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A classic use of prototypes: map2

by tkil (Monk)
on May 02, 2004 at 04:50 UTC ( #349747=perlmeditation: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??

Prototypes in perl5 have gotten a bit of a bad reputation, some of which is deserved. If people ask me why we should use them at all, however, I do have an example that always respond with map2, which is like the built-in map except that it accepts two arrays as arguments (instead of a single list).

=item my @result = map2 BLOCK ARRAY, ARRAY; Similar to c<map>, but operate on two lists at once. Inside the BLOCK, the value are passed in as C<$a> and C<$b> (as in C<sort>). my @a = ( 1, 2, 5, 7, ); my @b = ( 3, 4, 6, 8 ); my @sums = map2 { $a+$b } @a, @b; my @prods = map2 { $a*$b } @a, @b; One use is to initialize hashes from two arrays. You can do this in straight perl with: my %hash; @hash{@hash_keys} = @values; With this subroutine, you could also do: my %hash = map2 { ( $a => $b ) } @hash_keys, @values; If the arrays are not the same length, the shorter array is used to limit how far we go in each array. BLOCK is evaluated in list context. =cut sub map2 ( & \@ \@ ) { my ( $code_ref, $a_ref, $b_ref ) = @_; my $rv_len = ( @$a_ref < @$b_ref ) ? @$a_ref : @$b_ref; my @rv; for ( my $i = 0; $i < $rv_len; ++$i ) { local ( $a, $b ) = ( $a_ref->[$i], $b_ref->[$i] ); push @rv, $code_ref->(); } return @rv; }

I know I saw something like this from Abigail (or is that Abigail-II?) in the late '90s, but I have since reimplemented it a few times. As I said, it serves as a handy example to demonstrate how prototypes make some things possible that would otherwise be difficult to impossible to code.

Update (2004-05-02 00:15 -0700): Incorporated some suggestions from Zaxo to fix some misleading variable names. Thanks!

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Re: A classic use of prototypes: map2
by Zaxo (Archbishop) on May 02, 2004 at 05:47 UTC

    Shouldn't $max_index be $min_index and look like this?

    my $min_index = @$a_ref < @$b_ref ? $#$a_ref : $#$b_ref;
    There is no need to localize or subvert $a and $b. Just make the coderef act on $_[0] and $_[1] or their lexical copies.

    After Compline,
    Zaxo

      Shouldn't $max_index be $min_index

      Well, it's the minimum of the two indexes ... but it's the maximum value that the loop counter runs to. I was apparently thinking of the latter when I named the variable. Suggestions on a better name are welcome. (Maybe $shortest_array_len, which is closer in spirit to your suggestion as well as describing its role in the loop...)

      There is no need to localize or subvert $a and $b. Just make the coderef act on $_[0] and $_[1] or their lexical copies.

      My original code did exactly that... but I found myself using $a and $b anyway. And since perl exempts them from use strict checking, it would always take me a while to figure out what was going wrong.

      For the record, the original that I spruced up a bit:

        You get trouble with undefined quantities if you go beyond the minimum last index. Your updated code still uses @$arrayref instead of $#$arrayref as the last index of the referenced array.

        After Compline,
        Zaxo

Re: A classic use of prototypes: map2
by Errto (Vicar) on May 02, 2004 at 18:54 UTC

    I'm a big fan of this sort of thing. In fact my other favorite programming language, Haskell, has a built-in function called "zipWith" that does precisely this. Combined with lazy operators, this lets you do things like define the Fibonacci sequence:

    fib = 1 : 1 : zipWith (+) fib (tail fib)

    where (+) is equivalent to your {$a+$b}, ":" is how you say "cons" or, arguably, unshift, and "tail" is how you say "cdr" or, arguably, @foo[1 .. $#foo], but without necessarily making a copy.

      I'm a big fan of this sort of thing. In fact my other favorite programming language, Haskell

      I do a little bit of functional programming (mostly emacs-lisp, of all things), but I do enjoy it. Did you see tye's mention of his module Algorithm::Loops? If you like the functional style, that looks like some good stuff in there.

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