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Re: Refactoring

by Rudif (Hermit)
on Apr 08, 2001 at 02:20 UTC ( #70752=note: print w/replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Refactoring

You can get a list of them at his website, http://www.refactoring.org.
Nope, the correct URL seems to be http://www.refactoring.com.

I like the XP ideas and I practice them, though not formally and eXtremely. I tend to write and run scripts for functional testing of my modules as I develop them.

stephen, do you practice unit testing and did you use PerlUnit modules from http://www.xprogramming.com/software.htm?
If yes, could you comment on your experience? How does it relate to the standard Test and test::Harness modules?

Rudif

Replies are listed 'Best First'.
Re: Re: Refactoring
by stephen (Priest) on Apr 08, 2001 at 05:03 UTC

    My testing practice is that I refuse to modify code unless at least one test has been defined on it. That lets me apply tests where they're needed, but means I don't need to interrupt development until I can develop a battery of tests for all known functionality. I use (as I suspect you do) the standard Test and Test::Harness modules, and am more-or-less satisfied with them.

    Initially, I took a look at the PerlUnit module on xprogramming. In my humble opinion, it's not too well documented and lacks a standard install. Plus, PerlUnit seems to be by default packaged in a ZIP file-- slightly more Windows-specific than I'd prefer.

    The CPAN TestUnit module seems more versatile and mature, and I'm a bit surprised that the xprogramming page doesn't link to it instead. (No offense to the author of PerlUnit, whoever she may be.) TestUnit generates both xUnit-friendly and Test::Harness-friendly output. (This is based primarily on reading the docs, not from actual use.) It's based on JUnit, which I've used and I like. Like JUnit, it has good support for setup and teardown of tests. I intend to try using it on future projects.

    In terms of actual testing functionality, I haven't seen too much out there that the standard Test module doesn't offer. Test::Simple gives a way of naming tests. Test::Cmd is best for testing the output of external scripts and programs.

    For CGI scripts, CGI::Test allows you to run your scripts from the command line as though they were running in CGI context. I haven't tried using it yet, but I will as part of this discussion, and will post the results here.

    In actual practice, I use the regular Test module (like I said) and supplement it with some modules of my own, which I'm working on packaging up for CPAN (hopefully sometime this week). The primary things that Test is missing, in my experience, are output tests. Things like:

    • Comparing the printed-to-STDOUT output of code against a pre-stored file
    • Comparing e-mail sent to a test user against a pre-stored file
    • Checking that records inserted into a given database match a hash or array of hashes

    Anyway, I'm working up some examples, both of applying refactorings and of tests, and will be posting further followups. There's a great deal to explore here, and PerlMonks is the place to do it!

    Update: Corrected a misstatement about Test::Cmd.

    stephen

      Thank you, stephen, for sharing your experience and for pointing out the CPAN module TestUnit - it looks promising.

      Rudif

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[ambrus]: Corion: well Prima::Object says something like that the cleanup method will send an onDestory message and that you can't get more messages after cleanup, or something.
[Corion]: ambrus: Yeah - I don't think the deep source dive will be necessary if things are implemented as simple as they could be :)) And hopefully I won't need (more) timely object destruction. I can update the screen at 60Hz and hopefully even do HTTP ...
[Corion]: ... transfers in the background. Now that I think about it, this maybe even means that I can run the OpenGL filters on Youtube input :)
[ambrus]: Corion: I mentioned that the unix event loop of Prima always wakes up at least once every 0.2 seconds. Have you found out whether the win32 event loop of Prima does that too?
[Corion]: ambrus: Hmm - I would assume that the onDestroy message is sent from the destructor and doesn't go through the messageloop, but maybe it is sent when a window gets destroyed but all components are still alive...
[ambrus]: Corion: partly deep source dive, partly just conservative coding even if it adds an overhead.
[Corion]: ambrus: Hmm - no, I haven't looked at wakeup intervals ... I wonder why it should want to wakeup periodically because it gets a lot of messages from the Windows message loop (on Windows obviously)
[ambrus]: (Alternately a deep source dive and then rewrite that event loop to make it better, and then as a bonus you get an idle method.)
[ambrus]: The 0.2 seconds wakeup is likely a workaround for some bug, but I can't guess what bug that is.
[ambrus]: It's been there since Prima 1.00 iirc

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