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Constants you cannot help but remember

by dragonchild (Archbishop)
on Jun 08, 2004 at 15:21 UTC ( #362381=perlmeditation: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??

I was in bed last night thinking about random stuff and was trying to compare the time setup (hours/minutes/etc) in a sci-fi book I just finished to our world. Its setup was 10 hours, 100 minutes, 100 seconds - 100,000 seconds/day. I was wondering how that mapped to the standard time setup. And, then it happened. Into my head popped 86,400. Seconds/day, that is.

How many other random constants do you remember because of being a programmer? Mine include:

  • 86,400 seconds/day
  • 3.1415926 (PI)
  • 72 points/inch
  • 4:3 (aspect ratio of a monitor)

------
We are the carpenters and bricklayers of the Information Age.

Then there are Damian modules.... *sigh* ... that's not about being less-lazy -- that's about being on some really good drugs -- you know, there is no spoon. - flyingmoose

I shouldn't have to say this, but any code, unless otherwise stated, is untested

Comment on Constants you cannot help but remember
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by pelagic (Curate) on Jun 08, 2004 at 15:28 UTC
    >   How many other random constants do you remember because of being a programmer?
    • 255 2 ^ 8 - 1
    • 80 Number of Chars on a punchcard

    pelagic
      I had memorized the first sixteen powers of two before I had even seen an Apple ][+. In junior high. I guess that's one indication that I had found my calling.

      --
      [ e d @ h a l l e y . c c ]

Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by Anonymous Monk on Jun 08, 2004 at 15:28 UTC
    ancient Chinese proverb: "The weakest ink is stronger than the strongest memory."

      I've translated this idea into my own life with the catch-phrase: "Google is your friend." With the Google Calculator who needs to remember any constants? :)

Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by Hanamaki (Chaplain) on Jun 08, 2004 at 15:36 UTC
    Probably most of the ASCII Codepoints, and too many characters out auf JIS-X208 in euc-jp encoding. The day I won't need a Japanese font, but read ASCII-rubish like the real thing, I will consult a therapist. I hope!
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by mpeppler (Vicar) on Jun 08, 2004 at 15:37 UTC
    4:3 aspect ratio of a monitor...
    Except mine is a 16:9 aspect ratio :-)
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by BrowserUk (Pope) on Jun 08, 2004 at 15:43 UTC

    The powers of 2 to 64k. 186.000 m/s and (for some peculiar reason) 6.023E23?


    Examine what is said, not who speaks.
    "Efficiency is intelligent laziness." -David Dunham
    "Think for yourself!" - Abigail
      6.023E23 - That's the number of atoms in a mole. Chemistry strikes again! :-)

      ------
      We are the carpenters and bricklayers of the Information Age.

      Then there are Damian modules.... *sigh* ... that's not about being less-lazy -- that's about being on some really good drugs -- you know, there is no spoon. - flyingmoose

      I shouldn't have to say this, but any code, unless otherwise stated, is untested

        Avagadro's (sp?) constant (I think?) I remembered--but why eludes me. I was never a chemist. The last time I did anything involving chemistry was 1973!


        Examine what is said, not who speaks.
        "Efficiency is intelligent laziness." -David Dunham
        "Think for yourself!" - Abigail

        "That's the number of atoms in a mole"

        You can tell my Chemistry memory's gone - my first thought was, "Yes, but, baby moles have less atoms in them than adult ones, surely?".

        cLive ;-)

      avogadros' number dude, too much time spent in physical chemistry...
      ...wufnik

      -- in the world of the mules there are no rules --
      But it is 186,282 miles/s, no?
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by Old_Gray_Bear (Bishop) on Jun 08, 2004 at 15:43 UTC
    Here's what popped out while I was waiting for the tea to brew:
    • 1440 -- number of minutes in 24 hours
    • 65536 -- 2^16
    • 256 -- 2^8
    • 1024 -- 2^10
    • 1.41459(?) It's been a while since I needed to do geometrical transformations.
    • 360 degrees = 2pi rad
    • Not exactly a numberic constant, but the size of the standard 80 column Holerith Card is the same size of a dollar bill at the turn of the 19th century.
    If I dredged a bit, I might be able to come up with some of the interest rate conversion factors I was using when I worked for a bank back in the 80's. But I'd rather not. It's amazing the amount of 'trivia' you remember that is actually important in context. Thank you for something to keep me amused during my Staff 'Meeting' (which starts in 10 minutes.

