the Life of a Philosopher by Charles Babbage

      in which Chapter VIII is devoted to the Analytical Engine.

      :-)

      Athanasius <°(((><contra mundum Iustus alius egestas vitae, eros Piratica,

        computer programme

        So, i started looking up when the English adopted "programme" as the new spelling of "program." I've just seen "19th century," and i'd like to match the year. Though, it seems less likely to make a difference, as even the English use "program" to refer to computer programming.

        But then i looked again. You come from Australia, where "programme" is indeed used for computer programs, though there are confusing reports, with one article claiming it is political.

        On further thought, though, Australia had not yet achieved nationhood in the 19th century. So, i figure the best term is indeed "computer program," at least when referring to this example. :)

        except that it’s too short to be a book.

        Booklet, maybe? I would count it.

Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by james28909 (Chaplain) on Aug 08, 2015 at 07:48 UTC
    I haven't bought any programming books yet. :0
Re: The oldest computer book still on my shelves (or on my digital media) is ...
by Anonymous Monk on Aug 21, 2015 at 07:27 UTC
    the Rosetta Stone 196 BC, although I'm not sure how to read it since the Perl translation was lost over time.

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