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Re^3: Site facelift?

by Anonymous Monk
on Nov 18, 2010 at 05:02 UTC ( #872137=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Re^2: Site facelift?
in thread Site facelift?

Your argument seems reasonable, And I completely agree with you on that Perl not being used for new projects part. I have noticed that too.

For Perl to not go down the awk way, it must be used for more than throw away scripting. And most importantly in new projects. From what I've seen and heard across the industry, the mood is use Perl if and only if there is no way out and never for a new project. If new projects don't get written then students and newbies feel no need to learn it and thats how slowly things become irrelevant.

Perception management is important, some things get sold just by word of mouth of advertising. A lot of it is due to buzz. Frequent mention of Django and Ruby on rails on forums like reddit/HN/Stackoverflow is more than sufficient to convince clueless programmers that Ruby and Python are good even if they are not. They just go by the advertising and when they visit their websites, shiny stuff and beautiful GUI's only strengthen their beliefs.

The issue is Perl doesn't even get a mention these days, thats how bad things are at the moment.


Comment on Re^3: Site facelift?
Re^4: Site facelift?
by Your Mother (Canon) on Nov 18, 2010 at 05:30 UTC

    This is a tired and bottomless topic and I'm an inveterate Perl hacker but just to clarify, Ruby and Python are good.

      The point is deliberate refusal to adopt to a acknowledged trend thats going around currently. And Perl folks seem to do it because of the Not Invented here Syndrome.

      What benefit is there in not recognizing the importance of a good looking site? If only content was important we would all be making phone calls and drawing money out of ATMs through command lines. But things don't work that way in the world, Unfortunately. Perception drives most of our choices.

        Howdy!

        How is "refusal to adopt an acknowledged trend" a meaningful criticism? That's absurd.

        The site is not "ugly". It is highly functional and stable. You don't have to keep learning new quirks and unpleasant behavior on a weekly basis. This is not and should not be FaceBook. Change is incremental and deliberate. That is a Good Thing.

        yours,
        Michael

        There is so much wrong with that first paragraph. Deliberate, trend, acknowledged, NIHS... Hugely important swaths of modern Perl come from porting, often while improving, ideas from other languages Plack, KinoSearch, Catalyst, the ORMs, Moose.

        I like good looking sites. I don't agree that this one is bad looking. I'm quite neutral about it. I'm a designer. I agree with what herveus said. I come here to read and focus, not to be dazzled or distracted; this site's layout, as boring and old fashioned as it might be, affords exactly that. If you want a bridge to a more ideal/modern site, there's nothing stopping you from using and recommending StackOverflow's Perl tag. The discussions there seem to be less interesting, involved, and accurate though, and the best answers seem to mostly come from monks and major Perl figures, not average participants.

        Perception drives most of our choices

        Don't put me in your our and we. I'm too tired of this to mince words: perception only drives the choices of shallow, quick-fix jackasses. If the site design keeps that kind of person away, ++.

        You want Perl 6 now, write some. You want a pretty site, build it. Until you do one of those or at least start signing in with a username, you've seen the end of civility from me. COGTFO.

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