    ----
    I Go Back to Sleep, Now.

    OGB

      1.41459(?) It's been a while since I needed to do geometrical transformations.

      Are you thinking of 1/Sin(45) = Sqrt(2) = 1.41421?
      1.41459(?) It's been a while since I needed to do geometrical transformations.

      It seems you have combined

      • sqrt(2) = 1.41421
      • Pi = 3.14159
      two numbers together, to form a new one!
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by idsfa (Vicar) on Jun 08, 2004 at 15:47 UTC

    Just a few ...

    • Speed of light is ππππ picoparsecs per ππ Pluto periods
    • or one foot per nanosecond
    • π x 107 seconds in a year
    • 2n for n = 0, 1, ... , 16
    • Prime numbers < 100
    • ASCII < 127
    • And some of the stuff in Perl Special Variables Quick Reference

    If anyone needs me I'll be in the Angry Dome.
      I remember the phrase, "pi seconds is a nanocentury". Heh.
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by Preceptor (Chaplain) on Jun 08, 2004 at 15:52 UTC
    84,600 - seconds in a day
    1440 minutes in a day.
    80 x 24 standard terminal window size.
    1024 2^10 = 1Kb
    1048576 2^20 = 1Mb
    299,792,458 m/s = C

      1440 minutes in a day.

      you cant' fool me. 14400 is a baud rate modem speed, kind of.

      Cheerio, Sören

        No. 1440 is a size of a floppy disk, in kilobytes (when formatted normally).
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by davido (Archbishop) on Jun 08, 2004 at 15:54 UTC
    If you have a little explorer/navigator in your blood:

    One minute of latitudinal arc = one nautical mile. 1 degree = 60 minutes. 360 degrees * 60 minutes = 21600nm; the approximate circumference of the Earth, in nautical miles. Since there are 6076 feet in a nautical mile, and 60 seconds in a minute, there are approximately 100 feet (101.26 to be exact) per second of arc.

    What doesn't make a lot of sense is why folks decided to use a different statute mile. ;) The nautical mile is so convenient.


    Dave

      In metric the size of the earth is easier since the French originally defined the metre to be 1/10000000th of the distance from the North Pole to the Equator through Paris. (the definition has changed but the value is still close enough)

      That's a really easy constant to remember. I have needed it often even if those living in the US would rather use feet (or Survey Feet, or Clarke's feet, or whatever) (for which I can always remember the conversion factor 0.3048 by the way)

Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by demerphq (Chancellor) on Jun 08, 2004 at 15:58 UTC

    All the powers of 2 up to a reasonable number. Most of the time constants (seconds/minutes per hour/day). A big chunk of the ASCII table. And that bugs are inevitable.


    ---
    demerphq

      First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.
      -- Gandhi


Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by adrianh (Chancellor) on Jun 08, 2004 at 16:11 UTC
    How many other random constants do you remember because of being a programmer?

    Lots of powers of two.

    The fact that 65537 is prime (it was used in the PRNG for one of my first computers)

Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by halley (Prior) on Jun 08, 2004 at 17:28 UTC
    e ^ (i * pi) + 1 = 0

    There really are only three numbers of interest in computer programming, though: ZERO, ONE and N. If you need to support two of something, you really should refactor to support any arbitrary number instead.

    Oh, and the 72 points per inch thing is an abomination spawned by Adobe, Inc. to simplify their PostScript programming language. The traditional value is 72.27 points per inch. It's kinda sad that the Google calculator prefers Adobe's version of the number, but at least it refers to them as "PostScript points".

    --
    [ e d @ h a l l e y . c c ]

      I maintain that there are only three numbers: 0, 1, and infinity; and I'm not entirely convinced about the 1.

      This applies to mathematics in general, not just programming, but it is especially pertinent to programming.

•Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by merlyn (Sage) on Jun 08, 2004 at 17:33 UTC
      42 - 1 while not a constant is the number of Mersenne Primes known at the moment...

