Beefy Boxes and Bandwidth Generously Provided by pair Networks
We don't bite newbies here... much
 
PerlMonks  

How I usually read my mail:

by Petruchio (Vicar)
on Nov 08, 2004 at 06:37 UTC ( #405984=poll: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??

vote on How I usually read my mail:

Mutt
[bar] 105/15%
VM
[bar] 3/0%
Gnus
[bar] 3/0%
Thunderbird
[bar] 114/16%
Outlook
[bar] 73/10%
Outlook Express
[bar] 23/3%
Lotus Notes
[bar] 7/1%
Eudora
[bar] 12/2%
Pine
[bar] 54/8%
Elm
[bar] 1/0%
Evolution
[bar] 52/7%
Balsa
[bar] 1/0%
KMail
[bar] 32/4%
Pegasus
[bar] 9/1%
Opera Mail
[bar] 9/1%
OS X's 'Mail'
[bar] 47/7%
AOL Communicator
[bar] 2/0%
Web Interface
[bar] 79/11%
mailx
[bar] 5/1%
less $MAIL
[bar] 4/1%
My favorite client isn't listed!
[bar] 55/8%
Open envelope, unfold letter
[bar] 6/1%
What mail? Nobody loves me.
[bar] 23/3%
719 total votes
Comment on How I usually read my mail:
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by FoxtrotUniform (Prior) on Nov 08, 2004 at 06:41 UTC

    For the true net.studs among us, telnet mail.server.tld:25 should be listed.

    That was a pretty stupid thing to write.

    --
    Yours in pedantry,
    F o x t r o t U n i f o r m

    "Anything you put in comments is not tested and easily goes out of date." -- tye

      True FoxtrotUniform,
      but what about telnet mail.server 110??

      i'v done that a more than a few times to get around (very) tight "security" at my school before.....
        Given choice I prefer talking to IMAP via telnet. It's a horrible protocol to implement, but it's fun to talk to...
        -nuffin
        zz zZ Z Z #!perl
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by castaway (Parson) on Nov 08, 2004 at 09:28 UTC
    I picked 'Opera mail' but really I needed to pick 'Pine' too, since it all depends on where I happen to be.. Pine remotely (via ssh), Opera locally (usually).

    C.

      I used to use pine several years ago, but use a web interface now. Your mention of pine was a bit nostalgic - I don't use it too much any more.
        Oh, I much prefer pine. I've been using it for ... oh, I guess it was 10 years in August! Web mail can be nifty, but private webmail servers are usually too poky for my tastes, and public webservers are too unreliable (just tried logging in to my gmail account ... service down!) They can take my pine. They'll just have to pry it from my cold, dead fingers. ;->
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by DrHyde (Prior) on Nov 08, 2004 at 09:47 UTC
    I see that mutt and Thunderbird are tied at the moment. That's good, cos I use them both equally. Through the AWESOME POWER of IMAP they can both work on the same mailboxes without arguing about which flags are set on which messages. IMAP rocks.
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by gaal (Parson) on Nov 08, 2004 at 11:50 UTC
    Hmmm, SpamAssassin isn't listed. It reads (and keeps) most of the mail I get.
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by NodeReaper (Curate) on Nov 08, 2004 at 11:50 UTC
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by Paulster2 (Priest) on Nov 08, 2004 at 15:01 UTC

    Gee, I selected Outlook Express, after all, doesn't MicroLimp own everything?

    Paulster2


    You're so sly, but so am I. - Quote from the movie Manhunter.
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by kutsu (Priest) on Nov 08, 2004 at 15:56 UTC

    I had to vote "What mail? Nobody loves me" cause I get very little mail (and nobody loves me ;). However, I regularly forward certain logs through pine, and read them with pine, so pine is what I usually use (though I wouldn't call that "mail").

    "Cogito cogito ergo cogito sum - I think that I think, therefore I think that I am." Ambrose Bierce

Re: How I usually read my mail:
by Mutant (Priest) on Nov 08, 2004 at 15:57 UTC
    I begrudgingly use Outlook, since work uses Exchange extensively. I haven't had a chance to try the Evolution / Exchange connector thingy...
      I use Evolution with Connector to talk with our corporate exchange server all the time. Works great... I find it much better than Outlook, especially in filtering messages. There are a few things that don't work so well (like shared folders).

