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How do I interpret mtime with stat()?

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Contributed by Anonymous Monk on Oct 21, 2000 at 10:35 UTC
Q&A  > directories


Description:

With: $mtime = (stat $filename)[9];
I get a number. What do I do with that number?

Answer: How do I interpret mtime with stat()?
contributed by mitd

mtime as returned by (stat($filename))[9] is seconds since the epoch on your particular platform.
To see when the beginning of your machine's epoch was:

print scalar gmtime(0);

Some modules useful for working with date/time:

Answer: How do I interpret mtime with stat()?
contributed by extremely

mtime is the number of seconds since 1970 (at least on UNIX-ish systems).
You can compare it to time() to see how old the file is.

my $mtime = (stat $filename)[9]; my $age = time() - $mtime; die "HEY! $filename was created in the future!\n" if $age < 0; print "$filename is $age seconds old\n";
Answer: How do I interpret mtime with stat()?
contributed by Klem

If you don't need the other stuff that comes from stat(), you may want to consider using the -M file test operator, which yields the age (since 'last modified') for the file, in (fractional) days.

Answer: How do I interpret mtime with stat()?
contributed by Anonymous Monk

if you want to know everything about the time, use the localtime function:

my $mtime = (stat $filename)[9]; my($sec,$min,$hour,$mday,$mon,$year,$wday,$yday,$isdst) = localtime($m +time);
All list elements are numeric, and come straight out of a struct tm. ... In particular this means that #mon has the range 0..11, $wday has the range 0..6, and the year has had 1,900 subtracted from it. (You can remember which ones are 0-based because those are the ones you're always using as subscripts into 0-based arrays containing the month and day names.)

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