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Re^3: selecting columns from a tab-separated-values file

by Lotus1 (Chaplain)
on Jan 24, 2013 at 16:47 UTC ( #1015199=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Re^2: selecting columns from a tab-separated-values file
in thread selecting columns from a tab-separated-values file

It turns out that BrowserUK's approach was an order of magnitude quicker than the other approaches presented here. I took the liberty of coding up Sundialsvc4's suggestion of buffering a few hundred thousand lines worth of data before printing them out to a file. I used array refs since there was no reason to use hash refs.

I used a Powershell script to time the different approaches.

echo 'BrowserUK 1024' > bench.txt Measure-Command { .\buk.bat } >> bench.txt echo 'BrowserUK 2048' >> bench.txt Measure-Command { .\buk2048.bat } >> bench.txt echo 'Sundial approach by Lotus1' >> bench.txt Measure-Command { perl sundial.pl test.csv > dialout.csv} >> bench.txt echo spacebar >> bench.txt Measure-Command { .\sed -n "s/^\([^\t]*\t\)[^\t]*\t\([^\t]*\t\)[^\t]*\ +t[^\t]*\t\([^\t]*\)\t.*/\2\1\3/p" test.csv > spaceout.csv} >> bench.t +xt echo 'kenosis/choroba' >> bench.txt Measure-Command { perl kc.pl test.csv > kcout.csv} >> bench.txt echo 'mildside -- wrong order but testing anyway' >> bench.txt Measure-Command { .\cut '-f1,3,6' test.csv > cutout.csv} >> bench.txt

Here are the results using a 1Gb test file on an idle server with 16 cores and 8Gb RAM: update: (Windows Server 2008 R2)

BrowserUK 1024 Minutes : 1 Seconds : 54 Milliseconds : 103 Ticks : 1141033211 BrowserUK 2048 Minutes : 1 Seconds : 55 Milliseconds : 124 Ticks : 1151241665 Sundial approach by Lotus1 Minutes : 21 Seconds : 53 Milliseconds : 28 Ticks : 13130283183 spacebar Minutes : 21 Seconds : 24 Milliseconds : 215 Ticks : 12842154788 kenosis/choroba Minutes : 22 Seconds : 4 Milliseconds : 865 Ticks : 13248658887 mildside -- wrong order but testing anyway Minutes : 22 Seconds : 19 Milliseconds : 295 Ticks : 13392954883

Here is the sundialsvc4 approach that I put together for the test:

#! perl -sw use strict; my $count = 0; my @lines; while( <> ) { $count++; my @f = ( split /\t/, $_, 7 )[ 0, 2, 5 ]; push @lines, \@f; if( $count >= 300000 ) { #size of buffer $count = 0; print_buffer( \@lines ); } } print_buffer( \@lines ); sub print_buffer { my ($aref) = @_; foreach (@$aref) { print join( "\t", @$_ ) . "\n"; } splice( @$aref ); }

Here is the Kenosis/choroba approach.

#! perl -sw use strict; #kenosis/choroba approach while( <> ) { print join( "\t", ( split /\t/, $_, 7 )[ 0, 2, 5 ]), "\n"; }


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Re^4: selecting columns from a tab-separated-values file
by mildside (Friar) on Jan 24, 2013 at 22:59 UTC

    Great job there Lotus1.

    I'm curious about the use of splice to clear the array in your code, as below:

        splice( @$aref );

    I would probably have used the below:

        @$aref = ();

    Is splice faster or better in some other way?

      Thanks. I started with assigning the empty array but I had a bug somewhere so I stuck the splice in and got it working. I think I forgot the '@' in the first try but put it in with splice. I don't know which is faster but it is only called a handful of times in this approach anyway.

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