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!1's scratchpad

by !1 (Hermit)
on Jun 04, 2004 at 23:22 UTC ( #361260=scratchpad: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??

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#!/usr/bin/perl -l package TempOut; use overload '""' => 'as_string', fallback => 1; sub new { my $opt = shift; my $content = ''; open my $t, '>', \$content or die "Unable to open temp stdout: $!" +; my $orig = select $t; undef $\ if $opt; return bless [ $orig, \$content]; } sub DESTROY { my $self = shift; return unless $self->[0]; select $self->[0]; undef $self->[0]; $\ = $/; } *release = \&DESTROY; sub as_string { return ${shift->[1]}; } package main; use Win32::Clipboard; use IPC::Run 'run'; use File::Temp; use File::Spec::Functions 'rel2abs'; use Text::ParseWords 'shellwords'; use Data::Dumper; use B::Deparse; use strict; use vars '$c'; $/ = "\r\n"; my $v = shift; $v = $v && $v eq '-v' ? 1 : 0; $main::c = Win32::Clipboard->new(); my $last = ""; my $count = 0; my %macros; my %subs = ( reload => \&reload, list => \&list, def_macro => \&def_macro, rem_macro => \&rem_macro, exit => sub { $c->Set("Good bye ;-)");exit }, restart => \&restart, codefor => \&codefor, fullcodefor => \&fullcodefor, justrestart => sub { restart([1]) }, promote_macro => \&promote_macro ); my %commands; my %scripts; # find available commands in commands directory reload(); while ($c->WaitForChange) { next unless $c->IsText && $count++; my $t = $c->GetText or next; next if $t eq $last || $t !~ /^'?-+\s*([\w-]+)([ \t]+[^\r\n]+)?[\ +r\n]*(.*)$/s; $last = $t; my ($command,$params,$in) = ($1,$2,$3); # do this afterwards so we have our variables set before using the + regex engine again $command = lc $command; $params =~ s/^\s+//g; next unless exists $commands{$command}; if (ref $commands{$command}) { print "Executing macro $command"; eval { $commands{$command}->(parse($params),$in) }; print "Finished execution"; print $c->GetText if $v; next; } my $out; $c->Set('** EXECUTING **'); (my $stupid_win = $^X) =~ s/\\/\\\\/g; if ($v) { print qq{Executing: [$^X "$commands{$command}" $params]}; print "Parses as: ",Dumper(parse(qq["$stupid_win" "$commands{$ +command}" $params])); } eval { run(parse(qq["$stupid_win" "$commands{$command}" $params]), \$ +in, \$out); }; $out = "***** ERROR *****:\n$@" if $@; $out =~ s~(?<!\r)\n~$/~g; $c->Set($out); print $c->GetText if $v; $last = $out; } sub parse { my $line = shift ; $line =~ s{(\\[\w\s])}{\\$1}g ; return [ shellwords $line ]; } sub reload { undef %commands; for (<commands/*.pl>) { next unless -f; my ($check) = m!([\w-]+)\.pl$!g or next; $commands{lc $check} = rel2abs($_); $commands{lc $check} =~ s/\\/\\\\/g; } %scripts = %commands; %commands = (%commands,%subs,%macros); my $out = "Commands available: \r\n"; $out .= join "\r\n", map qq[ -- $_], sort keys %commands; print $out; $c->Set(($count ? "Reload successful!\r\n":'').$out); print Dumper(\%commands) if $v; } sub list { my $out = "Commands available: $/"; $out .= join $/, map qq[ -- $_], sort keys %commands; print $out; $c->Set($out); } sub def_macro { my ($args,$in) = @_; my ($name,$opt) = @$args; $c->Set("No body for the macro '$name' detected") unless $in; my $exec = eval { 'sub { my $temporary_out = TempOut->new("' . ($o +pt || '') . '"); local $_;local *ARGV;local $\\ = $/;local $/ = $/;lo +cal ${"} = ${"};local ${,} = ${,};{ my($XYZARGS,$INPUT) = @_;*_ = $XY +ZARGS;*ARGV = \\@_;open ARGV, \'<\', \\$INPUT or die "Wrapper failed" +; };' . $in . '; close ARGV; $main::c->Set($temporary_out->as_string) +; }' } or warn "Error! $@" and return; my $sub = eval { eval $exec or die $@ } or $c->Set("Error creating + macro '$name': $@") and print "Body: $/$exec" and return; $macros{lc $name} = $commands{lc $name} = $sub; local $, = $/; print "Built code as: ",B::Deparse->new->coderef2text($sub),"Macro + $name successfully created", if $v; $c->Set("Macro $name successfully created"); } sub rem_macro { my ($args,$in) = @_; my ($name) = @$args; $c->Set("Macro $name not found") and return unless exists $command +s{$name}; delete $commands{lc $name}; delete $macros{lc $name}; $c->Set("Macro $name successfully removed"); } sub restart { my $args = shift; $c->Set("You will lose all macros. Please pass 1 as the first para +meter if you wish to continue.") and return unless @$args && $args->[ +0] eq "1"; $c->Set("** RESTARTING **"); print "$/$/Please stay tuned for the following messages.$/$/****** + RESTARTING ******$/"; undef $c; exec("$^X $0"); } sub codefor { my $args = lc shift->[0]; my $out; if (exists $macros{$args} && ref $macros{$args}) { my @x = map { s/^ {4}//;$_ } split m!\n!,B::Deparse->new->code +ref2text($macros{$args}); $out = join($/, " -- def_macro $args", @x[15..($#x - 3)],"","# + End of macro"); } else { $out = "$args is not a macro" } $c->Set($out); } sub fullcodefor { my $args = lc shift->[0]; my $out; if (exists $macros{$args}) { $out = join $/, split m!\n!,B::Deparse->new->coderef2text($mac +ros{$args}); } else { $out = "$args is not a macro" } $c->Set($out); } sub promote_macro { my $args = lc shift->[0]; my $out; if (! exists $macros{$args}) { $out = "Macro $args doesn't exist"; } else { $out = eval { my @x = map { s/^ {4}//;$_ } split m!\n!,B::Deparse->new-> +coderef2text($macros{$args}); mkdir "commands" unless -d "commands"; open my $f, '>', rel2abs("commands/$args.pl") or die $@; print $f $_ for "#!/usr/bin/perl -l","",@x[15..($#x - 3)]; close $f or die $@; delete $macros{$args}; $commands{$args} = $scripts{$args} = rel2abs("commands/$ar +gs.pl"); "Macro $args successfully promoted!"; } || "Error promoting macro $args: $@"; } $c->Set($out); } __END__

