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Re: Programming is combat

by castaway (Parson)
on Jul 08, 2004 at 11:28 UTC ( #372754=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Programming is combat

My thought on Train as you fight (Which sounds the opposite to "More sweat in training is less blood in war" to me, as that implies training before fighting.. but whatever.. ):

Train/learn during development/design, as opposed to during the "war", which I would define as crisis times when a customer has found a bug that needs to be fixed yesterday. At this point, there shouldnt be learning going on, just application of knowledge.

Overall, it sounds like a good set of anologies, that make quite a bit of sense.. (Why does it remind me of of the Marcinko books?)

C.


Comment on Re: Programming is combat
Re^2: Programming is combat
by Paulster2 (Priest) on Jul 09, 2004 at 11:50 UTC

    Actually the Train as you fight and More sweat in training is less blood in war are two seperate principles. First, the "More...." implies that the more you train, the less lives are lost during war. The second, "Train...", implies that if you train differently than you fight, you are preparing for the wrong war. Basically its a quantity vs. quality type of difference. Both imply that less casualties will occur if there is training involved.

    I started writing about a corrolary between this and programming and realized that you said almost verbatim what I was starting to say...so I will bow, once again, to your wisdom castaway.

    Paulster2


    PS: Marcinco never had it so good.

    You're so sly, but so am I. - Quote from the movie Manhunter.

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