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Re: Skip a row of csv file.

by aaron_baugher (Deacon)
on May 04, 2012 at 02:43 UTC ( #968850=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Skip a row of csv file.

Have you tried printing the return value of your substr function? That might offer a clue.

For what it's worth, while this solution will work (once you get the length right), I think most monks would use a regex:

if( $data[0] =~ /^A\.SERIAL_NUMBER\|\|/ ){

Aaron B.
My Woefully Neglected Blog, where I occasionally mention Perl.


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Re^2: Skip a row of csv file.
by Tux (Monsignor) on May 04, 2012 at 06:15 UTC

    If the data is indeed CSV, and not pipe-separated, most monks would use a CSV parser and write

    while (my $row = $csv->getline ($fh)) { $row->[0] eq "A.SERIAL_NUMBER||" and next; :

    Giving the OP's code, I seriously doubt however that it is a CSV file.

    If the file is a pipe-separated-value file, that can also be read with Text::CSV or Text::CSV_XS.


    Enjoy, Have FUN! H.Merijn
Re^2: Skip a row of csv file.
by TomDLux (Vicar) on May 04, 2012 at 18:02 UTC

    While many people do use regular expressions, I think that's like using an M16 to crack walnuts.

    R.E. are the appropriate solution when you have variable components, but testing a constant string is precisely what 'eq' is for.

    As Occam said: Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem.

      You make a good point, but I found myself wondering how the combination of substr, length, and eq would compare to a single anchored regex, so I did a benchmark. I'm convinced!

      bannor:~/work/perl/monks$ cat 968838.pl #!/usr/bin/env perl use Modern::Perl; use Benchmark qw(:all); my $str = 'A.SERIAL_NUMBER||abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'; my $ss = 'A.SERIAL_NUMBER||'; my $yay; cmpthese( 10_000_000, { 'substr' => sub { if(substr($str,0,length($ss)) eq $ss ){ $yay = 1; } }, 'regex' => sub { if( $str =~ /^\Q$ss\E/ ){ $yay = 1; } }, }); bannor:~/work/perl/monks$ perl 968838.pl Rate regex substr regex 1312336/s -- -65% substr 3802281/s 190% --

      Aaron B.
      My Woefully Neglected Blog, where I occasionally mention Perl.

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