http://www.perlmonks.org?node_id=1214133


in reply to Subroutine Time::HiRes::Time redefined ... Help

In perl on windows you will get a warning for every subroutine in a Module being redefined, if somewhere in your code (or in some submodule) the given Module is used or required with the correct case, and somewhere else it is loaded with a missmatched case. e.g. in one place it is loaded using the correct case:
use Time::HiRes;
an it is loaded somewhere else with the wrong case:
# missspelled module name use TIME::HiRes;
Since TIME::HiRes is not loaded yet (only Time::HiRes is loaded), it will be loaded again, thus redefining the subroutines. The cause is Perl being case sensitive and the windows filesystem being case insensitive.

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Re^2: Subroutine Time::HiRes::Time redefined ... Help
by afoken (Canon) on May 07, 2018 at 18:14 UTC

    Good point. Having a look at %INC could help:

    C:\>perl -MData::Dumper -MdaTA::duMPer -E "say Dumper(\%INC)" $VAR1 = { 'daTA/duMPer.pm' => 'C:/strawberry/perl/lib/daTA/duMPer.pm', 'warnings/register.pm' => 'C:/strawberry/perl/lib/warnings/r +egister.pm', 'bytes.pm' => 'C:/strawberry/perl/lib/bytes.pm', 'XSLoader.pm' => 'C:/strawberry/perl/lib/XSLoader.pm', 'Carp.pm' => 'C:/strawberry/perl/lib/Carp.pm', 'Exporter.pm' => 'C:/strawberry/perl/lib/Exporter.pm', 'strict.pm' => 'C:/strawberry/perl/lib/strict.pm', 'warnings.pm' => 'C:/strawberry/perl/lib/warnings.pm', 'overload.pm' => 'C:/strawberry/perl/lib/overload.pm', 'Data/Dumper.pm' => 'C:/strawberry/perl/lib/Data/Dumper.pm', 'feature.pm' => 'C:/strawberry/perl/lib/feature.pm' }; C:\>

    Sorting the %INC keys definitively helps:

    C:\>perl -MData::Dumper -MdaTA::duMPer -E "say for sort { lc($a) cmp l +c($b) } keys %INC" bytes.pm Carp.pm daTA/duMPer.pm Data/Dumper.pm Exporter.pm feature.pm overload.pm strict.pm warnings.pm warnings/register.pm XSLoader.pm C:\>

    But the best way is to let perl find the problematic module name:

    C:\>perl -MData::Dumper -MdaTA::duMPer -E "my %oops; $oops{lc $_}++ fo +r keys %INC; say for grep { $oops{$_}>1 } keys %oops" data/dumper.pm C:\>

    Alexander

    --
    Today I will gladly share my knowledge and experience, for there are no sweeter words than "I told you so". ;-)