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I think Perl is not a good first language. Sure, there might be a few successes, but just go read comp.lang.perl.misc for a month and see how often and horribly it can go wrong.

Perl is a powerful, but dangerous language. We don't learn people how to drive using a Ferrari, people don't learn to fly in an F-16 jet, nor do people learn how to read using Shakespeares plays. Why should computer languages be any different? It's good to have training wheels. Many language IMO are much more suited to learn programming. To name a few: Pascal, Python, Java, and Haskell. Probably Eiffel as well.

Perl is not suitable for everyone. In fact, I believe that more than 75% of the people currently using Perl should be using a different language (or maybe not even program at all). Using Perl as a first language only increases the number of bad programmers, further clogs forums like comp.lang.perl.misc and contributes to the bad name Perl already has.

Abigail


In reply to Re: Learning Perl as a First (programming) language by Abigail-II
in thread Learning Perl as a First (programming) language by japhif

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    [choroba]: but undef %hash and %hash = () both work, too, but the first one keeps the memory allocated, while the latter makes it available for other parts of the program.
    [choroba]: iirc
    [perldigious]: karlgoethebier: Well it is a pretty old and complicated (for me) bit of code I wrote (poorly by my current standards), so I'm expecting everything to break when I add the scoping and find out what else is undesireably scope changed. :-)
    [perldigious]: Ah, thanks choroba, that sort of thing was precisely what I was wondering when I asked.
    [perldigious]: I didn't want to tie up memory unecessarily basically, I wanted to "delete" it specifically to free it up, and wasn't sure I was even accomplishing that.
    [stevieb]: perldigious You should start by writing some unit tests. That'll ensure current functionality doesn't break with changes.
    [choroba]: unit tests++

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