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finding local minima/maxima for a discrete array

by Anonymous Monk
on Jul 31, 2007 at 06:07 UTC ( #629742=perlquestion: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??
Anonymous Monk has asked for the wisdom of the Perl Monks concerning the following question:

Hello everyone, I have been trying to do this but cannot find a module or perl code or even a simple but robust algorithm to do this. I have an integer array of size n. I need to find the top k local maxima i.e. points in array that are local maxima and their magnitude is amongst top k amongst all local maxima. Any help is greatly appreciated. And thanks for the great site ! thanks Ash

Comment on finding local minima/maxima for a discrete array
Re: finding local minima/maxima for a discrete array
by ysth (Canon) on Jul 31, 2007 at 07:00 UTC
    Do you need to find at what indexes the minima/maxima occur, or just the values? Assuming values for the moment:
    my @minima; my @maxima; my $prev_cmp = 0; for (0 .. $#array - 1) { my $cmp = $array[$_] <=> $array[$_+1]; if ($cmp != $prev_cmp) { push @minima, $array[$_] if $cmp < 0; push @maxima, $array[$_] if $cmp > 0; # when this and next elements are ==, defer checking for # minima/maxima till next loop iteration $prev_cmp = $cmp if $cmp; } } if (@array) { push @minima, $array[-1] if $prev_cmp >= 0; push @maxima, $array[-1] if $prev_cmp <= 0; }
    (untested, probably at least one bug). Then select your top k from @minima and @maxima (or replace the pushes with an insertion sort and do it on the fly.)

    Update: wow, seems to actually work. Note that I assume no NaNs in the array (see perlop for the effect of NaNs on <=>) and that the endpoints are considered minima/maxima/both (slight changes would be needed to do otherwise).

    Update2: fixed bug when array is empty :), moved $cmp check (with no effect on results) & added a comment

      You're right ysth, it does seem to work. :)

      Advice to the OP: It is a good idea for this type of problem to devise your own test suite before you start coding a solution. To demonstrate, here is a test script that I created for ysth's solution. It's not exactly comprehensive, but I attempt to take care of the most obvious of boundary conditions.

      The way it's coded, it would be easy for you to come up with a list of your own conditions that you want to test for. Or maybe rules that you would like to change. Such as is a point of inflection truly a local min or max? Your test suite can spell out what you expect or desire.
      use Test::More; use strict; ################################# # Test Data # Each element contains [ [Test Data], [Expected Min], [Expected Max] +] # Note: The reverse of any data, should simply reverse the expected re +sults. my @testdata = ( [# Empty [], [], [], ], [ # One Entry [3], [3], [3], ], [ # Two (Up slope) [2, 4], [2], [4], ], [ # Two (No slope) [3, 3], [3], [3], ], [ # Three (No slope) [4, 4, 4], [4], [4], ], [ # Three (Up slope, beginning point of inflection) [4, 4, 6], [4], [6], ], [ # Three (Up slope, ending point of inflection) [4, 6, 6], [4], [6], ], [ # Three (negative inflection) [3,6,2], [3, 2], [6], ], [ # Three (positive infection) [10, 5, 10], [5], [10, 10], ], [ # Mixed Data # mi Mi m i M i m Mi [qw(1 1 2 3 4 4 3 2 3 4 5 6 6 6 7 8 7 7 7 3 5 6 9 9)], [qw(1 2 3)], [qw(4 8 9)], ], ); # One test each for min and max, and then times two for reverse. plan tests => 2 * (2 * @testdata); ################################# # Tests foreach (@testdata) { my ($data, $min, $max) = @$_; my ($rmin, $rmax) = local_min_max(@$data); is_deeply($rmin, $min, "min of [@$data]"); is_deeply($rmax, $max, "max of [@$data]"); my @reversed = reverse @$data; ($rmin, $rmax) = local_min_max(@reversed); is_deeply($rmin, [reverse @$min], "min of [@reversed]"); is_deeply($rmax, [reverse @$max], "max of [@reversed]"); } ################################# # Functions sub local_min_max { # Boundary Conditions return ([], []) if @_ == 0; return ([@_], [@_]) if @_ == 1; my @array = @_; my @minima; my @maxima; my $prev_cmp = 0; for (0 .. $#array - 1) { my $cmp = $array[$_] <=> $array[$_+1]; if ($cmp && $cmp != $prev_cmp) { push @minima, $array[$_] if $cmp < 0; push @maxima, $array[$_] if $cmp > 0; $prev_cmp = $cmp; } } push @minima, $array[-1] if $prev_cmp >= 0; push @maxima, $array[-1] if $prev_cmp <= 0; return (\@minima, \@maxima); }
      Ok, now back to less amusing problems.

