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Re^7: The current state of Perl6

by Your Mother (Canon)
on Apr 19, 2010 at 16:39 UTC ( #835539=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Re^6: The current state of Perl6
in thread The current state of Perl6

Well, it annoys me when one insists that another must make a judgement call for one. It's worse than dishonest. It's abdication.

Perl 6 is obviously not ready for what 99% of shops would call production. On the other hand, it's an extremely interesting language that can do a lot already and if I were doing a start-up with at least one really smart hacker, I might just base the code on it at this point to get ahead of the curve. Otherwise, it might be nice to use for internal, non-critical tools just to get the exposure, chops, and start giving feedback, test, and bug reports so it can be ready for prime time sooner.


Comment on Re^7: The current state of Perl6
Re^8: The current state of Perl6
by Anonymous Monk on Apr 19, 2010 at 16:57 UTC

    the start-up idea sounds reasonable, but how would Perl6 put you ahead of the curve ?

    start giving feedback, test, and bug reports so it can be ready for prime time sooner
    this is interesting. but because there only so many(few) active Perl6 people how will your bug reports and tests help ? maybe they have other priorities than what you think is prioritary and they will focus on those while implementing or fixing bugs ?

      The Perl 6 effort is very well organized at this point and doing regular releases etc. I don't think they have a problem with too much feedback, but too little. Though I may be projecting a bit here. Most of us love feedback and help getting good tests into a project.

      I see Perl 6 as an extremely interesting, potential killer-app-language. Just having Moose makes Perl, to me, better than Ruby and Python. The Class::MOP-ish piece of Perl 6 is just a small slice of what's coming. As a language it could hit the sweet spot between a ton of previous design concerns, failings, successes in many languages. It could be the only high level language anyone would want to use five years from now.

      It could also flop for any or all of the reasons detractors and critics cite. I'm impressed with it and recent dev efforts, however, and I see its realized success increasing. It's at the tipping point for me where I'd like to start rewriting some selected modules of my own in it. No tuits, as usual, but I'm certainly getting more interested in trying/participating.

      Also, viva Perl 5! I love Perl 5 and am also impressed and happy with some of the new philosophical changes in its care and feeding.

      Isn't it awesome to be able to be here? To have a stable, lovely, actively developed language that's so great in addition to an experimental, advanced outgrowth of it?

      (update s/kill/killer/)

        You haven't told me how choosing Perl6 puts you ahead of the curve

        To have a stable, lovely, actively developed language that's so great in addition to an experimental, advanced outgrowth of it?

        yes the problem is that the experimental one is too experimental and there are dissensions about wether it is experimental or not presumably because people like chromatic specifically say they don't care what production-ready means for other people(normally if you don't care for some particular subject being discussed you shouldn't join the discussion at all, but instead he does and he says he doesn't care).

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