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Re^2: what to do when you screw-up?

by Anonymous Monk
on Feb 27, 2006 at 21:59 UTC ( #533180=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Re: what to do when you screw-up?
in thread what to do when you screw-up?

Some people advocate always writing the best quality code you can, at all times: this is a nice goal, but sometimes management won't let you do it. You have to respect this; sometimes your perception of the long term business risk won't match your employer's;

If only it were that easy. This is complicated by the fact that your reputation is created from the code you write. Even if it's management specifically tells you not to spend any time commenting/documenting/simplifying your code, its your reputation that is on the line when another programmer comes along and sees your name attached to the code.

Your own minimum standard needs to be maintained, even when doing the work for others.


Comment on Re^2: what to do when you screw-up?
Re^3: what to do when you screw-up?
by Anonymous Monk on Feb 27, 2006 at 23:56 UTC
    Your own minimum standard needs to be maintained, even when doing the work for others.

    That's not always legal; when hired to do a job, you're really only legally allowed do what your superiors tell you. It's their money and their company, not yours. Using it to advance your own personal goals is unethical at best, and even criminal at worst.

    If you find it morally objectionable to do a certain task, you can always resign. I've done it ( in the middle of the .com bust, too). I didn't regret it, though money was tight for a while.

    --
    Ytrew

      Assuming your own minimum standard has some grounding in industry minimum standard, then it isnít illegal or immoral. Obviously if your minimum standard is something that would be unexpected from a computer programmer, you would need to make sure the company is aware of it before they hire you.

      The company doesnít own you just because they pay your salary. If they hired you on as a computer programmer, then you arenít being insubordinate when you insist on following standard practices of a computer programmer.
        Assuming your own minimum standard has some grounding in industry minimum standard, then it isnít illegal or immoral.

        Unless you work in an industry where there is a legislated "industry standard" (such as certain types of engineering), this doesn't apply.

        The company doesnít own you just because they pay your salary. If they hired you on as a computer programmer, then you arenít being insubordinate when you insist on following standard practices of a computer programmer.

        The typical contract reads: "you'll do what we ask of you", just in fancy language. There's almost always some innocuous looking little clause that reads: "and other duties as necessary". There's seldom, if ever, a clause that says: "You can spent our money doing work in the way that you like, but we've specifically told you that we don't".

        So, unless there are a specific set of laws in your jurisdiction permitting you to disobey your employer's wishes regarding the assets they've paid for, you just... can't. It's simple contract and property law. --
        Ytrew

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