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Win32/Linux portability

by thelycaeum (Initiate)
on Aug 03, 2011 at 17:12 UTC ( #918334=perlquestion: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??
thelycaeum has asked for the wisdom of the Perl Monks concerning the following question:

Hi all, I have a question:

Is there a function like chomp that removes carriage returns?

Comment on Win32/Linux portability
Re: Win32/Linux portability
by zek152 (Pilgrim) on Aug 03, 2011 at 17:27 UTC

    My guess is that $output contains a "\r" at the end.

    #! /usr/bin/perl $somenum=5; $output="text.txt\r"; $output2="text.txt"; print " $somenum means that, $output has info.\n"; print " $somenum means that, $output2 has info.\n"; #OUTPUT # has info.s that, text.txt # 5 means that, text.txt has info.

    Without more context I can't provide more help.

    To get rid of a carriage return you can:

    $output =~ s/\r//g;

    Update: The OP changed the post so most of the info is out of context. The last remark should answer the current question.

      Original content (with tags cleaned up; no other changes):

      Hi all,

      I have a question:

      When I try to use a coed line like

      print "  $somenumber means that, $output has info.\n";

      I get different screen outputs in Windows and Linux (tried different shells).

      In windows it looks like it's supposed to be, which is:

      3 means that, text.txt has info.

      But under Linux it looks like this:

      has info.hat, text.txt

      So it looks like it goes back to the start of the line and overwrites the first part of the string after a variable is supposed to be printed. Why is that?

      ---------------------------------

      ww observes that the output shown does not support the supposition of the OP (immediately above)... BASED on the info supplied.

      OP: This is why we urge that you post sufficient code to reproduce the problem; at least a snippet of sample data; error messages (verbatim) if any; and (the only one you gave us) how the output fails to satisfy your expectations/desires. Please see:

      And please do not delete content you've posted. Use <strike>...</strike> if you must delete something, and mark updates with notice thereof....like this:

      Update: Added matter below the dashes; then reupdated to fix typos and markup.

Re: Win32/Linux portability
by jethro (Monsignor) on Aug 03, 2011 at 17:41 UTC
    No, but a simple regex will do that:  $line=~s/\r//g;
Re: Win32/Linux portability
by ikegami (Pope) on Aug 03, 2011 at 18:18 UTC

    chomp removes whatever you tell it to via $/.

    But you might be better off just using s/\s+\z//; instead of chomp;. Note: It removes trailing space and other whitespace in the process. That's usually a good thing.

      Thanks for your replies, I'm new to Perl so I'm not fit with that abbreviated syntax, e.g. "s/\s+\z//". I guess I'll stick with telling chomp how to handle arguments. I thought about something like:
      if (uc($^O)=~"WIN") {$/="\r\n"}

        I thought about something like:

        No need for that. See perlintro and use

        s/\r\n\z//; # or $line =~ s/\r\n\z//;
Re: Win32/Linux portability
by planetscape (Canon) on Aug 03, 2011 at 18:52 UTC

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