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#!/usr/bin/perl ## no critic VersionVar use strict; use warnings; use Getopt::Long 'GetOptions'; use autouse 'File::Find' => 'find'; use autouse 'Pod::Usage' => 'pod2usage'; use autouse 'Term::ANSIColor' => 'colored'; use autouse 'IPC::Open3' => 'open3'; $SIG{CHLD} = 'IGNORE'; use vars qw( $TextOnly ); main(); exit; sub main { # Fetch parameters. GetOptions( man => sub { pod2usage( -verbose => 2 ) }, help => sub { pod2usage( -verbose => 1 ) }, t => \$TextOnly, l => \my ($filename_only), w => \my ($word), i => \my ($ignore_case), Q => \my ($quotemeta), h => \my ($no_filename), n => \my ($line_no), R => \my ($no_recursive), v => \my ($invert_match), plain => \my ($no_ansicolor), 'name=s' => \my ($filename_rx), ) or pod2usage( -verbose => 0 ); my ( $match, @srcs ) = @ARGV; if ( not @srcs ) { @srcs = '.'; ## no critic Noisy } # Validate parameters. if ( not defined $match ) { pod2usage( -verbose => 0 ); } # Pre-process the pattern and then compile it. if ($quotemeta) { $match = quotemeta $match; } if ($word) { $match = "\\b$match\\b"; } if ($ignore_case) { $match = "(?i)$match"; } my $match_rx = qr/$match/; # Get a function which formats the output for whatever was # requested. All info is passed through the globals # $File::Find::rel_name, $., and $_. The input will contain # whatever linebreak is currently active so most things don't need # to add one. my $prev_file = ''; my $formatter = ( $line_no && $no_filename ? sub { "$.:" . shift } : $line_no ? sub { if ( $File::Find::name ne $prev_file ) { $prev_file = $File::Find::name; return ( ( $prev_file eq '' ? '' : "\n" ) . colored( $File::Find::name, 'bold green' ) . "\n +$.:" . shift ); } else { return "$.:" . shift; } } : $no_filename ? sub {shift} : $filename_only ? sub { if ( $File::Find::name ne $prev_file ) { $prev_file = $File::Find::name; return ( ( $prev_file eq '' ? '' : "\n" ) . colored( $File::Find::name, 'bold green' ) . "\n" ); } else { return; } } : sub { if ( $File::Find::name ne $prev_file ) { $prev_file = $File::Find::name; return ( ( $prev_file eq '' ? '' : "\n" ) . colored( $File::Find::name, 'bold green' ) . "\n +" . shift ); } else { return shift; } } ); my $grep_file_fn = sub { grep_file( ignore_rcs => 1, plain => $no_ansicolor, match_rx => $match_rx, filename_rx => $filename_rx, formatter => $formatter, invert_match => $invert_match, match_once => $filename_only ); }; # Here's the main loop. For each source directory/file, search it. for my $src (@srcs) { # Examine all files in $src. if ($no_recursive) { # Mimic the API of File::Find for grep_file(). # local $File::Find::dir = unimplemented ## no critic local $File::Find::name = $src; local $_ = $src; $grep_file_fn->(); } else { find( $grep_file_fn, $src ); } } return 0; } sub open_file_harder { my ($filename) = @_; return if not defined $filename; if ( my ($extension) = $filename =~ /(\.[^.]+)\z/mx ) { my @readers = ( [ qr/\.t(?:ar\.)?gz\z/ => qw( gzcat ), $filename ], [ qr/\.zip\z/, => qw( unzip -p ), $filename ], [ qr/\.Z\z/ => qw( zcat ), $filename ], [ qr/\.gz\z/ => qw( gzcat ), $filename ], [ qr/\.bz2\z/ => qw( bzcat ), $filename ], ); for my $reader (@readers) { my ( $pattern, @command ) = @{$reader}; if ( $extension =~ $pattern ) { open3( undef, my $fh, undef, @command ); return $fh; } } } open my $fh, '<', $filename or die "Couldn't open $filename: $!"; return $fh; } sub grep_file { my %p = @_; my $match_rx = $p{match_rx}; my $formatter = $p{formatter}; my $invert_match = $p{invert_match}; my $plain = $p{plain}; my $match_once = $p{match_once}; my $filename = $_; # Ignore CVS stuff. return if $File::Find::name =~ m{/CVS/?}; # If there is a pattern required of filenames, try that one # first. This requires no checks to the FS so I'm doing this # before the next stuff. return if defined $p{filename_rx} and not $filename =~ $p{filename_rx}; # Ignore non-existant files. return if not -f $filename; # Ignore non-text files if that's what was requested. return if $TextOnly and not -T _; eval { my $fh = open_file_harder($filename); LINE: while ( my $line = <$fh> ) { # If the line matches the pattern print it as a formatted # line. my $matched; if ($plain) { $matched = ( $line =~ /$match_rx/mx ); } else { $matched = ( $line =~ /$match_rx/mx ); $line =~ s/((?:$match_rx)+)/ colored( "$1", 'yellow on_b +lack' ) /gemx; } # Given Match then exclusive or is great here. # 0 1 # +---+---+ # Invert 0 | | X | # 1 | X | | if ( $matched xor $invert_match ) { print $formatter->($line); last LINE if $match_once; } } }; return 1; } __END__ =head1 NAME dgrep - A recursive grep that uses perl regular expressions. =head1 SYNOPSIS dgrep [options] [file ...] Options: -help Prints this help message -man Prints the manual -t Searches only `text' files -w Matches only "words" using \b...\b -i Case-insensitive matching -Q Ignore perl meta-characters -v Invert output, match lines that don't match the pattern -h Exclude filename from output -n Include line number in output -R Disable recursion, no directories. -plain Disable highliting of matched text -name EXPR Only open files matching this regular expression =head1 OPTIONS =over 4 =item B<-help> Prints a simple message on usage and then exits. =item B<-man> Prints the manual and then exits. =item B<-t> Only `text' files are searched. =item B<-w> When matching, the pattern is surrounded by perl\'s \b assertion. That is, the match must be on a "word" boundary, either starting or finishing. To perl, "word" is locale specific but generally means any alphanumeric character and underscore. =item B<-i> Match without regard to casing. This is affected by locale. =item B<-Q> Pattern is a literal string. All regex metacharacters will be escaped using the quotemeta() function. =item B<-v> Print only lines which do B<not> match the pattern. This is equivalent to grep\'s -v parameter. =item B<-h> Omit the filename from the output when a line is matched. This is semi-equivalent to grep\'s -h parameter. =item B<-n> Print the line number. =item B<-R> Do not recurse into any subdirectories. =item B<-plain> C<dgrep> automatically inserts ANSI escape codes to highlight matched text. Use the C<-plain> option to disable that. =item B<-name> EXPR C<dgrep> usually searches every file and directory, recursively. When C<-name EXPR> is used, only filenames matching this regular expression are searched. =back =head1 DESCRIPTION B<dgrep> is an "improved" version of the grep that comes with the Sun box. It is normally recursive, accepts perl regular expressions, and optionally prints the filename the match was found in. =cut

In reply to diotalevi's grep by diotalevi

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