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A few questions I like to ask myself when deciding on the split between procedural and OO
  • how many classes am I likely to write - if it is < 3 perhaps procedural is better
  • are there obvious inheritance relationships - '... and this report is just like that one, except that it doesn't have a totals section' - if there are, OO seems a stronger approach
  • what are the odds of the original code needing several changes/additions in future - would small objects help make these changes easier to introduce
  • would an object acting out a pattern of behaviour make the code easier to use/develop - e.g. I like to model processing record-based files with an iterator like pattern
    while (defined (my $record = $file_object->next()) { # next creates a +record object from data in the file $records->process(); }
  • do I need flexibility in applying my objects ? Will this be easier/clearer in OO or procedural ? e.g.
    # OO $object->fold()->spindle()->mutilate(); #procedural my $rc = mutilate(spindle(fold($data)));
  • if you have the knowledge - are patterns (ala GoF) going to help - these well-known solutions generally seem better in OO contexts, but that is not always so
  • how many methods will these classes have - perhaps lots of single function objects would be better as a library of functions - unless these classes are overriding specific portions of a parent class (specialising their interface)

there are no hard-and-fast rules - except that the more experience and knowledge you have, the better your decisions will be. So, in the beginning, you can expect to make bad decisions - but as long as you view them as learning examples, then making them can be seen as encouraging.

In reply to Re: perl OO - to use or not to use by leriksen
in thread perl OO - to use or not to use by kiat

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