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Re: (OT) Real World Skills Versus CS Skills

by GhodMode (Pilgrim)
on Jan 24, 2006 at 09:06 UTC ( #525133=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to (OT) Real World Skills Versus CS Skills

Everyone has an opinion, but no one has answered the question.

Unfortunately, I'm not qualified, but I'll give it a shot...

  1. CS knowledge
    • Language Evolution
    • OO concepts and theories
    • compiler theory
    • Use-Case scenarios
    • Application Development Cycle
  2. Real world knowledge
    • source control
    • compilation environments and OS quirks, i.e.: Unix vs. Windows
    • Project needs evaluation (vs. Use-Case scenarios)
    • Deadline estimation
    • Application Development Cycle
  3. Overlap knowledge
    • Basic data types
    • OO concepts and implementation
    • Code reuse (libraries, modules, etc)

As I said, I'm not really qualified. I've had some real-world experience and no book lernin' other than taking the initiative to read the K&R book and a few books with animals on the cover.

I put "Application Development Cycle" in two places on purpose. It seems to me that what's written in some computer books doesn't work in real life. So, the Application Development Cycle has to be adapted from what people learn in school.

My opinions are mostly based on people I've met. I've met a few book-lernt people who wanted to stick to a development cycle... they took as long to draw up their snazzy diagrams as it would have taken to do a significant part of the application.

--
-- GhodMode


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