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Re: Hex String XOR

by rovf (Priest)
on Mar 12, 2012 at 09:25 UTC ( #959096=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Hex String XOR

I give an input of say "aabbcc" and I want to XOR with "112233". The answer should be "bb99ff"

my $s='112233'; my $t='aabbcc'; my $x=hex($s)^hex($t); printf('%0x', $x);

-- 
Ronald Fischer <ynnor@mm.st>


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Re^2: Hex String XOR
by moritz (Cardinal) on Mar 12, 2012 at 09:52 UTC

    Note that this solution too is limited by the size of the biggest integer you can store in a perl scalar, which is usally 52 bit from the mantissa of a double precision floating point, or 64 bit for an integer on 64bit platforms (not sure about the sign, so could be 63 usable bits for this purpose).

      Here's a solution that works on hex strings, so allows you to work with hex numbers larger than the maximum integers Perl can handle...

      use 5.010; use strict; use Carp qw/croak/; use List::Util qw/max/; sub xor_strings { croak "should be passed two arguments" unless @_==2; state $chunk_size = 4; state $pattern = sprintf '%%0%dx', $chunk_size; # Make strings equal length, and a multiple of $chunk_size. my $length = max(map { length $_ } @_); $length += $chunk_size - ($length % $chunk_size); my @strings = map { ('0'x($length - length $_)) . $_ } @_; # Join results of each chunk return join q{}, map { # Parse chunk hex to an integer my $i = $_; my @nums = map { hex substr $_, $i*$chunk_size, $chunk_siz +e } @strings; # Xor them and convert to hex. sprintf $pattern, $nums[0] ^ $nums[1] } 0 .. ($length/$chunk_size)-1; } say xor_strings( '112233112233112233112233112233112233112233112233112233', 'aabbccaabbccaabbccaabbccaabbccaabbccaabbccaabbcc112233', );

      The chunk size of 4 is fairly conservative. It means that the string in processed in four-digit (i.e. 16 bit) chunks. You can probably get a minor speed up using a larger chunk size if you know that your computer will be able to handle it. The returned value will be left-padded with zeroes to be a length that is a multiple of the chunk size.

      perl -E'sub Monkey::do{say$_,for@_,do{($monkey=[caller(0)]->[3])=~s{::}{ }and$monkey}}"Monkey say"->Monkey::do'

        tobyink,

        Reading the Camel book (3rd and 4th editions), "...if both operands are strings...the operators do bitwise operations between corresponding bits from the two strings. In this case there's no arbitrary limit..."

        So the following code should work (untested) and be faster than calling a subroutine and looping:

        my $result = '112233112233112233112233112233112233112233112233112233' +^ 'aabbccaabbccaabbccaabbccaabbccaabbccaabbccaabbcc112233';

        I used this technique to generate a 8-byte CRC for arbitrary text strings by using 'substr' to take 8-byte substrings. I needed the looping for that.

        Regards...Ed

        "Well done is better than well said." - Benjamin Franklin

      "^" converts floats to machine integers, so you're limited to 32/64, not 5253/64.

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