Beefy Boxes and Bandwidth Generously Provided by pair Networks
Perl: the Markov chain saw
 
PerlMonks  

Comment on

( #3333=superdoc: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??

Update: Thanks to linuxer for pointing out that the original data were modified by the functions and therefore after the first call the other functions had a smaller data set. Here is the corrected version and the results.

Updated again: realized I had warnings turned on and the nithins code warnings slowed down the benchmark a bunch when they printed to STDERR. Fixed the nithins approach.

As I've seen BrowserUK do before I replaced the toy data set with something more realistic and the nithins approach became the slowest.

I started with 10^6 and then 10^5 elements in the range but got warnings about too few iterations to make a comparison.

#!/usr/bin/perl + use Benchmark qw ( :hireswallclock cmpthese timethese ); use strict; # use warnings; use Set::Scalar; use Data::Dumper; use List::Compare; # our @arcb = ( 450, 625, 720, 645 ); # our @arca = ( 625, 645 ); our @arcb = grep {$_ % 2} (1..10000); our @arca = grep {not $_ % 5} (1..10000); sub davido { #our @arcb; #our @arca; local @arcb = @arcb; local @arca = @arca; @arcb = do { my %exclude; @exclude{@arca} = (); grep { !exists $exclude{$_} } @arcb; }; # print "@arcb\n"; } sub karlgoethebier { #our @arcb; #our @arca; local @arcb = @arcb; local @arca = @arca; my $s1 = Set::Scalar->new(@arcb); my $s2 = Set::Scalar->new(@arca); @arcb = @{ $s1 - $s2 }; # print Dumper( \@arcb ); } sub Lotus1 { #our @arcb; #our @arca; local @arcb = @arcb; local @arca = @arca; my $lc = List::Compare->new( \@arca, \@arcb ); @arcb = $lc->get_Ronly; # print "arcb: @arcb\n"; } sub LanX { my ( %arcb, %arca ); #our @arcb; #our @arca; local @arcb = @arcb; local @arca = @arca; @arcb{@arcb} = (); # @arca{@arca} = (); update here delete @arcb{@arca}; @arcb = keys %arcb; # print Dumper( \@arcb ); } sub linuxer { #our @arcb; #our @arca; local @arcb = @arcb; local @arca = @arca; my %unwanted; $unwanted{$_}++ for @arca; @arcb = grep { !$unwanted{$_} } @arcb; # print "@arcb\n"; } sub nithins { #our @arcb; #our @arca; local @arcb = @arcb; local @arca = @arca; foreach my $a (@arca) { for ( my $i = 0 ; $i < scalar(@arcb) ; $i++ ) { #delete $arcb[$i] if ( $a == $arcb[$i] ); #fixed the warnings by using splice splice @arcb,$i,1 if ( $a == $arcb[$i] ); } } # print "@arcb"; } # karlgoethebier; # Lotus1; # LanX; # davido; # linuxer; # nithins; my $results = timethese( -20, { 'karlgoethebier' => 'karlgoethebier', 'Lotus1' => 'Lotus1', 'LanX' => 'LanX', 'davido' => 'davido', 'linuxer' => 'linuxer', 'nithins' => 'nithins', } ); cmpthese($results); __END__ Benchmark: running LanX, Lotus1, davido, karlgoethebier, linuxer, nith +ins for at least 20 CPU seconds... LanX: 21.5303 wallclock secs (21.14 usr + 0.38 sys = 21.52 CPU) + @ 143.25/s (n=3082) Lotus1: 20.4152 wallclock secs (20.27 usr + 0.14 sys = 20.41 CPU) + @ 24.55/s (n=501) davido: 20.1223 wallclock secs (19.72 usr + 0.38 sys = 20.09 CPU) + @ 110.78/s (n=2226) karlgoethebier: 22.1035 wallclock secs (22.06 usr + 0.03 sys = 22.09 +CPU) @ 22.22/s (n=491) linuxer: 21.5713 wallclock secs (21.14 usr + 0.42 sys = 21.56 CPU) + @ 147.39/s (n=3178) nithins: 21.1337 wallclock secs (21.09 usr + 0.00 sys = 21.09 CPU) + @ 0.66/s (n=14) Rate nithins karlgoethebier Lotus1 davido La +nX linuxer nithins 0.664/s -- -97% -97% -99% -10 +0% -100% karlgoethebier 22.2/s 3248% -- -9% -80% -8 +4% -85% Lotus1 24.6/s 3599% 10% -- -78% -8 +3% -83% davido 111/s 16590% 398% 351% -- -2 +3% -25% LanX 143/s 21482% 545% 483% 29% +-- -3% linuxer 147/s 22106% 563% 500% 33% +3% -- Note: the results below are the original version with the modified dat +a sets from the commented out 'our' array declarations. Benchmark: running LanX, Lotus1, davido, karlgoethebier, linuxer, nith +ins for at least 20 CPU seconds... LanX: 24.0026 wallclock secs (22.73 usr + 0.00 sys = 22.73 CPU) + @ 608.25/s (n=13828) Lotus1: 22.2431 wallclock secs (21.50 usr + 0.30 sys = 21.80 CPU) + @ 27.53/s (n=600) davido: 20.17 wallclock secs (19.81 usr + 0.33 sys = 20.14 CPU) @ + 199.25/s (n=4013) karlgoethebier: 20.2918 wallclock secs (19.95 usr + 0.33 sys = 20.28 +CPU) @ 14.35/s (n=291) linuxer: 20.1558 wallclock secs (19.87 usr + 0.26 sys = 20.14 CPU) + @ 321.91/s (n=6483) nithins: 20.9194 wallclock secs (20.89 usr + 0.00 sys = 20.89 CPU) + @ 0.77/s (n=16) Rate nithins karlgoethebier Lotus1 davido linuxe +r LanX nithins 0.766/s -- -95% -97% -100% -100 +% -100% karlgoethebier 14.3/s 1773% -- -48% -93% -96 +% -98% Lotus1 27.5/s 3494% 92% -- -86% -91 +% -95% davido 199/s 25915% 1289% 624% -- -38 +% -67% linuxer 322/s 41932% 2144% 1069% 62% - +- -47% LanX 608/s 79319% 4139% 2110% 205% 89 +% --

