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Re:(dhoss) Perl is dying

by stonecolddevin (Vicar)
on Oct 25, 2006 at 10:30 UTC ( #580536=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Perl is dying

Maybe it's the fact that it's 4 am in the morning. Or maybe it's the fact that this post, albeit it slightly more evolved and coherent, is the same song and dance we've seen over,, and over and over.

My history is not up to date, nor do I have the patience/willpower to dig up stats and quotes about how perl faired in the past. All I know is, I use it now for soon-to-be large web applications (online communities, schedulers, message boards, etc.) and it works spectacular. Granted it's not as shiny and easy to use right off the bat as PHP or maybe ASP, but it gets the job done, and it gets it done well, with speed and elegance.

I'm not saying I'm solely a perl guy, I like to write my GUIs in C++/Delphi. I also am planning on porting a lot of my applications to Ruby, and Python, and creating new apps in each respective language. Why? because i want to. The fact of the matter is, perl stands as my number one web application language of choice. Regardless of whether i start to use PHP, Python, Ruby, or ASP, Perl will always have a place with what I do, not only because I've fallen in love with almost every aspect of it, but because it works, and it always has worked.

Go post how about bad we're dying on a PHP forum, maybe they'll listen and make you feel good about yourself. I'm going to bed.

meh.


Comment on Re:(dhoss) Perl is dying
Re^2: (dhoss) Perl is dying
by smithers (Friar) on Jan 11, 2007 at 04:22 UTC
    My experience lately is just the opposite -- for me Perl is thriving. I'm not CGI-centric, rather I use Perl for core Windows system administration, log file analysis, data munging, etc. and fail to see why admins would use a scripting tool other than Perl on unix or Windows. Granted, Windows Admins have VBScript at their disposal by default and it's a decent admin scripting choice but Active State perl is a snap to install and much more powerful (IMHO) than VBScript.

    One thing that's critically important to me for my Perl growth and excitement are good books (and an active community such as perlmonks). I've learned so much from many wonderful Perl book authors that I think they are one of the keys to Perl use and growth. Of course, the staple: "Perl Cookbook" was the first to open my eyes to the amazing power of Perl but I also highly value (and wish for more) Perl books catering to Windows admins. Books from Dave Roth and Linchi Shea's are gems for Windows admins and give us so much power to monitor our enterprises.

    Note: it's rewarding to proudly display my Perl library at the entrance to my cube. I've had many folks ask about and borrow my Perl books and some of those folks get quickly hooked. My two "Learning Perl" books are very worn but I feel I owe it to myself and the Perl community to play librarian with my Perl books and try to get others excited about Perl.

    Just my two cents worth.

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