      --hsm

      "Never try to teach a pig to sing...it wastes your time and it annoys the pig."
      42
      What is 6 * 9 (base 13)?

      -QM
      --
      Quantum Mechanics: The dreams stuff is made of

Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by Steve_p (Priest) on Jun 08, 2004 at 18:17 UTC
    SYS 64738

    From my Commodore 64 days ...

      Man... I think I still have some old C64 values stuck in my head somewhere...

      • 1024: The location of the top-left character of screen memory.
      • 2048: Beginning of the BASIC program storage.
      • 32768: Beginning of the cartridge port memory space.
      • 53280: Location to poke to change the border color.
      • 53281: Location to poke to change the background color.

      UPDATE: I forgot one that haunts my dreams

      • EA: Opcode for the NOOP instruction in 6502/10 assembly.

      SYS 49152

      ... but I did forget the colour pokes.

      Even more interesting would be a list of constants that one just keeps forgetting, although mine would be quite long, including A4 / A5 paper formats etc.
      A lot of customer numbers, account numbers and passwords are in my head, and that's quite useful. Some phone numbers as well.
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by gri6507 (Deacon) on Jun 08, 2004 at 18:42 UTC
    Gravitational constant
    Epsilon naught
    Mu naught
    Electron rest mass
    Mass of a proton
    Atomic mass of Hydrogen, helium, Carbon, Oxygen
    Plank's constant
    Hubble's constant (which is not a constant at all)
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by pbeckingham (Parson) on Jun 08, 2004 at 19:23 UTC

    This is an illness.

    • 6.02217 x 1038
    • 3.14159265358979323846264338279502884197169399375105820944974
    • 3 x 108
    • KFC 322G - bus, first day of secondary school. In fact license plates galore.
    • 0.142857, 0.285714, 0.428571, 0.571428, 0.857142 (1/7, 2/7, ...), plus other 'important' fractions.
    • 2.71828
    • credit card numbers
    • NI number, SSN, Student #
    • 86,400 s/day
    • 168 h/wk
    • 1,048,576 Bytes
    • 10100 googol
    • 10googol googolplex
    • 1.619 x 10-19 what is that?

      1.619 x 10-19 what is that

      electron charge

      davidj

        Actually, no - but thank you. It was an old school competition to remember the most. That's the residual memory of it.

Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by hardburn (Abbot) on Jun 08, 2004 at 19:31 UTC

    My post-high school education is mostly in networking, so I remember things like these:

    • Various TCP/UDP ports (22/ssh, 80/HTTP, etc.)
    • Some RFCs (822 for message formats, etc.)
    • 1500 bytes (MTU of Ethernet)

    Most of the programming-related constants I know have already been covered, but here are few more:

    • 6 bits to a byte in Knuth's MIX machine
    • 54 is the limit of multi-dimentional arrays in VB (not that I want to know this . . . )

    ----
    send money to your kernel via the boot loader.. This and more wisdom available from Markov Hardburn.

Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by baruch (Beadle) on Jun 09, 2004 at 03:34 UTC

    (1+sqrt(5))/2 = 1.61893398875... and its inverse, 0.61893398875... The limit of the ratios of two consecutive Fibonacci numbers as they approach infinity.


    בּרוּך
      Yes, Phi!

      But thats not the limit of its interest...
      Its also the only number to solve the equation:
      X+1=X^2 (corrected my formular re:browserUk)

        Raises eyebrows. Um... you mean like 2 + 2 = 2^2?


        Examine what is said, not who speaks.
        "Efficiency is intelligent laziness." -David Dunham
        "Think for yourself!" - Abigail
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by toma (Vicar) on Jun 09, 2004 at 05:05 UTC
    Here's some from my EE role:
    • The 1% resistor values closest to the 5% resistor series
    • The 5% capacitor series
    • 2.54
    • 3.14159
    • 2.71828
    • 159kHz ~ 1M Radian/sec, where 1mH = j1k and 1uF = -j1
    • Way too many component specifications, such as 2N2222A Betamin = 100
    • An arcane corporate part-numbering scheme that dates back to microfilm and punch cards.

