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Re: Regex question once-only use of chars in a charset

by CountZero (Bishop)
on May 15, 2011 at 13:19 UTC ( #904966=note: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Regex question once-only use of chars in a charset

I think it can be as simple as this:

use Modern::Perl; open my $WORDLIST, '<', './wordlist.txt' or die $!; my $available = 'AABCDEF'; $available = join '?', sort split '', $available; $available .= '?'; while (<$WORDLIST>) { chomp; my $sorted = join '', sort split ''; say if $sorted =~ /^$available$/io; }
Running this script with your 'AABCDEF' gives me the following results:
abe ace aced baa bad bade be bead bed cab cad cade cafe dab dace deaf deb decaf fab facade face faced fad fade fed
I use a 58,000 elements wordlist and it needed less than a few seconds to generate this result.

CountZero

A program should be light and agile, its subroutines connected like a string of pearls. The spirit and intent of the program should be retained throughout. There should be neither too little or too much, neither needless loops nor useless variables, neither lack of structure nor overwhelming rigidity." - The Tao of Programming, 4.1 - Geoffrey James


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Re^2: Regex question once-only use of chars in a charset
by John M. Dlugosz (Monsignor) on May 15, 2011 at 13:41 UTC
    Cool! Sorting the word as well is a game changer! Then you just check off the letters in order.
      It is an old trick. Transform both sides of the comparison to a canonical form and the whole problems becomes much easier to solve.

      CountZero

      A program should be light and agile, its subroutines connected like a string of pearls. The spirit and intent of the program should be retained throughout. There should be neither too little or too much, neither needless loops nor useless variables, neither lack of structure nor overwhelming rigidity." - The Tao of Programming, 4.1 - Geoffrey James

Re^2: Regex question once-only use of chars in a charset
by elef (Friar) on May 16, 2011 at 10:52 UTC
    What's the o in say if $sorted =~ /^$available$/io;?
    I know i is for case-insensitive matching, but I can't find an o modifier in the documentation.

      The  /o modifier means "compile once" for a regex it modifies. Consider these examples:

      >perl -wMstrict -le "my $s = '1a2b3c'; ;; print qq{no /o}; for my $i (qw(3 2 1)) { print qq{matched '$1'} if $s =~ m{ ($i.) }xms; } ;; print qq{with /o}; for my $i (qw(3 2 1)) { print qq{matched '$1'} if $s =~ m{ ($i.) }xmso; } " no /o matched '3c' matched '2b' matched '1a' with /o matched '3c' matched '3c' matched '3c'

      The function of the  /o modifier has been generally replaced by the qr// regex object builder (see in perlop).

      I was a bit surprised not to see anything about  /o in perlre, but it is (briefly and obliquely) discussed in qr/STRING/msixpodual (5.14), and the following remains in perlretut (at least through 5.12):

      Optimizing pattern evaluation
      We pointed out earlier that variables in regexps are substituted before the regexp is evaluated:
      $pattern = 'Seuss'; while (<>) { print if /$pattern/; }
      This will print any lines containing the word "Seuss". It is not as efficient as it could be, however, because Perl has to re-evaluate (or compile) $pattern each time through the loop. If $pattern won't be changing over the lifetime of the script, we can add the "//o" modifier, which directs Perl to only perform variable substitutions once:
      #!/usr/bin/perl # Improved simple_grep $regexp = shift; while (<>) { print if /$regexp/o; # a good deal faster }

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