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Re: How we use Perl.

by pg (Canon)
on Nov 07, 2004 at 20:42 UTC ( #405929=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to How we use Perl.

"It's very difficult to get reliable, high quality Perl Packages from developers who just think that Perl is a just a good way to search through log files."

Although Perl is a good tool to search through log files, mainly because its strong regexp support, Perl can obviously do much much more than that. For whoever thinks Perl is only good for that, there is not much need to reason with them.

However, on the other hand, it is definitely a valid thought, for some people not to use Perl as a language for full-scale applications, but only use it to develop various tools to ease their life. Perl is handy and support rapid development very well. This is just one school of thought, however it is a valid one, and lots of people who belong to this school are capable of creating quantity Perl code and packages ;-)


Comment on Re: How we use Perl.
Re^2: How we use Perl.
by osunderdog (Deacon) on Nov 08, 2004 at 17:15 UTC

    The Quality in-house Perl packages item is related to groups in our organization that are tasked with providing Perl packages for existing in-house libraries. Most of them are very familiar with C/C++ and have used Perl for simple things.

    They get wrapped around the axle when converting C/C++ apis that follow the memory allocation axiom:

    He who allocates memory shall deallocate memory.

    For those that have had this axiom burned into their brain, it is very difficult to pass back a reference to something in any language that they have created in the function.

    We fear change. --Garth

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