    It should work perfectly the first time! - toma
      And those with an affinifity for BJT IC design

      25ohms (re @ 1mA Ic)
      -2mV/C (Vbe tempco)
      1.21V (band-gap voltage)
      25mV (thermal voltage)
      0.35 (converting BW to rise time and back)
      99.7% (3 sigma)

Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by jepri (Parson) on Jun 09, 2004 at 05:47 UTC
    When I saw the title, I thought you were looking for universal constants like "It's always in the last place you look", or "You never have the right change for the meter", or "Never wear ugh boots outside the house"

    But you want physical constants. That's not interesting. I mean, they were lying around just waiting for someone to notice. The ugh boots constant required painful research (by someone else, thankfully).

    Hmmm. I was going to quote something educated, like Feigenbaum's number or the universal gas constant, but the only one I can really remember is that the phone number of the local pizza place is 131888. Somehow that number was always involved in a late night physics assignment.

    ___________________
    Jeremy
    I didn't believe in evil until I dated it.

      Ahhhh, i thought you might be Australian (or NZ) by the ugh boot reference. the refernce to Domino's really cemented it.. :-)

      I'll have a BBQ Meatlovers with anchovies and Jalapeños please.

      "You never have the right change for the meter"
      The somewhat disturbing thing is the failure to context switch that I had reading this. It took me more than a minute to stop wondering what the exchange rate for yards to metres was at the retail level. And what the commission rate was.
      "Excuse me, have you got change for a metre?"
      "Sorry, I've only got a couple of decimetres..."
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by greenFox (Vicar) on Jun 09, 2004 at 06:07 UTC

    666 }:>

    I was going to suggest this would make a good poll (favourite constant) but it's already been done.

    --
    Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of the wise. Seek what they sought. -Basho

Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by ambrus (Abbot) on Jun 09, 2004 at 09:22 UTC

    Not many constants, in fact.

    0150 — the code of a dash in windows; 0x2014 — the unicode of a dash. Also a lot of character codes, especially the CWI ones. In the DOS days, you had to know them. (I've forgotten them now.)

    Powers of 2 up to 65536 (1 2 4 8 16 32 64 128 256 512 1024 2048 4096 8192 16384 32768 65536).

    Oh, and 0 == SEEK_SET.

    Update. It seems that no-one has mentioned 273 K ~= 0oC. Also noF == ((n-32)*10/18)oC. And 1 in == 25.4 mm.

    Update. Yes, I know my social security number too, although that's of no use.

Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by delirium (Chaplain) on Jun 09, 2004 at 11:58 UTC
    3.785 Liters per Gallon

    Of course, every American male who'se used a public urinal knows 1 Gallon Per Flush = 3.8 Liters Per Flush, which makes some tech support people snicker when a user calls in asking what a GPF is.

Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by davis (Vicar) on Jun 09, 2004 at 12:05 UTC
    • A4 Paper = 210x297 mm
    • 1 ream == 500 sheets
    • 1 Inch ≅ 25.4mm
    • 12 Inches ≅ 30.48cm
    • All my Credit Card Numbers
    • All my previous car registration numbers
    • 3.1415926535897932384626
    • 8192*180 == number of bytes in a standard DDHD 1.44MB floppy disk
    • All powers of 2 up to 216
    • My homenode id
    • Just about all the telephone extension numbers of people at work
    • 22 Nov 1963 (JFK's assassination, but I've got no idea why I remember it)
    • 2.2lb ≅ 1 Kg
    • 1 cwt ≅ 51 Kg
    • 1 oz ≅ 28g
    • 160 Km/H ≅ 100Mph
    • 273.15 K ≅ 0° C
    Update: HTML entities added
    Fixed A4 units as per Happy-the-monk's msg.

    davis
    It's not easy to juggle a pregnant wife and a troubled child, but somehow I managed to fit in eight hours of TV a day.
      22 Nov 1963 (JFK's assassination, but I've got no idea why I remember it)

      Maybe you had the same 8th grade teacher I did - we spent 6 weeks on the assassination. Most of us were convinced she was on the grassy knoll! :-)

      ------
      We are the carpenters and bricklayers of the Information Age.

      Then there are Damian modules.... *sigh* ... that's not about being less-lazy -- that's about being on some really good drugs -- you know, there is no spoon. - flyingmoose

      I shouldn't have to say this, but any code, unless otherwise stated, is untested

      All powers of 2 up to 216

      What? 216 is a power of 6, not 2.

