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I prefer this kind of clock or watch:

by ambrus (Abbot)
on Jan 16, 2006 at 04:21 UTC ( #523391=poll: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??

vote on I prefer this kind of clock or watch:

digital
[bar] 94/26%
analog
[bar] 137/38%
analog, circle divided to 24 hours
[bar] 24/7%
sundial
[bar] 31/9%
none
[bar] 76/21%
362 total votes
Comment on I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by bassplayer (Monsignor) on Jan 16, 2006 at 05:43 UTC
      sundial
      blazar@q ~ $ wc -l sundial.pl 595 sundial.pl blazar@q ~ $ perl -lpe '$_=localtime' Mon Jan 16 13:10:34 2006
Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by gube (Parson) on Jan 16, 2006 at 06:12 UTC
    I prefer analog clock or watch
Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by Aristotle (Chancellor) on Jan 16, 2006 at 06:21 UTC
Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by kalle (Friar) on Jan 16, 2006 at 06:50 UTC
    Digital. It's embarassing, but it always takes me longer to parse analog watches/clocks. Could it be I'm not as smart as my mother told me?
      Digital. It's embarassing, but it always takes me longer to parse analog watches/clocks. Could it be I'm not as smart as my mother told me?

      NO one is that smart ;-).

        I was googling "Kalle Pause" and came across this entry and I know that Kalle loves watches, but I don't even know if I will find my way to this location again. If this is the "Kalle Pause" then... of course you are as smart as your mom thought you to be. Lis
Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by jkva (Chaplain) on Jan 16, 2006 at 07:21 UTC
    I have a binary watch that I like :-) otherwise I'd go for digital, I like the way the numbers change.

      Your comment reminds me: Dali Clock.

      Makeshifts last the longest.

        I've always wanted one of the clocks from Persistence of Memory...

        emc

        " When in doubt, use brute force." — Ken Thompson

      I got a binary clock for Christmas last year, in the US. The problem is that I live in Europe, and while the converter I plugged it in delivers 110V, it doesn't change the frequency of the current, which apparently is used by the clock. So it ended up giving the wrong time, which took me a while to realize (I first blamed my internal binary to base-ten converter).

Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by davido (Archbishop) on Jan 16, 2006 at 07:44 UTC

    Other possible options:

    • Foucault Pendulum - Remember seeing these in science museums as kids?
    • Atomic clock -- But this is still a type of "digital" clock. Common digital clocks use an oscillating crystal for timing. Atomic clocks use an atomic resonance frequency counter, but both types require digital means to make sense of the timing source.
    • My internal clock

    Dave

      One more possible option: water clock (if I only had the $$ or the room), which is a bit of a step up from the clepsydra. .
        If you like it, you may enjoy the hydraulic calculator the same man (Bernard Gitton) made for the Science and Industry museum of La Villette, in Paris :)
Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by inman (Curate) on Jan 16, 2006 at 08:37 UTC
    I would prefer not to be needlessly hassled by the march of time. Let me walk in the country where I can watch the days and nights as the seasons pass.
      And yet I know people who live in the country who can't wait to get to the hustle and bustle of "the big city", even where "the big city" is a city the size of Indianapolis. Such is the human condition, I suppose.

      --
      tbone1, YAPS (Yet Another Perl Schlub)
      And remember, if he succeeds, so what.
      - Chick McGee

Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by marto (Chancellor) on Jan 16, 2006 at 09:49 UTC
    I prefer my wind up chairman Mao watch. He waves his right arm once a second! 1 UKP on ebay :)

    Martin
Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by tweetiepooh (Friar) on Jan 16, 2006 at 11:01 UTC
    We have the Eliana 20 week old clock. Don't know what time standard she operates on but whatever it is we (usually) need to resync ours to hers. The alarms on these systems are pretty good. Car and house manf's take note. You simply can't ignore them.

    Eventually we'll get hers to generally follow local time.
Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by ambrus (Abbot) on Jan 16, 2006 at 11:35 UTC
Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by mk. (Friar) on Jan 16, 2006 at 11:42 UTC
      They say
      It's easy for any self-respecting geek to figure out how to read this clock in a few minutes.
      However I still don't get it how it comes to this example:
      X O X -- 8 XOXXO -- 4 XXXXOO -- 2 OXXXOX -- 1 10 hours 48 minutes 36 seconds
      Edit: /me slaps forehead, you got to read it digit by digit.


      holli, /regexed monk/
Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by mirod (Canon) on Jan 16, 2006 at 12:14 UTC

    Analog, with a small digital display so I can get an alarm clock, watchclock, alternate time zones... but still be able to read the time quickly (I come from an era before digital).

Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by abcde (Scribe) on Jan 16, 2006 at 12:27 UTC

    Analog. I have analog at home (on walls) but digital is used in computers and mobile phones and other such things, so it seems to be used more often (annoyingly)

    I remember that OS X can have an analog clock, but it's not exactly the easiest thing to read on the menu bar. That's probably why they're not used so much.

Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by PerlBear (Hermit) on Jan 16, 2006 at 14:12 UTC
    With Certainty I vote for the 24 hour Digital Format.
    In my opinion, it is a more efficient/effective means for telling time especially for logging or record keeping of any sort.
    You don't have to worry about the AM/PM distinction.
Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by diotalevi (Canon) on Jan 16, 2006 at 17:27 UTC

    I've seen a very nice little sun powered pocket watch. It's a ring shaped device which you hang from a string (maybe your necklace). You move a slider to the proper month to adjust where a pinhole is. Then you just hold it up in the sun and see what etchings the sun is shining on. Tre cool.

    ⠤⠤ ⠙⠊⠕⠞⠁⠇⠑⠧⠊

      Any idea where I can get one?

      print substr("Just another Perl hacker", 0, -2);
      - apotheon
      CopyWrite Chad Perrin

        I know how to find a crafter at MRF (a ren faire) who will cuss you out if you go into his shop and ask for them. If you ask me about this in the fall I could see if I can get more info on this for you.

        ⠤⠤ ⠙⠊⠕⠞⠁⠇⠑⠧⠊

Missing poll options
by Anonymous Monk on Jan 16, 2006 at 18:40 UTC
    • swatch .beat time
    • binary clock
    • counter-clock (runs backwards)
    • % date
    • % perl -e 'print time'
    Me, I mostly just use the unix date command (to get the day of the week, mostly) or just check the time on my cell phone. A watch seems fairly pointless to me, given that I live in a place where there's a clock in every subway station, pay phone, or public square.

      100 seconds/minute, 10 minutes/hour, 10 hours/day. It is not as bad as it seems (except if you want to divide the day into thirds)

        Metric time is almost identical to swatch .beat time (the difference is where you put the decimal point).

        You also need to specify which "metric time" you mean: a what place in the world is 00:00:00 the same as "midnight, local time"?

      • % 'date +"%Y%j %a %T %Z"

      I alias that to "fodate", and date +%Y%j to "odate".

      print substr("Just another Perl hacker", 0, -2);
      - apotheon
      CopyWrite Chad Perrin

Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by swampyankee (Parson) on Jan 16, 2006 at 20:27 UTC

    I've yet to see a watch that moves its hands in a continuous, as opposed to jerky fashion, so I guess you can argue analogue watches don't really exist (except for those sundials, which tend to be less than portable).

    I do, however, prefer the watches which do have those hand thingies to the ones which just have digits.

    emc

    " When in doubt, use brute force." — Ken Thompson

      I have seen a watch whose seconds hand rotated continuously (or at least it leaped more often than once per second). It was wierd.

      guess you can argue analogue watches don't really exist

      Sure, but only if you want to get all theoretical. Yes, quantum mechanics does state that all matter is discrete at the quantum level, and individual atoms are of course somewhat discrete entities, but that's a bit extreme. If you take that point of view, practially nothing is analogue -- at least, nothing tangible.

      My father had a watch with hands that ran quite smoothly; they may not be as popular as the "retro" jerky-motion watches currently in fashion, but they certainly existed and continue to exist.

      On the other hand, unless you want to get down to the level of quanta, you could still call it analog if it has a mechanical timepiece motion — it only approximates non-analog functionality that way.

      Also, of course, you could argue that even at the quantum level things are actually analog, since quanta are really only probability waveforms (from a certain perspective at least).

      This could get messy if I keep going. . . .

      print substr("Just another Perl hacker", 0, -2);
      - apotheon
      CopyWrite Chad Perrin

Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by Paulster2 (Priest) on Jan 17, 2006 at 00:29 UTC

    I don't see a selection for chronograph/digital? Otherwise I would say both.

    Paulster2


    .oO( If only I could think of something perlish to write.... )
Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by blue_cowdawg (Prior) on Jan 17, 2006 at 02:06 UTC

    I want my own atomic clock! Cesium beam frequency/time standard.. yeah.. that's it... then I can put up my own stratum 0 NTP server! Then I can RULE THE WORLD!! BWHAHAHAHAHAHA!


    Peter L. Berghold -- Unix Professional
    Peter -at- Berghold -dot- Net; AOL IM redcowdawg Yahoo IM: blue_cowdawg

      You can buy them...I've seen them advertised in aviation mags. Only a few thousand USD.

      Note that I am not talking about the "atomic clocks" usually advertised, which are "atomic" only in that they are synchronized via radio to one of the NIST's radio stations (WWUV, say), but the Real Thing. I'm at work so I'm not going to google AAAS or AIP to find them...

      emc

      " When in doubt, use brute force." — Ken Thompson
            You can buy them...I've seen them advertised in aviation mags. Only a few thousand USD.

        Yeah... I've seen them too. I used to work at a US Navy Level II Calibration lab at the Naval Submarine Support Facility New London (NAVSUBSUPFACNLON for you milspeak types) in 1977. We used to have a bank of them to calibrate the standards that came off the submarines that were used for navigation (and other!) purposes.

        About once a quarter someone would get the choice assignment of driving down to Washington DC to NIST to get them calibrated.