      - Miller
Re: finding local minima/maxima for a discrete array
by wind (Priest) on Jul 31, 2007 at 07:19 UTC
    I do not yet know of a specific module for finding local maxima. However, for global maxima and minima use List Util.
    use List::Util qw(max min); my @array = qw(5 7 3 25 10 15 8); my $max = max(@array); my $min = min(@array);
    - Miller
Re: finding local minima/maxima for a discrete array
by oha (Friar) on Jul 31, 2007 at 10:07 UTC
    i found another way, a bit faster probably:
    my $d1 = 0; my @min; my @max; for(0 .. $#data-1) { my $d = $data[$_+1]-$data[$_]; push @{ $d<0 ? \@max : \@min }, [$_, $data[$_]] if $d*$d1<=0 && $d!=0 $d1 = $d; } if($d1>0) {push @max, [$#data, $data[-1]];} if($d1<0) {push @min, [$#data, $data[-1]];} print "max $$_[1] at $$_[0]\n" for(sort {$b[1] <=> $a[1]} @max); print "min $$_[1] at $$_[0]\n" for(sort {$a[1] <=> $b[1]} @min);
    $d*$d1 will be negative when the sign of $d and $d1 does not match, meaning that the the values passed from increasing to decreasing or vice-versa

    Oha

      You can't do the $d1 = $d when $d is 0 or you treat the transition between 2 and 3 as significant in 1 2 2 3. I think your $d * $d1 <= 0 && $d != 0 is the same (only slightly slower, not faster as you guess) as $d && $d != $d1 with $d set by <=> instead of -. With the final checks after the for loop being > and < , it's treated as neither a minimum or maximum when the whole array is equal; with >= and <= instead it's treated as both. You could argue for either way.
Re: finding local minima/maxima for a discrete array
by Anno (Deacon) on Jul 31, 2007 at 10:16 UTC
    ...need to find the top k local maxima

    ysth has shown a nice method to find local maxima in an array. I'd like to add that it isn't necessary to store (and sort) all maxima if only the top $k are needed. A heap data structure minimizes both time- and space requirements of the task.

    Assuming a mythical Heap class with methods new, insert, extract_min, and size, create a heap

    my $heap = Heap->new;
    and then for each new local maximum $max:
    $heap->insert( $max); $heap->extract_min if $heap->size > $k;
    (This step can be optimized a little more.)

    After all are done,

    map $heap->extract_min, 1 .. $heap->size;
    returns the top $k maxima (or as many as there are) in ascending order.

    CPAN has a couple of heap-implementations.

    In practice, quite often the expense of storing and sorting the full array is irrelevant, so the heap solution isn't often implemented. I still like to point out the alternative whenever a "top $k" problem comes up.

    Anno

Re: finding local minima/maxima for a discrete array
by DrHyde (Prior) on Jul 31, 2007 at 10:46 UTC
    The algorithm is simple. Find all local maxima, for some appropriate definition of a maximum (eg, $_[0] < $_[1] > $_[2] might mean that $_[1] qualifies). Sort that list of maxima by value in descending order. Return the first k entries in the list.

    so ...

    my @values = qw(1 4 3 2 5 6 3 4 2); my @maxima = (); my $k = 2; foreach my $index (1 .. $#values - 1) { push @maxima, $values[$index] if( $values[$index-1] < $values[$index] && $values[$index+1] < $values[$index] ); } # @maxima now contains qw(4 6 4); print join(', ', (sort { $a <=> $b } @maxima)[0 .. $k - 1])."\n";
    Finding the indices of the top k maxima is left as a trivial exercise for the reader (hint: push a structure onto @maxima containing the value and index).
      That's a little oversimplified. In the case of 1 2 2 1, 2 is a local maximum. In 3 2 2 3, 2 is a local minimum. In 1 2 2 3, it's neither. You can't tell them apart just looking at the adjacent elements.

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