in reply to Re^2: Perl 6 is going to get a lot faster in 2013
in thread Perl 6 is going to get a lot faster in 2013

For example, Larry Wall declaring speed to be the #1 blocker of adoption in November.

A lot of people have declared a lot of things over the lifetime of the project. Most of them haven't happened. I will believe them when I see them.

... if NQP gets faster, Rakudo Perl 6 gets faster.

That's nonsense. Features aren't free. Parrot has at various times beaten a lot of languages and implementations on various microbenchmarks, and Rakudo and even NQP didn't.


Comment on Re^3: Perl 6 is going to get a lot faster in 2013
Re^4: Perl 6 is going to get a lot faster in 2013
by Anonymous Monk on Feb 04, 2013 at 13:16 UTC
    Parrot has at various times beaten a lot of languages and implementations on various microbenchmarks

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think that has been the case for a long time (ie since the removal of the JIT in 2009(?)), and never for any language except PIR.

    Rakudo/JVM might or might not work out, but as far as I can tell we already know that Rakudo/Parrot has not.

    -- gerdr

      As I recall, these were microbenchmarks without the JIT in 2010 and 2011. I don't have that code anymore, so I'm going by memory. They were definitely hand-written PIR code, though.

      If what I recall is true, then you can draw two conclusions. First, performance on a microbenchmark represents little more than performance on a microbenchmark. Second, features aren't free.

Re^4: Perl 6 is going to get a lot faster in 2013
by raiph (Friar) on Feb 04, 2013 at 19:32 UTC
    Fwiw I posted this meditation and these responses mostly for those who might enjoy:

    • core hacking that's vastly simpler and more likely to be accepted than Perl 5 core hacking

    • using Perl 6 when it's a lot faster

    (This may well not include chromatic.)

    For example, Larry Wall declaring speed to be the #1 blocker of adoption in November.
    A lot of people have declared a lot of things over the lifetime of the project. Most of them haven't happened. I will believe them when I see them.

    Larry Wall isn't just a random person and he wasn't declaring that anything has happened. He's the leader of the Perl 6 project, he focused attention, and #perl6 folk listened. (Another example: Moritz forgot to mention he added sink (void) processing in late December, something that had been on the todo list for many years and which makes most code in void context a lot faster.)