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Re: Re: Re: Re: "The First Rule of Distributed Objects is..."

by perrin (Chancellor)
on Oct 21, 2003 at 22:26 UTC ( #301094=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Re: Re: Re: "The First Rule of Distributed Objects is..."
in thread Multi tiered web applications in Perl

Sometimes, you don't know ahead of time what gets used more than naught. Usually products evolve. And using mod_proxy or the likes is a cludge. What happens when you move something more than once?

It's not a kludge. Reverse proxying is widely used, and so is hardware load-balancing. IBM will be glad to sell you a commercial reverse proxy server if you prefer, but it's all the same idea. It's also trivial to change how URLs are being handled. You can send all requests for /foo/ to a special set of servers with a single mod_rewrite line, and even if you change it a million times no one on the outside will ever know or have to update a bookmark.

Things like static stuff doesn't need to hit db resources ever.

Of course. That's why I said you should keep your static web content separate from your dynamic requests. But this doesn't have much to do with logical tiers vs. physical tiers.

Ok, for instance, let's say your login page is realy fast, and so is your page after auth. Now let's say your preferences page is REALLY slow. It takes up lots of resources since it gets pegged a lot. Seperating out the logic that is so slow because it gets hit so much can be moved to it's own pool. Now you have one set { login, homepage} and another {preferences} which can be in two different pools.

Okay, what did we gain from that? If these were sharing resources on two machines before and were slow, we will now have one under-used machine and one overloaded machine. The balance is worse than it was.

A pooled connection vs an in-machine IPC call's speed is a magnatitude faster, but in terms of user experience, it is so small, that you can hardly notice.

If every request takes a tenth of a second longer than it did, no single user will have a slow experience but the scalability (in terms of requests that can be handled per second) will suffer in a big way.

No it doesn't. They are called transfer objects. Just a basket where you say, I want NN and it returns back in one request.

Forcing every communication between objects to be something that can be handled in one call just isn't a good design. Ideal OO design involves many small objects, not a few monolithic ones.

Ah.. that's the thing. evenly. You don't want everything running evenly. If slashdot could seperate out say, it's front page logic from its comment logic, then the front page will always be speedy and the comments section be its relative speed. As more people do commenty stuff, the home page stays right quick.

You keep talking about putting separate pages on different machines, but this conversation was originally about tiers, i.e. page generation, business logic, database access objects. Most dynamic pages will need all of these for any given request.

It sounds like you are saying that you want to be able to sacrifice parts of a site and let them have rotten performance as long as you can keep other parts fast. I don't think that's a common goal, and I wouldn't call that scalability (how can you say the site is scaling if part of it is not scaling?), but it can easilly be done with mod_rewrite or a load-balancer directing the comments requests to some specific servers. (Incidentally, Slashdot caches their front-page and serves it as a static page unless you are logged in.)

b bogs down t to the point of "slow". You add another server. Things get "better" but imagine if you tier'ed it. You have three machines. One that handles s, one that handles b and one that handles t. the t-machine will alwyas run fast. And as more people use b, you add more resources for b. But as b continuously gets more and more poeple, T NEVER slows down. THAT is what you want to avoid.

The only way this could actually be an advantage is if you are willing to let b get overloaded and slow, as long as t does not. That is not a common situation at the sites where I've worked.

You don't want to add to the entire pool and have to speed up everything in one fell-swoop. It's the same reason you have a 3d video card and a cpu completely seperate.

The difference is that those are not interchangeable resources, i.e. splitting your rendering across the two of them doesn't work well since one of them is much better at it than the other is. In the case of identical servers with general resources like CPU and RAM, each one is equally capable of handling any request.

But you can't refute that if T stays simple and fast, and B gets more complex, that T would be unaffected. :)

I agree, but I think that if you added the necessary resources to keep B running fast (as opposed to just letting it suck more and more), then T would be unaffected in either scenario.

Better be nice to the GF! That's one area where load-balancing is extremely problematic...


Comment on Re: Re: Re: Re: "The First Rule of Distributed Objects is..."
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: "The First Rule of Distributed Objects is..."
by exussum0 (Vicar) on Oct 21, 2003 at 22:39 UTC
    I'm not saying load balancers are a kludge. You are putting words were there weren't. Things like mod_proxy are, since they are slow. I've seen them implemented and they just require an extra load.

    You don't create monolithic objects. You create containers. That's like complaining ArrayList is monolithic because you put a bunch of Integer objects in it. You create a DTO object whch contains everything you will need and one method that'd contains the returned objects in some organized fasion.

    I'm also saying, dont let certain parts go rotten. I'm saying some parts will require resources beyond that of others. You seperate them out. But you see, that's the problem with life. Sometimes B will be over loaded and slow w/o extra resources, and there isn't much you can do about it. It's life. But when those things get hit, they could slow down the entire service as a whole. You know the varios costs of things beofre hand and by seperating them out, you are prepared to allocate new resources to them when needed.

    Play that funky music white boy..
      Thanks for making me think about this some more. Let's summarize things a bit.

      I think that adding one ore more RPC calls to each request will add significant overhead. You think it will get lost in the noise. We probably won't agree on that, and I only have anecdotal evidence to prove my point, so agree to disagree.

