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Re^2: Is it possible to find the number of matching and non-matching positions in strings using perl code?

by sauoq (Abbot)
on May 11, 2012 at 11:26 UTC ( #969982=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Re: Is it possible to find the number of matching and non-matching positions in strings using perl code?
in thread Is it possible to find the number of matching and non-matching positions in strings using perl code?

Thanks for explaining what I was doing here: Re^2: Is it possible to find the number of matching and non-matching positions in strings using perl code? But the for loop just obfuscates things without adding anything at all. Also, calling your variable $mask is questionable as you don't really intend to use it as a mask.

-sauoq
"My two cents aren't worth a dime.";


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Re^3: Is it possible to find the number of matching and non-matching positions in strings using perl code?
by moritz (Cardinal) on May 11, 2012 at 12:25 UTC
    But the for loop just obfuscates things without adding anything at all.

    It adds generality beyond three strings to compare.

    Also, calling your variable $mask is questionable as you don't really intend to use it as a mask.

    So what do you suggest instead? Your usage of $bits isn't any better, because you don't care about bits, but bytes. But $bytes also wouldn't explain the purpose of the variable.

      It adds generality beyond three strings to compare.

      I might give you that if you wrote it that way. for ($b, $c) isn't any more general than my single statement. We'd both have to go change our code if we suddenly had to compare 4 strings.

      So what do you suggest instead? Your usage of $bits isn't any better, because you don't care about bits, but bytes.

      I'm not suggesting it's a good name for anything more than a throwaway example, but I wouldn't say it isn't any better. I do actually care about bits as I'm using it with bitwise operators. And the real point is that calling it $mask implies that you intend to use it as a mask. When you don't, confusion results.

      -sauoq
      "My two cents aren't worth a dime.";

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