      I use lookoutoutlook at work but I wouldn't count that as my mail. My private mail is thunderbird now but untill recently Kmail.

      Cheers,
      R.

A recent change in mailreaders
by radiantmatrix (Parson) on Nov 08, 2004 at 17:54 UTC

    Funny this should come up now: I just recently moved away from Mutt to Thunderbird. My online university technically requires OE, but I've had no troubles using TB instead -- the only reason Mutt didn't work is that HTML-mail is required by the University.

    I have this strange compunction to read all my mail with the same app, so I've moved over to TB entirely. Long live IMAP for making that painless!

    radiantmatrix
    require General::Disclaimer;
    "Users are evil. All users are evil. Do not trust them. Perl specifically offers the -T switch because it knows users are evil." - japhy
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by b10m (Vicar) on Nov 08, 2004 at 19:14 UTC

    Wow, I'm amazed by the outcome of this poll (up till now). I figured the MS Outlook-family apps wouldn't be top listed (after all, we have a lot of *NIX freaks around here), but because of that, I'd say pine/elm/mutt would be on the top. But no, currently Thunderbird is ranked highest. I thought most of the monks over here would at least love an app that would allow them to use $EDITOR1 for composing mails...

    I recently switched from PINE (still love it) to mutt (getting to love it more and more) ... for what it's worth ...

    --
    b10m

    1Please, please, no holy wars again!
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by Theo (Priest) on Nov 08, 2004 at 19:49 UTC
    What?!?!? No native Mozilla mail handler?

    -Theo-
    (so many nodes and so little time ... )

Re: How I usually read my mail:
by perlcapt (Pilgrim) on Nov 08, 2004 at 20:30 UTC
    SquirrelMail. Yes, I know, it's written in PHP. I installed it on our outside server at work so that we could read our mail when we are travelling. It has servered us well for three years now. I run it as a https site so that there is some protection for the IMAP login.

    I have written a web-mail client in Perl, but this is far better (plus I don't have to do the support).

    perlcapt
    -ben
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by Anonymous Monk on Nov 09, 2004 at 02:26 UTC
    In decreasing order of preference: mutt, mailx?, pine, a web interface, less $MAIL. OTOH, mutt w/o personal key bindings, and possibly w/o some patches, is just like pine for me.
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by mce (Curate) on Nov 09, 2004 at 16:14 UTC
    Hi,
    I am running the netscape mail client for a few years now, and it still does the trick.

    Cheers,


    ---------------------------
    Dr. Mark Ceulemans
    Senior Consultant
    BMC, Belgium
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by doran (Deacon) on Nov 09, 2004 at 23:55 UTC
    I've used Pegasus on Windows boxen for many years and prefer it to anything else I've tried. We're strict about it's use (over Outbreak Express), and that alone has saved our company untold thousands of dollars.

    On *nix it's usually Pine from the terminal (except for those quick 'mail' interludes).
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by Errto (Vicar) on Nov 10, 2004 at 02:28 UTC

    I recently replaced Evolution with Thunderbird as my main mail client, and I'm quite happy. I admire Evolution's design but it reminded me too much of Outlook. I use Outlook at work. I hate Outlook, with a passion. Most recently discovered Outlook gem: when you start Outlook, if you have any Inbox rules enabled, it begins applying them immediately, without so much as a dialog box to indicate this. It locks up while doing so and will not relinquish control until it's done, no matter what. If one of the rules doesn't work for some reason (say you accidentally deleted the mailbox it delivers to), it continues processing the rule on every message and only at the end informs you with an extremely unhelpful error message. I hate Outlook.

    In addition to Thunderbird, I also use IMP and pine, depending on whether I'm at my own desktop, a web browser, or a terminal. IMAP is a beautiful thing (as pointed out above by DrHyde. I use fetchmail for retrieval, good old-fashioned procmail for filtering, and dovecot for IMAP.