      I think that forcing the communication between the presentation logic, domain objects, and database layer to be done with coarse-grained calls is a problem. You don't think it matters. Fowler talks about this in his recent book, and that chapter is mostly republished in this article (which requires a free registration). Here's a relevant excerpt:

      A local interface is best as a fine-grained interface. Thus, if I have an address class, a good interface will have separate methods for getting the city, getting the state, setting the city, setting the state and so forth. A fine-grained interface is good because it follows the general OO principle of lots of little pieces that can be combined and overridden in various ways to extend the design into the future.

      A fine-grained interface doesnít work well when itís remote. When method calls are slow, you want to obtain or update the city, state and zip in one call rather than three. The resulting interface is coarse-grained, designed not for flexibility and extendibility but for minimizing calls. Here youíll see an interface along the lines of get-address details and update-address details. Itís much more awkward to program to, but for performance, you need to have it.

      I would point out that with a fine-grained interface you could throw an error when someone passes in a bad zip code, while a coarse-grained one would necessitate gathering up all the errors from all the input, putting them in some kind of structure to pass back, and then making the client code go through the structure and respond to each issue. It just isn't as fluid. But we will probably not agree on this either. I do recognize that there are situations where everything can be summed up in a single call, but I don't think all communications between layers fit well into that.

      Finally, you seem to see the primary value of a distributed architecture as the ability to isolate individual sections of the app. You are talking about fairly large sections, like entire pages, so I think this is separate from the original question of whether or not the presentation layer and application layer should be on the same machine. I agree that there are uses for this, but I still think they only apply when you are willing to let a certain section of your application perform badly as long as another section performs well. I don't see how your statement that "some parts will require resources beyond that of others" applies to this. Of course they will, and at that point you can either improve your overall capacity to handle it, or isolate the part that is performing badly and let it continue to perform badly while the rest of the application is fast.

      I'll give an example of a use for this. Say you have an e-commerce site that has a feature to track a customer's packages. This involves a query to an external company's web site. It's slow, and there is nothing you can do about it since that resource is out of your control. Letting all of your servers handle requests for this could result in tying up many server processes while they wait for results and could lead to a general slowdown. You could either add resources to the whole site in order to offer the best performance possible for all requests, or you could isolate these package tracking requests on a few machines, making them incredibly slow but allowing the rest of the site (which is making you money) to stay fast. This could be a good compromise, depending on the economics of the situation.

      Note that if you then go and add more machines to the slow package tracking cluster to fully handle the load, I would consider the isolation pointless. You could have simply left things all together and added those machines to the general cluster, with the exact same result.

      I said this was easy to implement with mod_proxy, and it is, but you correctly pointed out that mod_proxy has significant overhead. There are some other benefits to the mod_proxy approach (caching, serving static files) but for just isolating a particular set of URLs to specific groups of machines you would probably be better off doing it with a hardware load-balancer.

        Finally, you seem to see the primary value of a distributed architecture as the ability to isolate individual sections of the app. You are talking about fairly large sections, like entire pages, so I think this is separate from the original question of whether or not the presentation layer and application layer should be on the same machine. I agree that there are uses for this, but I still think they only apply when you are willing to let a certain section of your application perform badly as long as another section performs well. I don't see how your statement that "some parts will require resources beyond that of others" applies to this. Of course they will, and at that point you can either improve your overall capacity to handle it, or isolate the part that is performing badly and let it continue to perform badly while the rest of the application is fast. I'll give an example of a use for this. ...
        Well think of it like this. In CS, you can use a divide and conquor type of architecture right? That's how merge/quick sort work. It's also how many other things work, like matrix multiplication. If you can optimize the heavy parts, everything gets quicker. Same reason you use profilers. Point is, by keeping the heavy parts completely isolated from the quicker parts and paying attn to those heavy parts, things will always run fast. If those heavy parts get bogged down again, the quick parts stay quick. That is the big part of keeping everything seperated out, loosly coupled, in one complete architecture. By having things so tight knit, one part CAN slow down the other, and you have to pay attn to the whole.
        Note that if you then go and add more machines to the slow package tracking cluster to fully handle the load, I would consider the isolation pointless. You could have simply left things all together and added those machines to the general cluster, with the exact same result.
        Ah, but measuring need becomes difficult. Adding one machine may making things 5% faster over all.. but if you need that one thing that is slow to become faster, you can improve its speed greatly. But sometiems slower performance doesn't matter so much. Think of say, like reports. No.. not reports. I'm not talking about sophisticated reports. Say.. all messages you've posted to perlmonks. It's ok if it's a little slow since it's a once in a blue moon opperation. It may take a bit of time and resources, but you know what.. that may be ok. And if you want, you can easily redirect stuff by saying what operation goes to who internally, w/o putting up new sysadminny type stuff.
        There are some other benefits to the mod_proxy approach (caching, serving static files) but for just isolating a particular set of URLs to specific groups of machines you would probably be better off doing it with a hardware load-balancer.
        Totally agree on you, but putting some stuff on static pages isn't always an option. And load balancers do solve part of the problem, but not the total problem.

        But you know, it is true. Adding ONE web server to a system that is at 101% capacity solves the problem. The whole splitting things up is great for large systems. Large systems that have large apis.. prolly something you wouldn't do in mod_perl but in more business directed languages, like java or even cobol :)

        Play that funky music white boy..

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