#!/usr/bin/perl -l package Tom; sub out { print "Reached out"; } package main; use Safe; my $t = Safe->new->reval('bless {},"Tom"'); print $t; print $t->out; __END__ Tom=HASH(0x18d0b48) Can't locate object method "out" via package "Tom" at safetest.pl line + 17.

Perl solutions to The Python Challenge

  1. perl -le'print 2**38'
  2. perl -le'$_="@ARGV";tr/a-z/c-zab/;print' "text"
  3. perl -pe's/[\W_]//g' file
  4. perl -ne'print $1 while /(?<![A-Z])[A-Z]{3}([a-z])[A-Z]{3}(?![A-Z])/g' + file
  5. Call with: perl script.pl 12345

    #!/usr/bin/perl -wl use LWP::Simple; $_ = shift; while ($_) { $_ = get "http://www.pythonchallenge.com/pc/def/linkedlist.php?noth +ing=$_"; print; ($_)= /(\d+)$/g }
  6. Python has a library called pickle. This part sucks because you actually have to use python. Download banner.p and create script.py with this:

    import pickle print pickle.load(open('banner.p','r'))

    Run with...

    python script.py | perl -e'$_=eval <STDIN>;for (@$_) { while(($a,$b )=splice(@$_,0,2)) {print $a x $b}print $/}'

    You may want to redirect the output to a file since it's wider than 70 characters.

