Beefy Boxes and Bandwidth Generously Provided by pair Networks
P is for Practical
 
PerlMonks  

Comment on

( #3333=superdoc: print w/replies, xml ) Need Help??
So what happens under Net::LDAP. Was "1000" was actually being treated as less than "500"?

No, not at all. The server just didn't knew how to actually _compare_ in this way. I did some research and found that, in fact, there is no predefined attributes in openldap that can be compared by 'less than' or 'greater than' comparators. You have to define your own attributes =)

As to difference in behaviour, ldapsearch untility shows similar results if you give it the right search filter - that is,

ldapsearch -h 192.168.9.111 -D "cn=root,dc=lomonosov,dc=parallel,dc=ru +" -w "rootpw" -b "ou=slurm,dc=lomonosov,dc=parallel,dc=ru" "(&(cn>=60 +0)(cn<=1000))"
i.e., it shows _nothing_ =)

In reply to Re^8: Net::LDAP q by fisher
in thread Net::LDAP q by fisher

Title:
Use:  <p> text here (a paragraph) </p>
and:  <code> code here </code>
to format your post; it's "PerlMonks-approved HTML":



  • Posts are HTML formatted. Put <p> </p> tags around your paragraphs. Put <code> </code> tags around your code and data!
  • Titles consisting of a single word are discouraged, and in most cases are disallowed outright.
  • Read Where should I post X? if you're not absolutely sure you're posting in the right place.
  • Please read these before you post! —
  • Posts may use any of the Perl Monks Approved HTML tags:
    a, abbr, b, big, blockquote, br, caption, center, col, colgroup, dd, del, div, dl, dt, em, font, h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6, hr, i, ins, li, ol, p, pre, readmore, small, span, spoiler, strike, strong, sub, sup, table, tbody, td, tfoot, th, thead, tr, tt, u, ul, wbr
  • You may need to use entities for some characters, as follows. (Exception: Within code tags, you can put the characters literally.)
            For:     Use:
    & &amp;
    < &lt;
    > &gt;
    [ &#91;
    ] &#93;
  • Link using PerlMonks shortcuts! What shortcuts can I use for linking?
  • See Writeup Formatting Tips and other pages linked from there for more info.
  • Log In?
    Username:
    Password:

    What's my password?
    Create A New User
    Chatterbox?
    [shmem]: ..the result from the pattern match
    [Lady_Aleena]: tobyink, I did after I failed to get the BLOCK to work. I can't seem to get my brain around grep BLOCK, though I'm okay with grep EXPR.
    [shmem]: so in the second example grep returns all true elements of the list passed
    [Lady_Aleena]: Okay, so grep BLOCK is not like map BLOCK where something might need to be returned at the end.
    [tobyink]: grep { $_ =~ /.*$in.*/; } @my_modules should work just fine. The problem is that you were adding on ;$_ at the end of the block. Why were you doing that?
    [Lady_Aleena]: tobyink, I was thinking map.
    [tobyink]: Something does need to be returned at the end not $_ though. You need to return (something that will be evaluated as) a boolean.
    [Lady_Aleena]: Here is a longish map I did in the same script. my @my_modules = map { my $file = $_; $file =~ s/$module_director y(.+)\.pm/$1/; $file =~ s/\//::/g; $file; } @files;
    [Lady_Aleena]: I spent half an hour trying to figure out why map was rewriting @files.
    [tobyink]: If you like map you can do map { ($_ =~ /.*$in.*/) ? $_ : () } @my_modules and it will work just the same. grep is neater though.

    How do I use this? | Other CB clients
    Other Users?
    Others perusing the Monastery: (9)
    As of 2017-05-27 07:44 GMT
    Sections?
    Information?
    Find Nodes?
    Leftovers?
      Voting Booth?