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Perl template file in windows new menu

by inman (Curate)
on Mar 22, 2004 at 10:27 UTC ( #338593=perlquestion: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??
inman has asked for the wisdom of the Perl Monks concerning the following question:

On my old PC, I had set up a template associated with Perl so that you could right click the mouse in a directory and choose 'New Perl Script'. The file itself would be copied from a template file. This shortcut was very handy for starting new scripts quickly.

The association consists of a registry setting (to connect the .pl extension with the ability to make a new file) and the template file itself (held under the system directory).

Despite much Googling, I have been unable to reproduce the configuration under Windows XP professional. My old setup was W2K. I would be grateful for advice in this matter.

Comment on Perl template file in windows new menu
Re: Perl template file in windows new menu
by Roger (Parson) on Mar 22, 2004 at 11:53 UTC
  • Save the Perl template you wish to use immediately under C:\windows\ShellNew -- it is a hidden folder.
  • Start the Registry Editor
  • Open HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT and find the extension for that file type. Add a new key called ShellNew
  • Under the new key, add a string value called FileName
  • Double-click on the string, and modify it to be the filename of the blank template file you created, including the extension
  • Exit the Registration Editor and restart Windows

      This is what I tried without success (hence my frustration). I have just installed TweakUI which has a facility to manage templates. I noticed that the template files have been moved under Windows XP. They are now in the C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Templates directory.

      Thanks!

      update: The Tweak UI procedure

      1. Load up TweakUI and find the 'Template' section in the left hand tree.
      2. Press the 'Create' button and browse to a Perl script that you want to use as a template. (at this point however the contents of the file don't really matter).
      3. TweakUI copies this file to C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Templates and for some reason gives it a numeric filename. You can edit this file to contain the defaults that you are looking for in a template.
      4. Restart your PC (This is required since Windows Explorer needs to scan your registry for ShellNew keys)

      You can also add a suitable description such as 'Perl Script' to the default value of the HKCR/Perl registry key so that Explorer prompts you with 'new Perl Script' rather than 'new .pl file'

Re: Perl template file in windows new menu
by ambrus (Abbot) on Mar 22, 2004 at 19:21 UTC

    I don't know how to put the entry in the "new" menu, however I'll give you a suggestion on how to acheive similar effect.

    When you select a directory, you get the familiar items open, expolre, find in the File menu and in the sf10 menu. You can add a new item under these, in the file associations dialog, that has an action like c:\windows\command\command.com /c echo, ">%1\New.pl", replacing command\command.com with system32\cmd.exe on NT-derived systems (including XP). Then, if you open a folder in Explorer, you can show the folder tree on the left side, select the folder in the tree, right-click on it, and chose the action. Then, the file "New.pl" gets created.

    I used a similar technique on my windows: I created an action c:\windows\command\command.com /k cd "%1", which spawns a new shell window that cd's in the directory.

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