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Re: capturing STDOUT

by jmcnamara (Monsignor)
on Apr 30, 2001 at 03:04 UTC ( #76522=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to capturing STDOUT


Spreadsheet::WriteExcel accepts a valid filehandle as an argument to new() as of version 0.31. The best way to achieve what you want is via a tied scalar and the IO::Scalar module which is part of the IO::Stringy distribution. For example:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w use strict; use Spreadsheet::WriteExcel; use IO::Scalar; # Write an Excel file to a string via IO::Scalar. # Refer to the IO::Scalar documentation for further details. # my $a; tie *XLS, 'IO::Scalar', \$a; # Create a spreadsheet and write something to it. # my $workbook = Spreadsheet::WriteExcel->new(\*XLS); my $worksheet = $workbook->addworksheet(); $worksheet->write(0, 0, "Hi Excel!"); $workbook->close(); # This is required # The Excel file is now in $a. As a demonstration, print it to a f +ile. # open TMP, "> test.xls"; binmode(TMP); print TMP $a;
There are further examples of using filehandles with Spreadsheet::WriteExcel in the filehandle.pl program that is in the examples directory of the distribution.

John.
--


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Re: Re: capturing STDOUT
by nop (Hermit) on May 02, 2001 at 01:48 UTC
    The cgi.pl example in the distro takes a different approach:
    #!/usr/bin/perl -w ###################################################################### +######### # # Example of how to use the Spreadsheet::WriteExcel module to send an +Excel # file to a browser in a CGI program. # # On Windows the hash-bang line should be something like: # #!C:\Perl\bin\perl.exe # # Dec 2000, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org # use strict; use Spreadsheet::WriteExcel; # Set the filename and send the content type my $filename ="cgitest.xls"; print "Content-type: application/vnd.ms-excel\n"; print "Content-Disposition: attachment; filename=$filename\n\n"; # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet. The special Perl filehand +le - will # redirect the output to STDOUT # my $workbook = Spreadsheet::WriteExcel->new("-"); my $worksheet = $workbook->addworksheet(); # Set the column width for column 1 $worksheet->set_column(0, 0, 20); # Create a format my $format = $workbook->addformat(); $format->set_bold(); $format->set_size(15); $format->set_color('blue'); # Write to the workbook $worksheet->write(0, 0, "Hi Excel!", $format);
    On my browser, this (1) prompts "do you want to open or save this downloaded file?" and (2) opens TWO windows, one blank. Ugh. Can you comment on your excellent tie soln above, and the alternative as per cgi.pl? Thanks!

      On my browser, this (1) prompts "do you want to open or save this downloaded file?" and (2) opens TWO windows, one blank.

      As to why you see two windows, I cannot say. I cannot replicate this behaviour. Maybe someone with more CGI experience could explain this. However, I have noted some small differences in the way Netscape and IE handle the example program. The joys of CGI and browsers, I guess. %^)

      If you wish to stream the file to Excel you can set the Content-type as follows:     print "Content-type: application/vnd.ms-excel\n\n";
      If you wish to prompt the user to view the file or save it with a specified filename you can do something like the following:
      my $filename ="cgitest.xls"; print "Content-type: application/vnd.ms-excel\n"; print "Content-Disposition: attachment; filename=$filename\n\n";
      The example that you posted has been updated in more recent versions of the module to highlight these options. However, the view or save options can be overridden by the client browser.


      Can you comment on your tie soln above, and the alternative as per cgi.pl?

      In a CGI program you have to redirect the Excel file to STDOUT. The easiest way to do this is to use the "Minus" file as a file name in the constructor:     my $workbook = Spreadsheet::WriteExcel->new("-");
      The "Minus" file is documented in perlopentut*. The comment in the above example refers to it as a filehandle but it isn't, it is a file name.

      As such you do not need to use tie at all in this situation. You would only need to use the above technique if you wanted to do something unusual such as stream the file to a browser and save a local copy.

      The option of passing filehandles to the constructor was introduced mainly to allow the files to be streamed over sockets and to allow Spreadsheet::WriteExcel to work with mod_perl.

      John.
      --
      * Does anyone know of anywhere else that this is documented?

        My below is script not generating STDOUT in browser. I followed the instructions u have given bt didn't work.. Can someone help on this..

        #!/appl/CW_NETCOOL/PERL/bin/perl use strict; use Spreadsheet::WriteExcel; use CGI qw(:standard); # Set the filename and send the content type my $filename ="cgitest.xls"; print "Content-type: application/vnd.ms-excel\n"; #print "Content-Disposition: attachment; filename=$filename\n\n"; # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet. The special Perl filehand +le will # redirect the output to STDOUT # binmode(STDOUT); my $workbook = Spreadsheet::WriteExcel->new(\*STDOUT); my $worksheet = $workbook->addworksheet(); # Set the column width for column 1 $worksheet->set_column(0, 0, 20); # Create a format my $format = $workbook->addformat(); $format->set_bold(); $format->set_size(15); $format->set_color('blue'); # Write to the workbook $worksheet->write(0, 0, "Hi Excel!", $format); $workbook->close;

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