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But your choice is unfortunate.

Interesting comment. Id be interested in hearing more about why you think this was an unfortunate choice.

And how the C-style loop is more cumbersome but more adaptable.

A C-Style for loop is always functionally and internally equivelent to a suitably constructed while loop. The primary differences being that many programmers from a C tradition find the for(;;) syntax more readable, while the rest of us find the while syntax more readble and maintainable. I am in the latter group. :-) Nine time out of ten (more really) when I see someone use a C-Style for loop they are not exploiting the equivelence to a while , but rather using a slightly less readble, more error prone and less efficient form of a for (LIST) loop. I avoid the term foreach because foreach is a synonym to for in perl, they are identical.

E:\Smoke\source>perl -e "foreach (my $i=0;$i<10;$i++) { print $i,$/}" E:\Smoke\source>perl -e "for (my $i=0;$i<10;$i++) { print $i,$/}"
Insofar that the majority of its use is to simulate for ($m..$n) where $m<$n I think advising people to convert to the more legible and less error prone form is probably a good idea. And I also think that its a good idea to use while () {} continue {} instead of for(;;) if only because it tends to be easier to read. Having said that in the time ive been using perl I think ive needed the construct a mere handful of times.

Ultimately id argue that for(;;) is a construct mostly provided to reduce the pain for C junkies, and that in the long term better constructs that are more intuitive and less error prone are available and so should be encouraged.

--- demerphq
my friends call me, usually because I'm late....


In reply to Re: Re: Re: What training do YOU need? by demerphq
in thread What training do YOU need? by deprecated

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