updated with LanX's update


In reply to Re^2: Removing elemets from an array by Lotus1
in thread Removing elemets from an array by lovelyMonk

Title:
Use:  <p> text here (a paragraph) </p>
and:  <code> code here </code>
to format your post; it's "PerlMonks-approved HTML":



  • Posts are HTML formatted. Put <p> </p> tags around your paragraphs. Put <code> </code> tags around your code and data!
  • Read Where should I post X? if you're not absolutely sure you're posting in the right place.
  • Please read these before you post! —
  • Posts may use any of the Perl Monks Approved HTML tags:
    a, abbr, b, big, blockquote, br, caption, center, col, colgroup, dd, del, div, dl, dt, em, font, h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6, hr, i, ins, li, ol, p, pre, readmore, small, span, spoiler, strike, strong, sub, sup, table, tbody, td, tfoot, th, thead, tr, tt, u, ul, wbr
  • Outside of code tags, you may need to use entities for some characters:
            For:     Use:
    & &amp;
    < &lt;
    > &gt;
    [ &#91;
    ] &#93;
  • Link using PerlMonks shortcuts! What shortcuts can I use for linking?
  • See Writeup Formatting Tips and other pages linked from there for more info.
  • Log In?
    Username:
    Password:

    What's my password?
    Create A New User
    Chatterbox?
    and the web crawler heard nothing...

    How do I use this? | Other CB clients
    Other Users?
    Others romping around the Monastery: (7)
    As of 2014-08-30 03:58 GMT
    Sections?
    Information?
    Find Nodes?
    Leftovers?
      Voting Booth?

      The best computer themed movie is:











      Results (291 votes), past polls