      Yeah, Outlook is a pain. When I got back from my vacation this summer and started Outlook, I thought it had hanged since it wasn't responding. So I brought up KMail, and it started downloading a big bunch of mails (I used to get a lot of status mails from cron jobs).

      It turned out Outlook was doing the same thing, but for some reason it couldn't imagine I would be interested in knowing what was going on.

          I recently replaced Evolution with Thunderbird as my main mail client,

      AFAICT there is one problem with Thunderbird: no PGP/GnuPG support. I prefer to sign all my emails with GnuPG when I send them in this day and age of "Joe Jobs" and such...

        I don't want to take you away from `mutt`, but there is gpg support for Thunderbird. It's called enigmail:

        "Enigmail is an extension to the mail client of Mozilla / Netscape and Thunderbird which allows users to access the authentication and encryption features provided by the popular GnuPG software"
        --
        b10m

        All code is usually tested, but rarely trusted.
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by zakzebrowski (Curate) on Nov 10, 2004 at 03:12 UTC
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by 2ge (Scribe) on Nov 10, 2004 at 08:22 UTC
    Why isn't there the bast windows mail client THE BAT ? Everyone should try it.
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by gri6507 (Deacon) on Nov 10, 2004 at 12:18 UTC
    Just as a warning to anyone who was considering using Outlook Express - DONT! Yes, everything will work fine ... most of the time, but sooner or later you will realize that you want to get away from OE ... and you won't be able to because that mailbox format is proprietary (like everything else in MS) and its export tools are pretty poor. And God forbit you try to import that data into a non-MS mail client ... you're in for a surprise :-)
      "but sooner or later you will realize that you want to get away from OE ... and you won't be able to because that mailbox format is proprietary (like everything else in MS) and its export tools are pretty poor."

      That's why Thunderbird has a more than decent "import" feature and will at least convert your OE-mail to mbox format ;)

      --
      b10m

      All code is usually tested, but rarely trusted.
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by poqui (Deacon) on Nov 11, 2004 at 18:26 UTC
    I use Mozilla's mailreader when I am able. At werk though, I must use Outlook, but I do so under protest.
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by lemming (Priest) on Nov 14, 2004 at 06:33 UTC
    I tend to open the envelope and read it at my desk... -Mark
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by BrentDax (Hermit) on Nov 14, 2004 at 23:09 UTC
    It's a shame that Gmail gets lumped in with lesser Web interfaces like Hotmail, but there isn't a separate option, so...

    =cut
    --Brent Dax
    There is no sig.

Re: How I usually read my mail:
by Anonymous Monk on Nov 15, 2004 at 01:35 UTC
      Yes, and it has a perl plugin too! <http://sylpheed-claws.sourceforge.net/plugins.php>
Re: How I usually read my mail:
by belg4mit (Prior) on Nov 15, 2004 at 04:36 UTC
    The true UNIX mail system, MH. Current incarnation is nmh

    --
    I'm not belgian but I play one on TV.

      And bindings for the One True Editor with MH-E. I used that for a while on my migration from Mutt through MH-E to Thunderbird, which is a story in itself. I liked MH-E all right. If you want to read your mail in Emacs and like MH, you may consider it.

      -- Mike

      --
      XML::Simpler does not require XML::Parser or a SAX parser. It does require File::Slurp.
      -- grantm, perldoc XML::Simpler

Re: How I usually read my mail:
by Beechbone (Pilgrim) on Nov 17, 2004 at 16:00 UTC
    I picked "Web Interface" but wanted to add that I coded it myself in Perl...

    Search, Ask, Know

View List Of Past Polls


Log In?
Username:
Password:

What's my password?
Create A New User
Chatterbox?
and the web crawler heard nothing...

How do I use this? | Other CB clients
Other Users?
Others pondering the Monastery: (11)
As of 2014-07-25 07:51 GMT
Sections?
Information?
Find Nodes?
Leftovers?
    Voting Booth?

    My favorite superfluous repetitious redundant duplicative phrase is:









    Results (169 votes), past polls