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"~" is used in the context of binary NOT, or pattern matching. Neither has anything to do with conditional pointer referencing

'-' is used in numeric subtraction; '>' is used in numeric greater than; both are used in numeric comparison <->.

Neither has anything to do with pointer dereferencing -> .... D'oh!

(You cannot break multi-character operators into bits to try and make sense of them!)

~> isn't just(*) the lazy option; it is also the logical option.

The subtlety of the difference in the operators reflecting well the subtlety of the difference in the operation (note:singular) they perform.

Ie. They both do the same thing -- dereference a pointer. The subtlety is that the new operator doesn't blow up if the variable it is applied to contains undef rather than a reference.

Most of the time when scan reading the code; that subtlety will be unimportant. And when the difference becomes important, the code following the new operator will need to deal with its consequences and that will be more than sufficient to demarcate its use.

*laziness -- the desire to not have to constantly type unnecessary boilerplate verbiage -- is a virtue in a programmer.

It is why Perl programmers infinitely prefer to type:

#! perl -slw use strict; print "What's your name? "; print 'Hello ' . <STDIN> . '!!!';

Rather than

import java.io.IOException; import java.io.InputStreamReader; public class HelloName { public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException { System.out.println("What's your name? "); // the BufferedReader is able to store some data for easier retrie +val BufferedReader bufferedReader = new BufferedReader( new InputStreamReader(System.in)); String name = bufferedReader.readLine(); System.out.println("Hello " + name +"!!!"); } }

I mean, honestly is it so good it needs to be said thrice? : BufferedReader bufferedReader = new BufferedReader(

Even the damn comment is grievously wrong!


With the rise and rise of 'Social' network sites: 'Computers are making people easier to use everyday'
Examine what is said, not who speaks -- Silence betokens consent -- Love the truth but pardon error.
"Science is about questioning the status quo. Questioning authority".
In the absence of evidence, opinion is indistinguishable from prejudice.

The start of some sanity?


In reply to Re^3: What operator should perl5porters use for safe dereferencing? by BrowserUk
in thread What operator should perl5porters use for safe dereferencing? by de-merphq

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