        About 5 years ago I actually saw one at a hamfest for sale for real cheap. When I picked it up to look it over I realized why it was so cheap. Something was rattling around in there and I didn't want to go any further in my examination. One of these days I'll buy one, but it is real low on my priority list somewhere behind the stuff I am aquiring for my brewery! :-D


        Peter L. Berghold -- Unix Professional
        Peter -at- Berghold -dot- Net; AOL IM redcowdawg Yahoo IM: blue_cowdawg

        The problem is, just buying your own atomic clock won't make you know the exact time. Have you ever wondered why Coordinated Universal time is called Coordinated? Well, I don't know. It could either be because it's generated by multiple atomic clocks around the word that are synchronized together. Or it could be because it's syncronized by leap seconds to the cosmologic time defined by two trees of Valinor (the relevation of the Sun around the Earth since the reforms).

Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by poqui (Deacon) on Jan 17, 2006 at 05:29 UTC
    I like 12 hour analog, but mostly because digital watches don't last long around me. I have an electromechanical pocket watch that seems to do ok.

    I do like some digital clocks, but I prefer the 24 hour format of time for them.
Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by Skeeve (Vicar) on Jan 17, 2006 at 07:06 UTC

    black 12 hour analog radio controlled wrist watch with solar cells, no numbers on the circle but a built-in digital calendar. Just the size of a 2 Euro coin but half the thickness.

    I think it would be extremly cool to have that. But even if it exists it would cost a fortune...


    s$$([},&%#}/&/]+}%&{})*;#$&&s&&$^X.($'^"%]=\&(|?*{%
    +.+=%;.#_}\&"^"-+%*).}%:##%}={~=~:.")&e&&s""`$''`"e
Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by kulls (Hermit) on Jan 17, 2006 at 08:21 UTC
    Why not both (analog and digital)? and here a real-time example too.
    -kulls
Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by Happy-the-monk (Monsignor) on Jan 17, 2006 at 09:27 UTC

    none

    No clock at all is it for me.

    I used to carry a wristwatch only when travelling time zones. I do without it even in those occasions for almost a year now now.

    While I share the need to be on time with most other monks who have a day-or-night-job, I try to break the scheme every now the soonest possible, gambling whith what people feel as time: "do you think we should call him right after finishing this bit of exercise here? Yes? Good." Only the combined inner clocks of the people involved should be used. It's not as easy as it sounds, but it's fun and it feels good.

    Cheers, Sören

    PS: anybody read Darwin's Watch?

Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by tbone1 (Monsignor) on Jan 17, 2006 at 12:21 UTC
    I prefer none. I have clocks on my cell phone, car dash, coffee maker, microwave, you name it. The last thing I need is another clock.

    In fact, the only place I've seen that doesn't have a clock is a lawyer's office, so they don't see how much you're spending on them. ... Bastages!

    --
    tbone1, YAPS (Yet Another Perl Schlub)
    And remember, if he succeeds, so what.
    - Chick McGee

Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by zombie_fred (Scribe) on Jan 17, 2006 at 17:02 UTC
    None, the Undead are Timeless....
    --
    zf
Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by Albannach (Prior) on Jan 17, 2006 at 17:33 UTC
    It must be analog - the speed of the hands allows an easy way to see the rate of passage of time, something you can't get from digital gauges.

    --
    I'd like to be able to assign to an luser

Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by gloryhack (Deacon) on Jan 17, 2006 at 19:05 UTC
    For the most part I don't concern myself with clock time, but on those rare occasions when I have reason to consider it, I prefer my analog pocket watch. I consider clock time to be an artificial construct to which much of human society has assigned too much importance.

    I'll do what I can, though, to minimize the run time of an application out of respect for the user and the finite duration of his or her time on Earth. That's the measure of time that matters.

Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by wolfger (Deacon) on Jan 17, 2006 at 19:05 UTC

    I prefer:
    no watch (it bothers my wrist)
    binary clock (to befuddle those who are stuck in a base-10 world)
    no timepieces at all, of any sort, if I could get away with just living life...

Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by BaldPenguin (Friar) on Jan 18, 2006 at 02:06 UTC
    An analog watch that does martian time, everyday at midnight it stops for 39 minutes then resumes

    Don
    WHITEPAGES.COM | INC
    Everything I've learned in life can be summed up in a small perl script!
Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by fraktalisman (Hermit) on Jan 19, 2006 at 15:34 UTC

    I don't wear a wristwatch for about 15 years now.

    There are so many clocks and watches everywhere anyway. In school I had the habit (and ability) to read other people's watches.
    Much later, when delivering mail on my bike, I still had no celly. But I knew every public clock (at crossroads, apothecaries, in shop windows etc) and every working phone box!

    Nowadays, everybody's got cell phones that show the time. This is a little boring in a way ... And I always wonder why on earth would anyone still wear a wristwatch?

Re: I prefer this kind of clock or watch:
by TrekNoid (Pilgrim) on Jan 19, 2006 at 22:56 UTC
    Actually, my favorite clock has always been the infamous: Ball Clock!

    TrekNoid

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