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Re^3: You've just spilled something on your tie at lunch... Do you:

by Porculus (Hermit)
on Sep 24, 2007 at 17:53 UTC ( #640762=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Re^2: You've just spilled something on your tie at lunch... Do you:
in thread You've just spilled something on your tie at lunch... Do you:

Right, but a professional what? Different professions dress differently. You don't see many professional soldiers going into combat wearing ties, for example.

Seems your company president wants you all to think and act like people who naturally wear ties, i.e. businessmen like himself; which is all very well, but it would be nice if he could do so without suggesting that the rest of us do not have every right to be considered professional based on the quality of our work and our dedication to it, rather than on whether we tie bits of brightly-coloured cloth round our necks or not.


Comment on Re^3: You've just spilled something on your tie at lunch... Do you:
Re^4: You've just spilled something on your tie at lunch... Do you:
by PugSA (Beadle) on Oct 02, 2007 at 07:26 UTC

    You don't see many professional soldiers going into combat wearing ties, for example.

    This is probably one of the most ironic statments I've read in a long time, the tie originates from war, it was a cloth in my language called a 'krawat' that you used in combat to clean the bionet, esier to clean than all your clothes when in the field for weeks. The 'Krawat' became an accesory to parades, and from there THE TIE

    The tie is not a very comfortable accesory, espsially for a programmer. If you program you should not deal with clients to often but then it is true especially in South Africa if I visit my clients with a tie instead of the jeans an t-shirt I prefer to wear it does make an impression

    Even the tie has a time and place ...

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