  7. Download channel.zip and run the following.

    #!/usr/bin/perl -wl use Archive::Zip; my $z = Archive::Zip->new("channel.zip"); my $seed = shift; my $comment = ""; while ($seed) { my $mem = $z->memberNamed("$seed.txt"); $comment .= $mem->fileComment(); ($seed) = $mem->contents =~ /(\d+)$/g; } print $comment

    The problem that follows should be simple (*hint* look at what the letters are made of).

  8. Download oxygen.png and run this in the same directory.

    #!/usr/bin/perl -w use GD; my $i = GD::Image->newFromPng("oxygen.png",1); for (my $x=0;(($r,$g,$b)=$i->rgb($i->getPixel($x,47))) && $r == $g && +$g == $b; $x+=7) { print chr($r) } print $/;

    then

    perl -le'print map chr, @ARGV' numbers
  9. This one's fairly simple. "BZh91AY" marks the beginning of a bzip2 file. To get the appropriate content, just quote the text and pipe it to a file. Please note that the password has $| in it and you must escape accordingly.

  10. #!/usr/bin/perl use GD::Simple; my $i = GD::Simple->new(640,480); $i->bgcolor('white'); $i->fgcolor('black'); my @a = ( ... first values ... ); my @b = ( ... second values ... ); for (\@a,\@b) { while (@$_) { my @x = splice @$_,0,2; next unless @$_; $i->moveTo(@x); $i->lineTo(@{$_}[0,1]); } } open $x, ">","out.jpg"; binmode $x; print $x $i->jpeg(); close $x;
  11. perl -le'$_=1; s/((.)\2*)/length($1).$2/ge while $a++ < 30; print leng +th $_'
  12. Download cave.jpg and run this in the same directory.

    #!/usr/bin/perl use GD; my $i = GD::Image->newFromJpeg("cave.jpg",1); my $b = $i->colorAllocate(255,255,255); for my $x (0..639) { for my $y (0..479) { $i->setPixel($x,$y,$b) if ($y % 2 ? $x+1:$x) % 2 } } open $x, ">", "out2.jpg"; binmode $x; print $x $i->jpeg(); close $x;
  13. Download evil2.gfx and run this code on it for values 0 through 4. The output files are jpg, png, gif, png, and jpg, respectively so set the type accordingly.

    perl -ne'BEGIN{undef$/;$a=shift;@ARGV=q[evil2.gfx];binmode(STDOUT)}for +(;defined($x=substr($_,$a,1));$a+=5){print$x}' number > out.type

    Special thanks to Animator for the number hint on this one.

  14. In the previous one, if you try to get evilx.jpg where x is in (1..4), you'd notice that the last file is corrupt. Looking at the actual data of evil4.jpg, you will find "Bert is evil! go back!." In this problem, you're asked to phone the evil. This, of course, is Bert.

    perl -MRPC::XML::Client -le'print RPC::XML::Client->new(q[http://www.p +ythonchallenge.com/pc/phonebook.php])->send_request(qw[phone Bert])-> +value'
  15. If you look in the source you will see a comment that 100 * 100 = (100+99+99+98) + (... In other words: 100 * 100 = 100 + 2 * summation(1..99). The picture is of a cinammon roll or something. When you download wire.png, you'll notice that it's actually 1 pixel by 10000 pixels. Going back to our 100*100 problem, we need to create an image that is 100x100 but taking lengths of x. The first row takes the first 100 pixels, the right outer column takes the next 99 pixels, the bottom row takes the reverse of the next 99 pixels, the left column, with both the top pixel and bottom pixels already taken, takes the reverse of the next 98 pixels and so on.

