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Re^4: eval to replace die?

by chromatic (Archbishop)
on Oct 04, 2010 at 14:43 UTC ( #863350=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Re^3: eval to replace die?
in thread eval to replace die?

I agree that it's difficult to use exception objects pervasively (especially when using other code), and I wouldn't have enabled this rule for Perl::Critic by default myself, but it's very much worth considering the risk and fragility of string comparisons for exception handling.


Comment on Re^4: eval to replace die?
Re^5: eval to replace die?
by BrowserUk (Pope) on Oct 04, 2010 at 15:48 UTC
    the risk and fragility of string comparisons for exception handling.

    Even in Java, it's still "string compare". It's done at compile-time rather than run-time, which is good. But it is still string compare.

    But Exception::Class does not give you that advantage.


    Examine what is said, not who speaks -- Silence betokens consent -- Love the truth but pardon error.
    "Science is about questioning the status quo. Questioning authority".
    In the absence of evidence, opinion is indistinguishable from prejudice.

      I should be more precise, you're right.

      Imagine instead I wrote "the risk and fragility of using fuzzy regular expression matches for exception handling, especially when type checks and polymorphism are much more reliable".

        Imagine instead I wrote "the risk and fragility of using fuzzy regular expression matches for exception handling, especially when type checks and polymorphism are much more reliable".

        And I say you are talking bollocks.

        • Because "type checks" are just string compares.

          Pretty much exactly:

          if( ref( $obj ) eq $type ) { ... ## or if( $obj =~ m[=$type$] ) { ...
          .
        • And polymorphism--of the type you are alluding to--is just multiple string compares.

          Pretty much:

          if( ref( $exception ) eq $type ) or grep{ ref( $exception ) eq $_ } @{ $type::ISA } ) { ... ## or if( $exception =~ m[=$type$] or grep{ $exception =~ m[=$_] } @{ $type::ISA } ) { ...

        which demonstrates the lie of "more reliable, never mind "much more reliable.

        You are selling a philosophy--your own home-spun, personal prejudice--on the basis of a technical merit which it simply does not live up to.

        Exception::Class exceptions are:

        1. defined in terms of strings:
          use Exception::Class ( 'MyException', 'AnotherException' => { isa => 'MyException' },
        2. thrown in terms of strings: MyExceptions->throw( error => 'Divisor undefined' ) unless defined $d;
        3. and caught in terms of strings: if ( $e = Exception::Class->caught('MyException') ) {

        Which means you're even more reliant upon string compares, but now you have more places to change in order to maintain them.

        I really wonder if you think through your justifictions at all. It sure doesn't look like it.


        Examine what is said, not who speaks -- Silence betokens consent -- Love the truth but pardon error.
        "Science is about questioning the status quo. Questioning authority".
        In the absence of evidence, opinion is indistinguishable from prejudice.

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