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RE: RE: RE: My crime of choice

by BigJoe (Curate)
on Oct 12, 2000 at 22:21 UTC ( #36465=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to RE: RE: My crime of choice
in thread My crime of choice

Maybe we shoulda submitted that to Larry Wall for Perl 6.0. It would be a good feature have it on by default maybe with some other newbie flags set then have

use expert_mode;
for people to shut off the newbie flags

--BigJoe

Learn patience, you must.
Young PerlMonk, craves Not these things.
Use the source Luke.


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RE: RE: RE: RE: My crime of choice
by extremely (Priest) on Oct 13, 2000 at 05:19 UTC

    As long as it defaults to off for perl -e ...

    And short scripts I have all over my HD from the past 5 years that were written using autovivification of globals because they are only 10 or 15 lines long.

    Oh wait, that may too much DWIM for one program.

    --
    $you = new YOU;
    honk() if $you->love(perl)

(strict for perl6) RE: (4) My crime of choice
by mwp (Hermit) on Oct 13, 2000 at 05:27 UTC

    I'm almost certain someone RFCd that for Perl6, although a quick scan of the RFC list yields nothing. I know for a fact it was discussed in the language mailing lists. Actually, there was a whole sub-list working group for the strict pragma!

    Perl6 RFC #16, by Daniel Chetlin makes the argument that the strict pragma should be left more or less the way it is. Here is a brief synopsis of his reasoning, which was echoed in the mailing lists when the scenario of turning strict on by default was suggested:

    =head1 ABSTRACT Perl5 is usable with no hassle as a quick-and-dirty problem-solver by default. It is ideal for one-liners, short scripts, and quick hacks that have no need for extra protection or error-checking. It is also great for large projects by making use of the C<warnings> and C<strict> pragmas. Perl6 should not make the one-liners, short scripts and hacks need to jump through extra hoops to get the "lax" behaviour which is default in Perl5; the point of using Perl as a quick-and-dirty tool is that you don't have to do anything extra.

    You can view the RFCs and mailing list archives at http://dev.perl.org/.

    Alakaboo

RE: My crime of choice
by Perlmage (Acolyte) on Oct 14, 2000 at 22:41 UTC
    Strict is _not_ a newbie pragma. Together with 'use warnings;' or '-w' it can save you hundreds of hours of debugging. When I'm interviewing a prospective applicant for the shop I work at, and I look at the applicant's code, a failure to use strict is almost always grounds for a negative recommendation. It's simply irresponsible practice to program without it. You don't need an 'expert_mode' pragma, BTW. There's already a 'no strict;' that you can turn off for blocks in which you're going to be using symbolic references or something. I agree that strict should on by default, but one of all of my 5-liners will always be 'use strict;'.

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