    #!/usr/bin/perl use GD; $i = GD::Image->newFromPng("wire.png",1); $n = GD::Image->newTrueColor(100,100); my ($x,$y) = (-1,0); my @go = ([1,0],[0,1],[-1,0],[0,-1]); my $c = 0; my $direct = 0; for ( map { $_ % 100 != 0 ? ($_) x 2 : $_ } reverse 0..100 ) { for (1..$_) { $x += $go[$direct][0]; $y += $go[$direct][1]; $n->setPixel($x,$y, $n->colorAllocate($i->rgb($i->getPixel($c, +0)))); $c++ } $direct++; $direct %= 4; } open $w, ">", "out3.jpg"; binmode $w; print $w $n->jpeg(100); close $w;
  16. perl -MDateTime -le'print for grep { $a=DateTime->new(year=>$_,month=> +1,day=>26);$a->day_of_week == 1 and $a->is_leap_year } map { sprintf +q[1%02d6], reverse 0..99 }'

    Note the hints from the source. This is someone's birthday.


I decided I don't like writing sql that much. However, I *really* don't like Class::DBI. I know, it's so easy and blah blah. Whatever. Creation and updating aren't really very interesting. I'm more interested in querying the tables in an easier way. Because of this, I've come up with what I've tentatively called DBIx::Sets.

What makes this so great? I'm glad you asked. In DBIx::Sets, the tables know how to link to other tables. For instance, suppose you have tables that look similar to:

Table Items: itemid | name -------+-------- 1 | Teddies 2 | Bobsleds 3 | Pogo sticks 4 | Trampolines Table ShoppingCart: cartid | name_on_cart -------+-------------- 1 | Bob Smith 2 | Jane Dover 3 | Will Simpson Table ShoppingCartItems: cartitemid | cartid | itemid -----------+--------+--------- 1 | 1 | 2 2 | 3 | 4 3 | 2 | 1 4 | 2 | 4 Foreign key cartid -> ShoppingCart.cartid Foreign key itemid -> Items.itemid

Suppose we wanted the names of everyone who has ordered Teddies or Trampolines.

my $iter = ( DBSchema::ShoppingCart->only_fields("name_on_cart") + DBSchema::Items->where(name => [ qw(Teddies Trampolines) ] )->execute;

This would produce and execute the sql:

SELECT ShoppingCart.name_on_cart from ShoppingCart where ShoppingCart. +cartid IN (SELECT ShoppingCartItems.cartid from ShoppingCartItems inn +er join Items on ShoppingCartItems.itemid = Items.itemid where Items. +name in ('Teddies','Trampolines'))

(Yes, I do use placeholders before the execute)You might be thinking to yourself, "Well? Who cares? Why not just use the sql? It's the same thing and a bit clearer." My response is: yeah, I know. I'm just exploring another direction to take besides OO-mappers. It's not that I don't like SQL. It's just that sometimes my clients have specific database needs and not all databases have the same features or accept the same line of SQL. For instance, suppose we wanted all shopping carts that only had Teddies and Trampolines and nothing else. Here's the solution with my markup:

my $iter = ( DBSchema::ShoppingCart->only_fields("name_on_cart") + DBSchema::Items->where(name => "Teddies") + DBSchema::Items->where(name => "Trampolines") - DBSchema::Items->where(name => ["!=", [ qw(Teddies Trampolines) ] +] ) )->execute();

This produces the following sql when targeting PostgreSQL:

SELECT ShoppingCart.name_on_cart from ShoppingCart where ShoppingCart. +cartid IN (SELECT ShoppingCartItems.cartid from ShoppingCartItems inn +er join Items on ShoppingCartItems.itemid=Items.itemid where Items.na +me = 'Teddies') AND ShoppingCart.cartid IN (SELECT ShoppingCartItems. +cartid from ShoppingCartItems inner join Items on ShoppingCartItems.i +temid=Items.itemid where Items.name = 'Trampolines') AND ShoppingCart +.cartid NOT IN (SELECT ShoppingCartItems.cartid from ShoppingCartItem +s inner join Items on ShoppingCartItems.itemid=Items.itemid where Ite +ms.name NOT IN ('Teddies','Trampolines'))

As you can see, the markup one is a bit clearer. (You may be wondering how in the world != turned into NOT IN. It's a workaround for single vs multiple comparisons. If it's a single comparison, it generates SQL with column=field. If it's multiple, it switches over to IN.)

