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in reply to Re: How to Rename files in multiple directories with a Perl script using an array of hashes.
in thread How to Rename files in multiple directories with a Perl script using an array of hashes.

Now that I have corrected the glob path array, only the FIRST _ character is being replaced, rather than every instance in the filename.

I just added an additional _ to a file in my test area and this problem occurs with my test code too.

Here's an example, names slightly modified.

rename(/mnt/hgfs/Subscriptions/Dr Wendy Testaburger/Dr Wendy Testaburg +er 20230523 Post_Stan_world 1920x1080.mp4, /mnt/hgfs/Subscriptions/Dr + Wendy Testaburger/Dr Wendy Testaburger 20230523 Post Stan_world 1920 +x1080.mp4)

For ease of reference, here is the relevant code:

my @path = glob("'$Subscriptions_Path/$_->{Lib_Sub_Path}/*'"); if (@path != 0) { File::Rename::rename(\@path,{ _code => sub { s/_/ / }, verbose => 1, no_action => 1, } ); };
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Re^3: How to Rename files in multiple directories with a Perl script using an array of hashes.
by hv (Prior) on Jun 11, 2023 at 19:13 UTC

    Now that I have corrected the glob path array, only the FIRST _ character is being replaced, rather than every instance in the filename.

    Ah, that'll be because that's what you've asked for: to replace them all, you need to add the //g flag ("global") to the substitution:

        _code     => sub { s/_/ /g },

      Thank you.

Re^3: How to Rename files in multiple directories with a Perl script using an array of hashes.
by kcott (Archbishop) on Jun 11, 2023 at 20:01 UTC
    "... only the FIRST _ character is being replaced ..."

    I guessed that you just needed the /g modifier; however, as I've never used File::Rename previously, I ran a test to make sure.

    ken@titan ~/tmp/pm_11152739_file_rename $ ls -1 'test 4_5 6' test_1_2_3 'test_a b_c d_e f' $ perl -e ' use strict; use warnings; use File::Rename "rename"; my @files = ( "test 4_5 6", "test_1_2_3", "test_a b_c d_e f", ); rename \@files, { _code => sub { s/_/ /g; }, verbose => 1, no_action => 1, }; ' rename(test 4_5 6, test 4 5 6) rename(test_1_2_3, test 1 2 3) rename(test_a b_c d_e f, test a b c d e f) $ ls -1 'test 4_5 6' test_1_2_3 'test_a b_c d_e f' $ perl -e ' use strict; use warnings; use File::Rename "rename"; my @files = ( "test 4_5 6", "test_1_2_3", "test_a b_c d_e f", ); rename \@files, { _code => sub { s/_/ /g; }, verbose => 1, }; ' test 4_5 6 renamed as test 4 5 6 test_1_2_3 renamed as test 1 2 3 test_a b_c d_e f renamed as test a b c d e f $ ls -1 'test 1 2 3' 'test 4 5 6' 'test a b c d e f'

    [Aside: "if (@path != 0) ..." would more usually be written as just "if (@path) ...".]

    See also:

    — Ken