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General Computer Science: For Beginners

by perl.j (Pilgrim)
on Jul 18, 2011 at 01:59 UTC ( #915053=perlquestion: print w/ replies, xml ) Need Help??
perl.j has asked for the wisdom of the Perl Monks concerning the following question:

Fellow Monks,

I am trying to advance my knowledge of Perl. But to do so, I feel that I need to understand more about General Computer Science. The only problem is, I can't seem to find the right references. Can anyone give me the info or give me a reference to find the info? I would very much appreciate it.
perl.j-----A Newbie To Perl

Comment on General Computer Science: For Beginners
Re: General Computer Science: For Beginners
by FunkyMonk (Canon) on Jul 18, 2011 at 02:15 UTC
      Nothing was wrong with it. In fact, it was perfect for me. This is a separate question all to itself.
      perl.j-----A Newbie To Perl
Re: General Computer Science: For Beginners
by luis.roca (Deacon) on Jul 18, 2011 at 02:33 UTC

    Academic Earth : Computer Science Video Courses

    As an aside, you should spend some time searching the site and especially many of the members' home nodes. People post all kids of great links, tutorials and other fun snippets. You've been given a TON of great advice and information in the short time you've been here. My advice (for whatever you think it's worth) take at least the same time and care to explore all that information as was spent by quite a few monks providing it to you. :-)

    If you need another head start my home node has a bunch of links worth exploring. Again, make sure you check out other monks that are listed there and especially one's who have replied to your questions. I hope you enjoy digging through all that information as much as I have and will continue to do. When you have specific questions on any of those materials definitely post it and (as you've already seen) monks will gladly help you.

    Good luck perl.j :)


    "...the adversities born of well-placed thoughts should be considered mercies rather than misfortunes." Don Quixote
      I appreciate all of the advice and reference I have been given over the past weeks. I excelled in Perl faster than I could have expected. I am already using most of the info from my last question, and plan to use all of it. Even the questions I've had before I have made great use of. This was just a question that I couldn't find a great book/link on in all of the searching I've been doing. Thank You very much luis.roca.
      perl.j-----A Newbie To Perl
Re: General Computer Science: For Beginners
by Anonymous Monk on Jul 18, 2011 at 07:11 UTC
Re: General Computer Science: For Beginners
by zentara (Archbishop) on Jul 18, 2011 at 12:18 UTC
Re: General Computer Science: For Beginners
by gnosti (Friar) on Jan 25, 2012 at 07:13 UTC
    My approach to learning CS has been to start projects. I come up to a wall, bang my head, and eventually find how OO, grammars, graphs or exception handling can help me. It's all CS, but in relation to a real project. Any sufficiently advanced project will pull in quite a bit of CS. As someone else suggested, reading perlmonks is a great way to learn.

    For books, Higher Order Perl is outstanding (although I've barely scratched the surface.) Mastering Algorithms in Perl is a good reference in theory; in practice, I haven't needed what it offers, although knowledge of algorithms appears to be foundation for many CS courses.

    Finally, learning version control (principally git) has dramatically changed how I work. If you do a project of 50 lines or more, you need this!

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