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Re: Re^2: Programming and math

by liz (Monsignor)
on Aug 09, 2003 at 21:07 UTC ( #282484=note: print w/replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Re^2: Programming and math
in thread Programming and math

...Of course the individual in question has to want to be a programmer in the first place. If they just went on a CS degree because they heard that the job pays well they're less likely to be competent :-)

It is exactly that. I've been exposed to too many "fast moving" CS students in the past years, who are only in it for the suits and the leased cars. Together with what I think is a sub-optimal, if not sub-standard, CS education in most institutions, makes me say that having had a CS education, is a minus.

In that respect it's a good thing that the number of new CS students in the Netherlands this year, has significantly dropped. Hopefully, there'll be more students in it for love of the subject matter, than for the great salaries.

Liz

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Re^4: Programming and math
by adrianh (Chancellor) on Aug 10, 2003 at 07:28 UTC
    I've been exposed to too many "fast moving" CS students in the past years, who are only in it for the suits and the leased cars.

    Annoying aren't they!

    That said, I still think a good developer will gain a lot from some formal CS education (assuming they don't know it already :-)

      Why "formal CS education"? The students who study CS at a university read the same books we can read...

        I wasn't trying to say that somebody has to go through a university programme.

        However, more "academic" CS knowledge is useful and can make you a better developer. A degree is a good a way of acquiring it. You can also go read the communications of the ACM and read a lot of Knuth.

        My (minor) point of contention is that I don't see a CS degree as a negative. Yes there are poor developers with CS degrees - but there are also poor developers without CS degrees. A good coder will get a hell of a lot out of a good degree programme.

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[stevieb]: yeah, I snowshoe a fair amount in the mountains. I also use spikes similar to these very often as well
[perldigious]: Discipulus: alternate link
[stevieb]: LOL you can easily replace "Helsinki" with "Alberta"
[perldigious]: I used to live at the top of a very steep hill stevieb, I can relate to the video. Literally used to have to build up momentum and try to force my vehicle to make it up the hill to park in my driveway properly... didn't always make it.
[choroba]: Why don't they use tire chains?
[perldigious]: First snow, probably not prepared right away choroba.
[stevieb]: it's Quebec... they do weird stuff there :) In the mountains, it is *mandatory* for trucks to use tire chains. Many passenger vehicles do as well (but it's not mandatory for them)
[perldigious]: That stuff can hit fast... like what we just got where I'm at. Saw a few people who had slid OUT of the roundabout I have to drive through to get to work, not used to the ice yet, take awhile to get the hang of it again and make vehicle adjustments.
[stevieb]: man, when the roads are glare ice, I don't even bother going to work or out... unless I absolutely have to, or was already out in the first place

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