        216 is a power of 6, not 2
        Yes it is. In my post the 16 is inside <sup> tags, which raises above the rest of the text, making it look like 2^16. Lynx also displays this as 2^16. What browser are you using?

        davis
        It's not easy to juggle a pregnant wife and a troubled child, but somehow I managed to fit in eight hours of TV a day.
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by exussum0 (Vicar) on Jun 09, 2004 at 12:50 UTC
    130. as in alt 130, said I in the node that must not be named. or orb did iirc.

    Bart: God, Schmod. I want my monkey-man.

Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by coldmiser (Hermit) on Jun 09, 2004 at 14:53 UTC
    1s and 0s baby!!!
    1s and 0s!!!

    Also 132 columns in 'green bar' paper (how's that for being old?)

      Also 132 columns in 'green bar' paper (how's that for being old?)

      Me trips down memory lane... that's old. ;^)

      0.007 inches -- nominal thickness of a punchcard.

Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by tbone1 (Monsignor) on Jun 09, 2004 at 16:07 UTC
    I'm afraid to start down this road. I majored in astrophysics, so I remember things from:

    • astronomy (3.26 light years in a parsec, 5400K surface temperature of the sun, 11 - years in sunspot cycle, only 15% of stars are in single-star systems, Chandrasekhar's limit of 1.44 solar masses for a white dwarf, etc),
    • physics (Planck's constant, speed of light, gravitational constant, etc),
    • chemistry (1.0038 ratio of rest masses for Neutron and Proton, Avagadro's number, etc),
    • mathematics (pi is 3.14159265..., e is 2.718281828...),
    and so on.

    Then there's the sports geek stuff, some of it pretty obscure:

    2 - most number of consecutive no-hitters by one pitcher (Johnny van der Meer)
    176 - most points scored by an ABA team in a regular season game (Indiana Pacers, at Pittburgh Condors)
    44 - Pete Rose's consecutive hit streak to set the National League record
    755 - Hank Aaron's home run record
    2 - number of people to win the Indy 500 and Daytona 500 (Mario Andretti (one each) and A.J. Foyt (4/2))

    Gah! I can't stop! Shoot me now!

    --
    tbone1, YAPS (Yet Another Perl Schlub)
    And remember, if he succeeds, so what.
    - Chick McGee

Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by cog (Parson) on Jun 09, 2004 at 16:30 UTC
    404 - Not found

    perl -e 's..g.g.s..o.o.s..c.c..print'
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by Juerd (Abbot) on Jun 09, 2004 at 19:26 UTC

    3.1415926 (PI)

    That'd be 3.1415927 :)

    Let's see... (Okay, not all are constant)

    • HTTP status codes: 404 500 403 401 200 302 304
    • RFCs: 822 2822 1459
    • pi: 3.1415926357 (rounded)
    • Time: 86400 60,24,7,28/29/30/31,12,365/366 7776000
    • Phone numbers, PO Boxes, zipcodes, area codes, country prefixes
    • Bank card number
    • SSN
    • ICQ UIN: 7516019
    • The PID of my main screen session on my gateway/irc box: 25901 (screen -x 25901 :P)
    • Columns: 40 80 132
    • Lines: 24 25 60 120
    • Ratios: 4:3 5:4 16:9 3:2 1:sqrt(2)
    • Screen modes: 640x480 800x600 1024x768 1280x1024 1600x1200
    • Powers of 2: 1 2 4 8 16 32 64 128 256 512 1024 2048 4096 8192 (...) 32768 65536
    • Powers of 10 ;)
    • DPIs: 72, 150, 300, 600, 1200, 2400, PhotoRET :)
    • 15 pixels (why?)
    • 8+2 digits on casio fx82 calculators
    • Classroom numbers (Trying to forget!)
    • Serial line speeds: 300 2400 14400 28800 56000 57600 64000 128000 155200
    Now my head hurts.

