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Re: Re: Re: A Perl-app for twingling

by flyingmoose (Priest)
on May 19, 2004 at 16:58 UTC ( #354679=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Re: Re: A Perl-app for twingling
in thread A Perl-app for twingling

I am surprised though at the seeming lack of activity of interest in this area
I'm highly interested from a professional standpoint, it's a fascinating problem with lots of cool graph-theory type implications and room for all sorts of whiz-bang algorithmic voodoo. It's great. But as far as email goes, I'm *already* super organized, so I don't need the app at all. This is part of the problem, I guess, because someone who gets to the level where they can appreciate something like this probably doesn't need it, or could otherwise write similar software. But again, the theory is highly fascinating, and I'd love it if more things worked as an intelligent (emphasis on intelligent) database rather than a hierarchial file cabinet.


Comment on Re: Re: Re: A Perl-app for twingling
Re: Re: Re: Re: A Perl-app for twingling
by punkish (Priest) on May 19, 2004 at 19:10 UTC
    I'm highly interested from a professional standpoint, it's a fascinating problem with lots of cool graph-theory type implications and room for all sorts of whiz-bang algorithmic voodoo.
    Yes, it is. ;-) However...
    But as far as email goes, I'm *already* super organized, so I don't need the app at all. This is part of the problem, I guess, because someone who gets to the level where they can appreciate something like this probably doesn't need it, or could otherwise write similar software.
    I would offer a different take. Email is a particularly fascinating subject matter. It is a diary of our lives, professional, cultural, lord-only-knows even romantic. It is the conversation between ourselves and our colleagues. It is our banter, our very thought process.

    Organizing it is a, not necessarily futile, but a perhaps detrimental process because it might prevent us from discovering hidden "patterns" and "linkages." Once again, I refer back to my "Netflix v. Blockbuster" analogy. Rarely do I know what I am looking for, but mostly I walk out with a smile because I discovered something next to something else. Of course, the downfall of a Blockbuster or a library is that the organization goes back to just one level -- alphabetical within subject.

    Perhaps a better parallel would be like Alexa for my email... or, what was it called -- something called Firefly or whatever that used to exist (dunno if it still does), or the smartlists in iTunes. Finding patterns based on what I choose, pick, or click on.

      It is our banter, our very thought process.
      For you perhaps. For me, it speaks no more than a conversation in the hall, or on the phone, or in the checkout line in a grocery store. Or a photograph, or something I saw with my eyes. The thing that keeps all of these in place, regardless of medium, is the human brain -- and it's truly fascinating. I have near instantaneous recall and a minimum overhead for this recall, and unimportant things are deleted automatically! :)

      Is organizing detrimental? Well, no. Organizing can be applied to any medium, not just in the computer realm. Yep, in your brain too. It's skill. If we rely on computers to substitute for our minds, we are doomed. Admittedly, this might have better applications than email, such as, per se, the miserable failure that was the "Semantic Web".

      I have a desire to play with computers in my spare time, but that desire is getting crushed because I stare at too many monitors at work. Best of luck to you! It *is* an interesting subject. But I will keep my brain. I like it. It also doesn't hurt my eyes when I try to use it.

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