Beefy Boxes and Bandwidth Generously Provided by pair Networks
Your skill will accomplish
what the force of many cannot
 
PerlMonks  

(tye)Re3: Why Closures?

by tye (Cardinal)
on Apr 26, 2001 at 23:55 UTC ( #75882=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Re (tilly) 2: Why Closures?
in thread Why Closures?

I think your point is that a system of closures is probably more powerful than a system of objects. I don't disagree with that [ I won't go quite so far as to agree, but I do suspect that you might be right (: ]. I think that frankus' point was that a single closure is very much like a single, very simple object. I will go so far as to completely agree with that.

A closure is very much like an object with a single method. This can be a great advantage if you want "an object with a single method" because a closure doesn't require you to create all of that OO baggage (most notably a class name that must fit into a global namespace).

Since I'm standing up here and some of you are looking at me, here is my breakdown of the major programming methodologies supported by Perl:

Procedural programming has data and subroutines and you associate them together "by hand". Object-oriented programming has data where each type of data is tightly associated with a collection of subroutines. Functional programming treats subroutines as data and allows you to associate items of data with each subroutine.

Now, if you do a whole project using one methodology, then more differences crop up. But I like to mix methodologies in Perl so those are the main difference for me.

So if I want a collection of subroutines that work on similar data, I'll create a class (and make it a module).

If I have a single subroutine that works on different instances of similar data, then I have to decide whether I'm likely to want to add more subroutines later. If so, I'll make a class. If not, I'll make closures.

If I have a chunk of behavior that I want to allow people to change, then I'll probably use a code reference. If that behavior should be associated to different instance of similar data, then I'll use a closures.

        - tye (but my friends call me "Tye")


Comment on (tye)Re3: Why Closures?

Log In?
Username:
Password:

What's my password?
Create A New User
Node Status?
node history
Node Type: note [id://75882]
help
Chatterbox?
and the web crawler heard nothing...

How do I use this? | Other CB clients
Other Users?
Others cooling their heels in the Monastery: (6)
As of 2015-07-03 17:20 GMT
Sections?
Information?
Find Nodes?
Leftovers?
    Voting Booth?

    The top three priorities of my open tasks are (in descending order of likelihood to be worked on) ...









    Results (54 votes), past polls