    Juerd # { site => 'juerd.nl', plp_site => 'plp.juerd.nl', do_not_use => 'spamtrap' }

Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by amw1 (Friar) on Jun 09, 2004 at 19:39 UTC
    RFC 2549
    RFC 1918
    for some reason out of the dozens of these things I've used these are the ones that I remember.
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by McMahon (Chaplain) on Jun 09, 2004 at 19:42 UTC
    6530 terminal
    3270 terminal

    Update:
    Tandem error numbers:
    43: disk full
    45: file full
    40: awaitio error
    10: file or record exists
    1: EOF

    Telco error numbers:
    709: street not found
    701: address not found
    etc.

    Argh.
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by CloneArmyCommander (Friar) on Jun 09, 2004 at 21:03 UTC
    The ASCII values and their binary equivilents for the letters of the alphabet :). One of the many thing that I learn in boredom :). I guess that could sortof fit in with numbers I've remembered from being a programmer :). I'm sure there are other people out there who had some free time on their hands and said, how about convert the decimal values of the ASCII table to binary :), hahahah :).
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by QM (Vicar) on Jun 10, 2004 at 14:10 UTC
    j = sqrt(-1) # EEs already use i for something else

    62 = sum of dimensions in inches for checking baggage on a certain airline without charge (left my DDR platform in another city)

    77 = the version of Fortran I first learned

    66 = the version I had to convert into 77 later

    -QM
    --
    Quantum Mechanics: The dreams stuff is made of

Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by Anonymous Monk on Jun 10, 2004 at 15:36 UTC

    I can remember all integers between 0 and 10 most of the time and they stay fairly constant. With the help of some extra digits (the ones on my feet) I can even reach 20.

    Which is as about as childish as one can get with this node.
    Which is why I vote to stop it...

Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by herveus (Parson) on Jun 10, 2004 at 16:46 UTC
    Howdy!

    How many other random constants do you remember because of being a programmer?

    That limitation seems to have been ignored by many respondants. Oh well...

    Hmmm...let's see:

    • 512x512 - the size of a PLATO screen in pixels
    • 60 bits per word, 10 characters per word - memory characteristics of a CDC Cyber
    • 128 - the number of characters in a charset
    • 10 - the number of armies you have to bomb to get a kill in empire
    • 8x16 - the character cell on PLATO
    yours,
    Michael
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by gawatkins (Monsignor) on Jun 10, 2004 at 17:28 UTC

    Not really a constant, but no body has mentioned the exhaustive list of vi commands. I used vi as my editor during college for all of my programming classes, and after seven years I still sometimes hit Esc <shift>: wq when I try to save a document and exit microsoft word, for example.

    Greg W
      1 - The loneliest number.
      2 - Company.
      3 - A crowd.

      451 - Farenheit.
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by naChoZ (Curate) on Jun 11, 2004 at 15:58 UTC

    License plate numbers

    mine, my wifes, my mother's, my uncle's, my first girl friend's, etc...

    net related...

    number of class c's (or ip's in fractions thereof) in /8 through /32
    associated netmasks for same
    The private blocks (10.0.0.0/8, etc...)
    The boundaries between class A B C and D, 128, 192, 224...
    Number of seconds for a multitude of times from doing so many dns records.
    dozens and dozens of tcp/ip ports...

    various photography related numbers

    tungsten color temperature, 3200° kelvin
    full sun, high noon color temperature, 5500° kelvin
    my filter mount sizes, lens mount sizes

    misc

    Soc Sec # (mine and my wife's)
    various phone numbers, mine, my cell, my wife's cell and work, my sis-in-law's home and cell, bro-in-law's cell, mom home and work, pharmacy, time-temp, etc...

    and of course, the time of day when lunch starts...

    --
    Diplomacy is the art of saying "Nice doggie" until you can find a rock.
    naChoZ

Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by zakzebrowski (Curate) on Jun 11, 2004 at 20:48 UTC
    • 300,600,1200,2400,3600,9600,14.4,36,52
    • char(32) char(64)
    • F0 0F C7 C8
    • and, as merlyn said, 42.


    ----
    Zak - the office
Re: Constants you cannot help but remember
by dada (Chaplain) on Jun 11, 2004 at 21:46 UTC
    being dada, I really can't help but remember 391 :-)

    cheers,
    Aldo

    King of Laziness, Wizard of Impatience, Lord of Hubris

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