The following is produced when you try to hit MySQL 3.23.x:

SELECT DISTINCT ShoppingCartItems.cartid from ShoppingCartItems inner +join Items on ShoppingCartItems.itemid=Items.itemid where Items.name= +'Teddies'; - collects results - SELECT DISTINCT ShoppingCartItems.cartid from ShoppingCartItems inner +join Items on ShoppingCartItems.itemid=Items.itemid where Items.name= +'Trampolines'; - collects results - SELECT DISTINCT ShoppingCartItems.cartid from ShoppingCartItems inner +join Items on ShoppingCartItems.itemid=Items.itemid where Items.name +NOT IN ('Teddies','Trampolines'); - collects results, calculates the intersection from first two and the +n the difference of the intersection and the third query - SELECT ShoppingCart.name_on_cart from ShoppingCart where ShoppingCart. +cartid=2;

As you can see, using a version of MySQL from before the addition of subqueries can really screw you in terms of performance. However, the results *are* the same. I know I can optimize this down to three queries but right now I'm mostly interested in getting this stuff to work. I'd rather it be slow than incorrect.


This was fun.

package Attribute::Scary; use Attribute::Handlers; our %lookup; sub import { # put $self into the calling package my $caller = caller() . "::self"; *{$caller} = \$$caller; # well this is somewhat pointless $caller = caller(); *{"$caller\::spacey 0"} = sub { "Bob" }; *{"$caller\::spacey 1"} = sub { "Hello, Bob!\n" }; } sub UNIVERSAL::Method :ATTR(CODE) { my ($package, $symbol, $referent) = @_; my $name = "$package\::" . *{$symbol}{NAME}; $lookup{$name} = $referent; eval " no warnings 'redefine'; *$name = sub { package $package; local \$self = shift; &{\$Attribute::Scary::lookup{'$name'}}; } "; } 1;

#!/usr/bin/perl -l BEGIN { $INC{"b.pm"}=$0 } package b; use attributes; use Devel::Peek; our $last; sub MODIFY_CODE_ATTRIBUTES { if ($last) { print "$/-- LAST CODEREF -----"; Dump($last); print "---------------------"; } $last = $_[1]; print "$/-- Current is $_[1]"; Dump($_[1]); } package a; use base "b"; sub x :att {} sub y :att {} __END__ -- Current is CODE(0x8145670) SV = RV(0x813f850) at 0x813f2e8 REFCNT = 1 FLAGS = (PADBUSY,PADMY,ROK) RV = 0x8145670 SV = PVCV(0x812d950) at 0x8145670 REFCNT = 5 FLAGS = () IV = 0 NV = 0 COMP_STASH = 0x0 ROOT = 0x0 XSUB = 0x0 XSUBANY = 0 GVGV::GV = 0x0 FILE = "(null)" DEPTH = 0 FLAGS = 0x0 PADLIST = 0x812d790 OUTSIDE = 0x811b2ac (MAIN) -- LAST CODEREF ----- SV = RV(0x813f854) at 0x8126a7c REFCNT = 1 FLAGS = (ROK) RV = 0x8145670 SV = PVCV(0x812d950) at 0x8145670 REFCNT = 2 FLAGS = () IV = 0 NV = 0 COMP_STASH = 0x812d6b8 "a" START = 0x8130040 ===> 3717 ROOT = 0x81478c0 XSUB = 0x0 XSUBANY = 0 GVGV::GV = 0x812d7d8 "a" :: "x" FILE = "-" DEPTH = 0 FLAGS = 0x0 PADLIST = 0x812d790 OUTSIDE = 0x811b2ac (MAIN) --------------------- -- Current is CODE(0x8148024) SV = RV(0x813f850) at 0x813f2e8 REFCNT = 1 FLAGS = (PADBUSY,PADMY,ROK) RV = 0x8148024 SV = PVCV(0x8167a4c) at 0x8148024 REFCNT = 5 FLAGS = () IV = 0 NV = 0 COMP_STASH = 0x0 ROOT = 0x0 XSUB = 0x0 XSUBANY = 0 GVGV::GV = 0x0 FILE = "(null)" DEPTH = 0 FLAGS = 0x0 PADLIST = 0x816724c OUTSIDE = 0x811b2ac (MAIN)

