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Re^2: Slow evolution of Perl = Perl is a closed Word

by Taulmarill (Deacon)
on Aug 31, 2007 at 11:27 UTC ( #636298=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Re: Slow evolution of Perl = Perl is a closed Word
in thread Slow evolution of Perl = Perl is a closed Word

First of all, i have to say that everything about IDEs is IMO a question of personal preferences. There is no absolute answer.
I use vim with auto indent and no syntax highlighting. This is, because first of all vim is immensely powerful. Also i like the fact, that my hands don't have to leave the keyboard for using the mouse ... ever. Also i think using a terminal window with 80x24 chars is motivating to write compact and elegant code. This also makes me think more about the code i write, which IMO results in better quality code.
What most IDEs do i just do in multiple terminal windows. I.e. keeping track of log or error files using tail, starting a debugger and so on. Many functions build in IDEs are there to replace common CLI tools anyway.

I'll admit that i have not spend that much time looking at and working with IDEs, so maybe I've just not seen the light yet...


Comment on Re^2: Slow evolution of Perl = Perl is a closed Word
Re^3: Slow evolution of Perl = Perl is a closed Word
by dsheroh (Parson) on Aug 31, 2007 at 16:32 UTC
    In the past, I've spent a lot of time working in IDEs, mostly because I was using proprietary languages where the IDE and the compiler were tightly coupled. Some were pretty good, others not so much. I've come away from it convinced that an IDE is a terrific tool for developing GUIs, since you can get all the draggy-droppy form creation and so forth.

    But I've never much liked making GUIs. I mostly write back-end server code by preference and web apps by necessity (i.e., that's where most of the paying work seems to be), so my preferred "IDE", like yours, consists of several xterms running some mix of vim, bash, tail, top, or maybe a couple other things and a nearby Firefox window, whether for testing web code in development, looking up reference materials, or occasionally dropping by the monastery to check out the latest rumors of Perl's demise.

Re^3: Slow evolution of Perl = Perl is a closed Word
by Anonymous Monk on Sep 01, 2007 at 03:44 UTC
    "First of all, i have to say that everything about IDEs is IMO a question of personal preferences..."

    This is just the answer of how thinks that use just VI to code is beautiful, which thinks that a really good programmer only uses fingers. The point is that IDE really makes coding faster! We have a lot of scientific researches that shows that.

    I was like you years ago, thinking that an IDE is not very important. But when you start to win time you will stop to say that. Is like to say that we donít need cars to go faster to a place.

      We have a lot of scientific researches that shows that.

      I'd like to look at that research. Can you share some of those links? Thanks!

      Hey! I'm not against IDEs... just so long as the text editing mode has a full vi mapping, I'm set.

      There is such a thing as having the best of both worlds.

      • another intruder with the mooring in the heart of the Perl

      There are plenty of cases where cars are not faster. For example, if I want to buy some milk or a newspaper, it is much faster to walk to my local shop than it would be to get out my car, drive there, find somewhere to park, etc; if I want to visit another city, it can be a lot faster to cycle to the station and take a train. And if I want to visit another continent, my car is totally useless!

      In short, the car is only the fastest solution for a certain type of journey (a distance of between maybe 2 and 100 miles, or to a destination that is not well served by public transport). In the same way, an IDE is only obviously superior to a general-purpose text editor like vi or emacs for a certain type of programming project.

      For enterprise architecture in Java, an IDE has big advantages. But for short programs that glue a couple of CPAN modules together for a one-off task? It's probably quicker to walk.

        You are 100% correct.

        I think that the point is that I'm always thinking in medium to big projects, where we have at least 4 developers, and an IDE to manage the code and share it, thing that Eclipse does very well, is very important.

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