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[OT] One for the weekend. (Updated: Answer posted!)

by BrowserUk (Patriarch)
on Mar 27, 2015 at 18:38 UTC ( #1121552=perlquestion: print w/replies, xml ) Need Help??

BrowserUk has asked for the wisdom of the Perl Monks concerning the following question:

Whilst waiting for my tea to brew, and thinking about my latest programming problem, I found myself 'walking the diagonals' on my tiled kitchen floor.

Walking the diagonals means starting in one corner of the rectangle and walking away at 45 degrees:

+---+---+--- | \ | | +---+---+--- | | \ | +---+---+--- | | | \

And when you hit the opposite edge, 'reflect' back in the other direction:

| \ | | | / | ---+---+---+---+---+ | | \ | / | | +---+---+---+---+---

Ditto at the ends:

| | / | +---+---+--- | / | | / +---+---+---+ | \ | / | +---+---+---+

The walk ends when you arrive directly into a corner. See the first diagram, but going the other way.

What I noticed was that starting in one corner, and continuing until I encountered another corner, I found myself in the diagonally opposite corner. When I drew a diagram on a post-it, I discovered that I had walked on every tile exactly once.

This was interesting, because I've been doing this 'walking the diagonals' when deep in thought -- a mindless repetitious activity that frees the mind for deeper things -- and recalled that in my old house kitchen, where the rectangle was the same width, but 2 tiles shorter, the tour also ended up in the opposite diagonal; also covered every tile exactly once and was 14 10 steps smaller.

How big is the rectangle in my current kitchen? Answer: 13 x 5.

(Other answers are possible, particularly 5x9 solution; but most of them would either have required me to use one of the terms: 'kitchenette' or 'galley' (as in train or ship) rather than kitchen :)

I was going to post code, but choroba's is much prettier; especially if you a) stop it considering even numbers; b) add a system 'cls'; or equivalent into the redraw loop; c) reduce the sleep time after the for loop to 1/10th second. Quite hypnotic once the sizes get up a bit (I start it at 21 and inc by 2).

Solution:

Old: 5x11 s/\/\/\/\/\ /\/\/\/\/\/ \/\/\/\/\/\ /\/\/\/\/\/ \/\/\/\/\/e New: 5x13 s/\/\/\/\/\/\ /\/\/\/\/\/\/ \/\/\/\/\/\/\ /\/\/\/\/\/\/ \/\/\/\/\/\/e

With the rise and rise of 'Social' network sites: 'Computers are making people easier to use everyday'
Examine what is said, not who speaks -- Silence betokens consent -- Love the truth but pardon error.
"Science is about questioning the status quo. Questioning authority". I'm with torvalds on this
In the absence of evidence, opinion is indistinguishable from prejudice. Agile (and TDD) debunked

Replies are listed 'Best First'.
Re: [OT (though it might involve some Perl programming)] One for the weekend. (Updated: significant typo!)
by choroba (Archbishop) on Mar 28, 2015 at 08:15 UTC
    Before I went to bed, I only had a guess. I started with a pen and paper, and some maths:
    w * h = (w - 2) * h + 10 w * h - (w - 2) - h = 10 h * (w - w + 2) = 10 2h = 10 h = 5

    Now, we need to find the width. To be able to step on every tile, it must be coprime with the height, and moreover, width - 2 must be coprime with the height as well. I drew the simplest cases and extrapolated the observation to the following sequence: 3, 9, 11, 13, 19, 21, 23...

    And when I got up, I verifyied the results with a Perl program. Specify a true command line argument to see the paths:

    Update: Spoiler tag removed.
    لսႽ ᥲᥒ⚪⟊Ⴙᘓᖇ Ꮅᘓᖇ⎱ Ⴙᥲ𝇋ƙᘓᖇ
Re: [OT (though it might involve some Perl programming)] One for the weekend. (Updated: significant typo!)
by hdb (Monsignor) on Mar 28, 2015 at 07:50 UTC
Re: [OT (though it might involve some Perl programming)] One for the weekend. (Updated: significant typo!)
by Anonymous Monk on Mar 30, 2015 at 03:01 UTC

    I opted for the "abuse regex" approach (because it's fun, and you can do it incrementally one s/// at a time until it works):

    #!/usr/bin/perl # http://perlmonks.org/?node_id=1121552 use strict; use warnings; for my $y ( 1..25 ) { local $_ = tile(5,$y); /1$/ and !/-/ and print "success 5,$y\n"; } sub tile { my ($w, $h) = @_; my $wm1 = $w - 1; local $_ = ( '-' x $w . "\n" ) x $h; s/-/1/; 1 while # print("$_\n"), s/1..{$w}\K-/1/s || s/1\n.*\K-(?=\n)/2/ || s/1(?=.*$)\K-/4/ || s/2.{$wm1}\K-/2/s || s/2.{$wm1}\n\K-/1/ || s/-(?=2.*$)/3/ || s/-(?=..{$w}3)/3/s || s/^.*\K-(?=3)/2/ || s/-(?=.{$wm1}\n3)/4/ || s/-(?=.{$wm1}4)/4/s || s/^.*4\K-/1/ || s/-(?=.{$w}4\n)/3/s; return $_; }

    which prints

    success 5,1 success 5,3 success 5,7 success 5,9 success 5,11 success 5,13 success 5,17 success 5,19 success 5,21 success 5,23

    Sure looks like multiple solutions exist.

Re: [OT] One for the weekend. (Updated: Answer posted!)
by BrowserUk (Patriarch) on Mar 30, 2015 at 07:20 UTC

    Just an attention getter: the answer has been posted.

Re: [OT] One for the weekend. (Updated: Answer posted!)
by hdb (Monsignor) on Mar 30, 2015 at 11:09 UTC

    Out of curiosity: what size are your tiles? Square or rectangular? If rectangular, which orientation?

      30 cm2 which for the SI challenged is 3/16" under a foot.


      With the rise and rise of 'Social' network sites: 'Computers are making people easier to use everyday'
      Examine what is said, not who speaks -- Silence betokens consent -- Love the truth but pardon error.
      "Science is about questioning the status quo. Questioning authority". I'm with torvalds on this
      In the absence of evidence, opinion is indistinguishable from prejudice. Agile (and TDD) debunked

        Do you mean (30 cm)^2 or 5cm x 6cm?

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