Perhaps a bit more concise?

sub randChar { my ($chars,$len,$inc,$exl) = split /-/, shift; $chars ||= "1"; $len ||= 1; my %map; my $temp = 0; undef @map{ "bob", map { $temp++; $chars =~ /$temp/ ? @$_ : () } [0..9], ["a".."z"], ["A".."Z"], [map chr,34..47,58..64,92..96,123..126] }; undef @map{ "bob", map { /^\d+$/ && $_ < 127 ? chr : () } split/\|/, $inc + || "" }; delete @map{ "bob", map { /^\d+$/ && $_ < 127 ? chr : () } split /\|/, $ex +l || "" }; my @map = keys %map or return; join "",map $map[rand @map],1..$len }

You might be wondering why the string "bob" appears in the declarations. The reason is in case any of the maps returns an empty list. If the list is empty, the program will die.




I'm trying to create an object store of sorts. Is this a naive approach or...?
use Scalar::Util "weaken"; use vars qw(%STORE); sub new { my ($class,$key) = @_; return $STORE{$key} if exists $STORE{$key} && defined $STORE{$key}; my $obj = $class->retrieve($key); weaken $obj; $STORE{$key} = $obj; return $obj; } ...



I happen to like HTML::Template's separation between logic and presentation. However, sometimes it makes you go crazy because it's difficult to extend and filters are slow. I think if a few new features were added to HTML::Template, a number of problems would disappear. The difficulty is in maintaining the speed that HTML::Template is known for. Our HTML::Template project feature list:

  1. Introduction of pads. This allows for templates to share variables rather easily without the need for an HTML::Template object to construct a complete parse tree for the joined templates.
  2. New parser. It will take TMPL_(\w+), upcase the captured part and search for a class by that name. The rest of the tag is split and passed to the constructor for the class. For instance <TMPL_BOB name="whatever"> would be converted into HTML::Template::Classes::BOB->new(name=>"whatever"). Any lone words would be returned as word=>1. The parser will look for a / at the end of the tag or $HTML::Template::Classes::BOB::atomic set to a true value. If it finds either, it will not look for a closing tag. If neither are present, the parser will return the text enclosed between the opening and closing tags as the _inner parameter to new. Furthermore, the parameter _value will be passed as well which will contain a reference to a scalar. This scalar will need to be dereferenced twice in order to obtain the value that is passed via param to the HTML::Template object. This is due to the pads in the first section. If you have $HTML::Template::Classes::BOB::require_objects set to true, an _objects parameter will be passed that points to the object map that HTML::Template uses. This is an object path that is searched.
  3. Each of the classes can inherit from HTML::Template::Classes::Base. This class has a new, deparse and output method. Also, its import will set $HTML::Template::Classes::YOUR_CLASS::atomic to 0 if it isn't already defined.
  4. There's a new class called HTML::Template::Dev. It adds a deparse method which will allow you to retrieve a parsable version of the template. The class also adds a number of methods that allow you to manipulate the parsed objects prior to deparsing. You can also add or remove objects from the execution path. This should make implementing an HTML::Template editor very easy to do (although we haven't done it yet) as well as massive editing of defaults for different templates.

