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Re^2: Extracting values from nested hashrefs

by loris (Hermit)
on Sep 12, 2012 at 09:35 UTC ( #993199=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Re: Extracting values from nested hashrefs
in thread Extracting values from nested hashrefs

Ah, sorry, my example was too simple. It should have been like this:

my $animals = { gnu => { humps => 0, mascot_for => 'emacs', }, dromedary => { humps => 1, mascot_for => 'perl', }, camel => { humps => 2, mascot_for => 'perl', }, };

BTW, implicit traversing is OK; I just wanted to avoid some sort of loop with , say while.

Thanks,

loris


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Re^3: Extracting values from nested hashrefs
by choroba (Abbot) on Sep 12, 2012 at 09:45 UTC
    You can use
    map $_->{humps}, values %$animals;
    If your structure becomes even more complicated (e.g. different level of nesting), you should use recursion (or CPAN).
    لսႽ ᥲᥒ⚪⟊Ⴙᘓᖇ Ꮅᘓᖇ⎱ Ⴙᥲ𝇋ƙᘓᖇ
Re^3: Extracting values from nested hashrefs
by Athanasius (Monsignor) on Sep 12, 2012 at 12:46 UTC

    Here is an approach that should work no matter how complicated your data structure becomes (provided the data you want remains in the form humps => d):

    #! perl use strict; use warnings; use Data::Dumper; my $animals = { gnu => { humps => 0, mascot_for => 'emacs', }, dromedary => { humps => 1, mascot_for => 'perl', }, camel => { humps => 2, mascot_for => 'perl', }, }; my $flat = Dumper($animals); print "$1\n" while $flat =~ / 'humps' \s+ => \s+ (\d+) /gx;

    Output:

    2 0 1

    TMTOWTDI.

    Athanasius <°(((><contra mundum

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