Most of this is in a very rough state right now. Another drawback is that it slows down our beloved HTML::Template in large templates. The default VAR, LOOP, IF, and INCLUDE classes are pretty much the same speed.


Imports $_string, $_match, $_prematch and $_postmatch. Just trying to make a better interface for this for davido

$_string is the string which you wish to match against. It is not updated if you change the variable you set it to. If you wish to match against a particular variable that may be changing, you can use MatchVars->string($var);. In other words:

my $var = 1; $_string = $var; $var = 2; print $_string; # prints 1 $var = 1; MatchVars->string($var); $var = 2; print $_string; # prints 2

$_match is the equivalent of $&, $_prematch is the equivalent of $`, and $_postmatch is the equivalent of $'. As a small note, I did a couple of tests and found that s/// doesn't affect @-, @+, $`, $&, or $'. Perhaps I messed up. It's 4AM. Oh well. I hope you can use this as a basis for a module of some sort.

package MatchVars; use vars qw($string $match $prematch $postmatch $_internal $_init); $_internal = ""; $_init = 0; sub string { shift if ref($_[0]) eq "MatchVars" || (@_ > 1 && $_[0] eq "MatchVars +"); return $_internal unless @_; $_internal = \ $_[0] } sub import { no strict; my $caller = caller(); unless ($_init) { tie $string, "MatchVars::string", \$_internal; tie $match, "MatchVars::Match", \$_internal; tie $prematch, "MatchVars::Prematch", \$_internal; tie $postmatch, "MatchVars::Postmatch", \$_internal; $_init = 1; } *{"$caller\::_string"} = \$string; *{"$caller\::_match"} = \$match; *{"$caller\::_prematch"} = \$prematch; *{"$caller\::_postmatch"} = \$postmatch; } package MatchVars::string; sub TIESCALAR { my ( $class, $r_string ) = @_; bless \do{my $o = $r_string},$class; } sub STORE { my $self = shift; $$$self = \ $_[0]; } sub FETCH { my $self = shift; return $$$$self; } sub UNTIE { } sub DESTROY { } package MatchVars::base; sub TIESCALAR { my ( $class, $r_string ) = @_; bless \do{my $o = $r_string},$class; } sub STORE { } sub UNTIE { } sub DESTROY { } package MatchVars::Match; use base "MatchVars::base"; sub FETCH { my $self = shift; no warnings; my $return = substr($$$$self, $-[0], $+[0] - $-[0] ); return defined $return?$return:""; } package MatchVars::Prematch; use base "MatchVars::base"; sub FETCH { my $self = shift; no warnings; my $return = substr($$$$self,0, $-[0] ); return defined $return?$return:""; } package MatchVars::Postmatch; use base "MatchVars::base"; sub FETCH { my $self = shift; no warnings; my $return = substr($$$$self, $+[0]); return defined $return?$return:""; } 1; # END OF MatchVars.pm __END__ #!/usr/bin/perl -wl use strict; use MatchVars; # Let's try it out my $var1 = "pre=match=post"; $_string = $var1; print "1: $_prematch | $_match | $_postmatch" if $var1 =~ /=\w+=/; # 1: pre | =match= | post # But this doesn't work properly if you change $var my $var2 = "pre=match=post"; $_string = $var2; $var2 = "this=is_not=right"; print "2: $_prematch | $_match | $_postmatch" if $var2 =~ /=\w+=/; # 2: pre= | match=po | st # But this is a workaround my $var3 = "pre=match=post"; MatchVars->string($var3); $var3 = "this=shows=up"; print "3: $_prematch | $_match | $_postmatch" if $var3 =~ /=\w+=/; # this | =shows= | up
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